DIYAPASON-L Digest #30 - Monday, February 7, 2000
 
AGO tapes
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  AGO tapes
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
blower needed
  by "Kelvin Smith" <KelvinSmith@untraveledroad.com>
Re: One AMP?
  by "Kelvin Smith" <KelvinSmith@untraveledroad.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  rectifier at 110
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
One more time: the CORRECT rectifier connections are. . .
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  One more time: the CORRECT rectifier	connections 
  by <DEMPAR1@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  One more time: the CORRECT  rectifier connections
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
 

(back) Subject: AGO tapes From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 09:47:44 -0500   I promised a review of some of the tapes from the AGO conferences that I ordered through OHS.   The first one I received was Nelsen Barden doing a "standup" on secrets of successful restoration. It's an interesting view of the business, but not really anything terribly nitty gritty.   There is however a 5 tape set, "Repairing the EP Organ." I've not made it through this whole set, but I pulled out tape 3, "Windlines" as it is of the most concern to me righ tnow.   Again this is done by Nelson Barden and associates. It's a hands on lecture with lots of questions and suggestions from other organ builders in attendence.   The first segmenet is on fitting wind lines. Nelson's hint: use the track screws that are used for metal stud work to tack the thing to gether. Cutting and rivitting is also discussed.   A demonstration of using hard cast to seal a joint is done.   A demonstration of how to solder (along with a rather humerous spot on recycling pipes into solder) is done.   It wraps up with a demonstration on how to build flanges.   Pretty nicely done. Also the set comes with a handout with sales literature/contacts on some of the tools mentioned. I'm looking forward to the other four in the set.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] AGO tapes From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 09:10:58 -0600   >I promised a review of some of the tapes from the AGO conferences that >I ordered through OHS.   Ron   Those tapes are not AGO tapes but rather AIO (American Institute of Organbuilders) tapes. Although the AIO Web Site is under complete redesign currently we do have on the site a complete list of the AIO tapes that are available, in an Adobe Acrobat document. The URL for that listing is: http://www.pipeorgan.org/tapes/tapelist.pdf One of my many "hats" is that of being the AIO Webmaster along with being an Affiliate Member of the AIO.   The tape of Nelson Barden doing the "stand-up" as you call it, is a lecture that he gave at the 1995 Convention is San Jose, CA. Because it is a convention lecture it is not really a "hands-on" program.   The 5 tape set you refer to is from the Mid-Winter Seminar that was hosted by Nelson Barden and Associates in 1996. Since these Mid-Winter sessions are held at a builder's shop the attendance is limited to a small number of attendees and there is LOTS of "hands-on" sessions as part of them.   Besides the members of Nelson's shop, there are also lectures/sessions from that Seminar that include Nicholas Thompson-Allen and Joseph Dzeda of Thompson-Allen Associates, the curators of the Yale Woolsey Hall organ and noted Skinner organ restorers.   I think you will enjoy watching the rest of the series from that Seminar - they are all excellent.   David    
(back) Subject: blower needed From: "Kelvin Smith" <KelvinSmith@untraveledroad.com> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 10:14:05 -0700   Hello,   I need a blower for my organ, since the old one died. I need something = with at least 2 hp, preferably 3 or more and at least 7" static, preferably = more like 12 inches. Something within a day's drive from Idaho would be nice.   Thanks, Kelvin      
(back) Subject: Re: One AMP? From: "Kelvin Smith" <KelvinSmith@untraveledroad.com> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 10:33:07 -0700   Richard and List,   I rechecked my math and it turns out I slipped a digit and in fact I need 11.7 amps theoretically for my combination action. Thanks to Richard for making me question this. I'm glad we seem to have a majority agreement on how to rewire the rectifier for 110. Thanks again for your help on that. I'll just have to do what it takes to get it installed into the console.   Kelvin      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] rectifier at 110 From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 13:24:08 -0500   >Kelvin Smith wrote: > >> I need to hook up a Durst organ rectifier for 110. It was >> previously hooked up for 220, and I want to make sure what >> the right connections are to change to 110. It has 4 AC >> connections, numbered 1 to 4. 2 and 3 and jumpered together >> and 1 and 4 had the two legs of the 220 on them. > >Kelvin, I suggest that unless you can get someone who will bet a >ticket to the World Series on this information, you might do better >addressing your question to Organ Supply Industries. They probably >have reference information on these. Durst once owned OSI and there >is probably some carry over influence there. > >F. Richard Burt >effarbee@home.com   The four wires refer to 2 separate windings in the transformer. For 220V they are connected in series, for 110V in parallel.   Use an ohmmeter or a continuity light and probe any pair of the four = wires. When you find two that show continuity you have found which two wires constite a winding. Now obviously the other pair are the second winding. Thus you have:   1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | \/\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/   Where 1 and 2 form one winding, and 3 and 4 the other winding.   Now you need to connect 1 to 3, and 2 to 4 so you have:     1 | 2 | \/\/\/\/\/ | | 3 | 4 | \/\/\/\/\/   The 110v gets hooked between the 1,3 and the 2,4 junctions.   If you find you have no output from the rectifier, then change the = parallel connection to: 1 to 4, and 2 to 3. As in:         1 | 2 | \/\/\/\/\/ | | 4 | 3 | \/\/\/\/\/   And, oh yes, turn off the power before you do anything!   Take care!   John V                
(back) Subject: One more time: the CORRECT rectifier connections are. . . From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 16:19:50 -0600   From Richard Schneider   >John Vanderlee wrote: > >In response to Kelvin Smith's inquiry about hooking up a Durst Organ >rectifier: > > > The four wires refer to 2 separate windings in the transformer. For = 220V > > they are connected in series, for 110V in parallel. > > > Use an ohmmeter or a continuity light and probe any pair of the four = wires. > > When you find two that show continuity you have found which two wires > > constite a winding. > > Now obviously the other pair are the second winding. > >John, > >I had covered this earlier, and you're close, but "no cigar", in terms >of which pair of windings is connected to which terminals. > >See my post below from earlier. > >I wish everyone would quit sending along mis-information. It only serves >to confuse the uninitiated, and will prolly destroy someone's rectifier. > >Arp > >Forwarded message: > > >DEMPAR1@aol.com wrote: > > > > > Connections 1 and 2 are the first primary winding and 3 and 4 are > >the second > > > winding. On 220, you are connecting the two coils in series (in >1 out of 2, > > > into 3 and out of 4) For parallel connection of the coils (110 volt > > > operation) you should put a jumper from 1 to 3 and a second > >jumper from 2 to > > > 4. Your 110 volt hot wire should go to the 2/4 connection and the = neutral > > > should go to the 1/3 connection. > > > >Actually: that's not quite true. The proper connections are that 1 and > >3 are for the first winding and 2 and 4 are the second winding. > >Connecting 1 and 2 put one side of the two windings in parallel while > >connecting 3 & 4 put the other side of the two windings also in > >parallel, for use on 110. > > > >If you connect 2 and 3 together, then it still puts the two coils into > >series. > > > >I've done enough of these over the years to remember this in my sleep! > > > >Faithfully, > > > >"Arp" > >    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] One more time: the CORRECT rectifier connections are.... From: <DEMPAR1@aol.com> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 18:14:25 EST   David, maybe that is how your rectifier is wired but mine is wired like I indicated and it has been working fine for a year now. Kevin, the safest thing to do is exactly what John Vanderlee wrote...Get a meter and = identify which terminals actually constitute the windings. In all fairness to = David, I suspect my transformer may have been replaced since it is not the = original, and the wires may have been internally connected to the wrong terminals. = But again, without the ohm meter check one could easily apply line power = across a direct short, or have two windings magnetically opposing eachother.   In a message dated 2000-02-07 4:20:46 PM Central Standard Time, david@blackiris.com writes:   << I had covered this earlier, and you're close, but "no cigar", in terms >of which pair of windings is connected to which terminals. >>  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] One more time: the CORRECT rectifier connections are.... From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 17:31:45 -0600   John   If you noticed at the top of the message that was another forward from Richard Schneider. I haven't gotten into this thread since my rectifier is buried under the Great and I haven't had the time to dig in there to look at it. But I do know that mine has a label inside with the connections. I think it might be time that I try to get to it and take a photo of the label to post!!   Actually, when ever working with Electrical equipment such as these rectifiers it is time to get out the multimeter anyway and check the unit out! You don't want to burn down your house because of a faulty rectifier!! <G>   David   At 6:14 PM -0500 2/7/00, DEMPAR1@aol.com wrote: >David, maybe that is how your rectifier is wired but mine is wired like I >indicated and it has been working fine for a year now. Kevin, the safest >thing to do is exactly what John Vanderlee wrote...Get a meter and = identify >which terminals actually constitute the windings. In all fairness to = David, I >suspect my transformer may have been replaced since it is not the = original, >and the wires may have been internally connected to the wrong terminals. = But >again, without the ohm meter check one could easily apply line power = across a >direct short, or have two windings magnetically opposing eachother. > >In a message dated 2000-02-07 4:20:46 PM Central Standard Time, >david@blackiris.com writes: > ><< I had covered this earlier, and you're close, but "no cigar", in terms > >of which pair of windings is connected to which terminals. >>