DIYPASON-L Digest #3 - Tuesday, January 11, 2000
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  Blowers and Introduction
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
My background, as requested
  by "Dave McClellan" <drmc@speedfactory.net>
Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells
  by "Dave McClellan" <drmc@speedfactory.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
My Background
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Introduction
  by <DEMPAR1@aol.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells
  by "Wietstock, Steven M" <swietsto@indiana.edu>
Moller opus 5967 (Ron Natalie)
  by "Larry Chace" <rlc1@etnainstruments.com>
Re:  [Residence Organs]  Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells
  by <DBnMOPS@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Moller opus 5967 (Ron Natalie)
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells
  by "DanielWHopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Yet another introduction
  by "Tom Ed Moore" <TMoore@unanov.una.edu>
Sealing wind lines
  by "John R. Ball" <johnrball@erols.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Blowers and Introduction
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Organ facade vs tuning ease
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
My introduction
  by "Wietstock, Steven M" <swietsto@indiana.edu>
Yet another Introduction
  by <msschnel@us.ibm.com>
No Subject
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Yet Another Introduction
  by "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com>
Fw: [Residence Organs]  No Subject
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Hello
  by "H. J. Zivnak" <bztruck@email.msn.com>
Re: My Introduction (boring)
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
Re: blower motor thermal cutouts & 3 in 1 oil
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
Re: ZIMBELSTERN/Saucer bells
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
Introduction.
  by "Bruce, David" <David.Bruce@compaq.com>
and yet ANOTHER introduction!
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: ZIMBELSTERN/Saucer bells
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: ZIMBELSTERN/Saucer bells
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: ZIMBELSTERN/Saucer bells
  by "DanielWHopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca>
Chimes and etc.
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
re:Chimes & stuff
  by "David Stevens" <c830t3@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Blowers and Introduction From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 23:30:13 -0600   >Hi I just joined the groug today and read about Kelvin problem I also = have a >small spencer two hp with three 21" fans I changed the last fan and >replaced it >with a 25" fan and now the motor over heats in about 15 minites . I >think I need >a bigger 220v sinvle or three phase motor but I am not sure ? Any >ideas??? Mike >McDonald   Mike   HOW did you change it to a larger sized fan?? Every Orgablo I have run across would not have space for a fan that much bigger. The units were designed with a certain amount of space around the edge of the fans for the wind to pass along to the next fan.   David    
(back) Subject: My background, as requested From: "Dave McClellan" <drmc@speedfactory.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 07:11:49 -0500   My interest in organs was first sparked when I took private violin lessons beginning in the 3rd grade, and my teacher had a Hammond B2 in her studio. She would often accompany me using the Hammond. I was fascinated by the fiddling she would do with the drawbars prior to beginning to play. In fact, my first "organ" acquisition was a 1948 Hammond CV, which I still have. In the 6th grade is built a single manual plus pedal electronic organ using neon bulb oscillators for the local Science Fair.   Later on, our church replaced their pipe organ with a new 3/44 Moller. The previous instrument was actually a theatre organ removed from the Riviera Theatre in Knoxville, Tennessee. Its parts were flung out a second story window of the church and trashed (sigh). Soon, crates of new parts arrived: pipes and strange wooden parts were laying around everywhere in the church. I was facinated! I followed the installation with great interest and got lots of chamber tours.   Prior to and during the dedication (Virgil Fox), the Moller developed ciphers. I was the official "pipe puller" and had a key to the chambers. One summer I assisted the local Moller technician install additional felt/leather valves on the pouch rails. My job, as you might expect, was removing and replacing the bottom boards and pouch rails. I'll never forget laying on my back with a Yankee Screwdriver! But it was a labor of love. Well, needless to say, I now had to have a pipe organ.   One the kids had moved out, I started acquiring electronic organs (starting with the Hammond CV). From there I acquired a Conn 821 with AGO pedals. This lead to my finally taking organ lessons at age 53, having never taken piano (I tried ever since college to take lessons, but no teacher would accept me without a piano background). Working through the local AGO chapter, I was fortunate to find a teacher. I now take lessons with Dr. Timothy Wissler at the Cathedral of Christ the King in Atlanta (3/66 Goulding and Wood).   While attempting to upgrade to a better practice instrument, I visited the local Allen Organ Studios looking for a used electronic. The sales person was very helpful, and when I stated my interest in pipes, he gave me = several leads on pipe organs (including a Moller Artiste, which convinced me that = I could actually OWN a pipe organ). Well, it went downhill from there. I joined the various email lists as well as the local ATOS chapter. I acquired my first set of parts from Richard Schneider (3 rank Wicks). My second acquisition was a 10 rank Mudler-Hunter, which I eventually sold, since the parts were not appropriate for expanding the Wicks. My latest acquisition was a 1929 vintage 6 rank Hook and Hastings mortuary organ. I currently have the = Wicks and Hook and Hastings working and connected to a temporary console and home-built electromechanical relay.   My next step is to acquire a better console and a larger blower.   The project is documented on my web page at www.mcclellans.com/pipeorgan.htm   Dave McClellan Atlanta, GA          
(back) Subject: Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells From: "Dave McClellan" <drmc@speedfactory.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 07:19:24 -0500   I am attempting to build a zimbelstern (zimblestern?) for my residence instrument. I have a nice quiet 60 rpm motor. On other lists, it was mentioned that bells could be acquired from the various import stores. I have been unable to find anything suitable at those stores or various = craft stores such as Michaels. The bells they have are the correct size, but do not appear to be of brass, and the sound is not suitable.   Any suggestions as to a source of (cheap!) bells?   What sort of striking mechanism would you recommend?   Dave McClellan Atlanta      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 07:37:13 -0500       Dave McClellan wrote: The bells they have are the correct size, but do > not appear to be of brass, and the sound is not suitable. > > Any suggestions as to a source of (cheap!) bells?   Have you considered a larger musical instrument store and dug around to see if they have anything in the way of inexpensive hand bells or other goodies in their percussion department?  
(back) Subject: My Background From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 07:45:07 -0500   I've always been fascinated by the organ, starting with listening to the E. Power Biggs albums my parents got because they forgot to send back the postcards for the Columbia record club. About 20 years ago I picked up the Audsley 2 volume set and have been dreaming about building ever since.   About a year ago I got more serious. Initially, I thought to build a "simulation." I've been researching both the SCPOP (a program that manipulates a Roland SoundCanvas midi module to approximate an organ) and advanced sampling technology (Gigasampler). To this end I grabbed a 2M console from a junked Allen to midify.   About the mid-november I got a call from a church who wanted to know if I was still interested in the II/6 Moller they had available. By the next week I was up there with a 24 truck to retrieve the thing.   My organ was originally the residence organ of Arthur C. Cook, a DC lawyer. I have the origianl purchase constract for $3750 in 1931. Upon Mr. Cook's death, the organ went to the Good Shepherd Lutheran church for a while, until James Dale, organist for the Naval Academy picked it up in exchnage for playing the dedication concert on their new organ. Upon his death, the Naval Academy through their counterparts at West Point found a church who wanted it in NY. Unfortunately, the church wasn't really organ savvy, and didn't realize the organ didn't come with a case. Lacking the resorces to modify their building and put the thing back together, they spent a while trying to unload it (including putting it on EBay). I threw a lowball bid on e-bay (which lost), but four months later that deal fell through and I ended up with it.   Right now, most everything is sitting in the basement where the pipe chamber is to be located. The blower is in it's "final" resting place and the main chests are occupying most of my workshop (along with the junker Allen console). The Moller console is in the garage awaiting professional moves to wrangle it into the room it's going to live in.   -Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 06:58:51 -0600   >I am attempting to build a zimbelstern (zimblestern?) for my residence >instrument. I have a nice quiet 60 rpm motor. On other lists, it was >mentioned that bells could be acquired from the various import stores. I >have been unable to find anything suitable at those stores or various = craft >stores such as Michaels. The bells they have are the correct size, but = do >not appear to be of brass, and the sound is not suitable. > >Any suggestions as to a source of (cheap!) bells?   Dave   Is there a PIER ONE anywhere around you? They seem to have small bells, or at least they did, haven't been to one of them for some time now. Also some of the smaller import shops especially ones catering to importing from India seem to carry a range of small bells. Being in the Atlanta area, I am sure there are many sources.   David    
(back) Subject: Introduction From: <DEMPAR1@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 08:03:15 EST   Hello everyone, I am John DeMajo and I live in southeast Louisiana. I have a 2/7 Wurlitzer =   that I have been restoring for two years and I am just starting = construction on a studio building in Covington, LA that will be my residence, house = the organ, my antique radio collection, and serve as a mini-auditorium for meetings, concerts and state-of-the-art digital recording. I am V.P. of = the SMGC chapter of ATOS and also active as a board member in the Louisiana = OHS chapter. I am a computer network engineer and I have a young daughter who shares my interests and is helping me with my home Wurlitzer project and = with an on-going project to keep a 10 rank Wurlitzer in Jackson Louisiana operating. I look forward to some good exchanges of information on this = list.  
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells From: "Wietstock, Steven M" <swietsto@indiana.edu> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 08:05:21 -0500   Pier One no longer carries these bells. I used them for several different projects with the youth in our congregations and they stopped carrying the bells over a year ago. I had contacted their headquarters and they stated that they were now "holiday" items and would be available with their Christmas items -- no such luck. During my last contact with Pier One and their buyer a couple of weeks ago I was told that they will not be = stocking these items, nor would they disclose their importer source for these = items.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Steven M. Wietstock, Ph.D. Phone: 812-855-2700 Coord. of Instructional Programs Fax: 812-855-8300 Department of Chemistry, C021 Indiana University Email: swietsto@indiana.edu 800 E. Kirkwood Ave Bloomington, IN 47405-7102 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~     -----Original Message----- From: David Scribner [mailto:david@blackiris.com] Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2000 7:59 AM To: Residence Organ List Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells     >I am attempting to build a zimbelstern (zimblestern?) for my residence >instrument. I have a nice quiet 60 rpm motor. On other lists, it was >mentioned that bells could be acquired from the various import stores. I >have been unable to find anything suitable at those stores or various = craft >stores such as Michaels. The bells they have are the correct size, but = do >not appear to be of brass, and the sound is not suitable. > >Any suggestions as to a source of (cheap!) bells?   Dave   Is there a PIER ONE anywhere around you? They seem to have small bells, or at least they did, haven't been to one of them for some time now. Also some of the smaller import shops especially ones catering to importing from India seem to carry a range of small bells. Being in the Atlanta area, I am sure there are many sources.   David     DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own Residence Pipe Organs. HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org with the following in the BODY of the message: Unsubscribe DIYAPASON-L(-Digest)  
(back) Subject: Moller opus 5967 (Ron Natalie) From: "Larry Chace" <rlc1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 09:08:09 -0500   Ron Natalie mentioned the small Moller organ that he recently purchased. That organ, Moller opus #5967, was described quite nicely by Frank Vanaman in his note to PIPORG-L on 25 Jan 1997, entitled "SPEC and comments: Moller opus 5967", also available as item #058106 in their = archives.   Frank gave a matrix form of the stoplist:   RANK PIPES PEDAL GREAT SWELL 16 Stopped flute 97 16 8 8 4 3 2 16 8 4 3 2 16 Dulciana 92 16 10 8 8 4 8 4 3 8 Viole d'Orchestre 85 8 16 8 8 4 2 8 Diapason 73 8 8 French Horn 73 8 8 8 Vox Humana 73 8 4 8 4 Chimes 21 x x   couplers: Great to- 8 16 (8) 4 Swell to- 8 16 8 4 16 (8) 4   where 10 =3D 10 2/3; 3 =3D 2 2/3; and (8) =3D unison off   There is additionally a pedal 32' resultant, although it is not clear whether this uses the 10 2/3 dulciana or another 10 2/3 off the stopped flute.   Frank's comments on PIPORG-L are worth a (re?)reading, at least for folks who like this sort of organ design. Ron, I think you have a winner there!   Larry Chace  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells From: <DBnMOPS@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 09:29:46 EST     In a message dated 1/11/0 7:19:44 AM, you wrote:   <<What sort of striking mechanism would you recommend?>>   I've seen a satisfactory lo-buck, home-made zimblestern in which several bells, sans clappers, were mounted on vertical dowels mounted on the perimeter of an old phonograph turntable. When the turntable was powered = up (by drawing the "zimblestern" knob), the bells rode, Merry-go-round style, = by a dangling, stationery clapper, mounted just beside the turntable, so each =   bell would strike the clapper as it passed. I don't have any pictures or dimensions available, so it's trial and error from here. On many old turntables, you could select 33 1/3, or 45, or 78 rpm, giving some degree = of adjustment, and, of course, two clappers could be used, on opposite sides = of the turntable. Just one of the many "future additions" I want to make to = my home installation. :-) Hope this is helpful, Doug  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Moller opus 5967 (Ron Natalie) From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 09:54:20 -0500       Larry Chace wrote:   > > Frank's comments on PIPORG-L are worth a (re?)reading, at least for = folks > who like this sort of organ design. Ron, I think you have a winner = there! > Yes, it's looking that way all the time. I recall the resultant either = (and I don't recall it being listed on the purchase contract which describes = how things are borrowed/unified). I'll go down and peek at the relay this = evening. There's also a syn. oboe that is generated out of the viole and flute = combined.   I didn't really have much of the spec when I bought this thing (the church in New York had so many offers fall through and the woman who volunteered to store the bulk of the stuff in her basement wanted it out). When I saw the console, I knew that this was some serious unit. When I looked at the magnitude of the stuff in the basement, I felt I was going to be = divorced for sure. Howeer, 7 burly Lutherans helped me schlep the stuff on the = truck and I bundled it all back down to my house. I'm indebted to my wife for understanding (she says my biggest problem is that large things tend to follow me home) and to two friends who helped me offload the truck in Virginia.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Looking for ZIMBELSTERN bells From: "DanielWHopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 11:08:20 -0400   you can buy bells at a Dollar store,I bought about 8 small brass bells = ,with intentions to build a zimblestern,I only can find one of them,I misplaced = them :-( Just look in the dollar stores ,you will eventually find some    
(back) Subject: Yet another introduction From: "Tom Ed Moore" <TMoore@unanov.una.edu> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 09:31:00 -0600   My name is Tom Ed Moore and I live in Florence, AL where I teach at the University of North Alabama. Over the last two years I have been given, = yes given, one small organ, 3 ranks, 9 ranks from a 1939 Austin and a Vax = Humana probably of Estey origin. I had to build a room in our house for this and = am a few weeks away from winding the 3 rank inst. It was built for a local church by who knows whom. The unit bourdon has the date 1911 and location =   Birmingham on one of the pipes. I kept what I wanted out of the Austin = stuff and gave the rest to two friends here who are also building instruments in =   their homes.   Have any of you had experience building windchests. That will be my next = step on the way to having an 2/7 something. All help will be appreciated.   This list has already been helpful.   Thanks   Tom Ed Moore tmoore@unanov.una.edu    
(back) Subject: Sealing wind lines From: "John R. Ball" <johnrball@erols.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 10:32:26 -0500   I recently installed a new boiler with stainless steel vent pipe. The specified sealant was Dow 732 RTV (a high-temperature silicone). Since = this product is acceptable to the building inspectors for exhaust gasses it = would probably be good for wind lines. It really sticks and silicone is = supposed to be good for 40 or more years. It can also be cut loose if necessary. John Ball      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Blowers and Introduction From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 10:37:11 EST   Hi Kevin and the home organ gang.I am going to sugest something nto organistic,what ever that is.I could not find a big enough blower for my = hame organ, that would not take up what little space was left.Or find one near = buy for that matter.Sandy Eggo is the end of the world as far as organ stuff goes.Shipping is a killer also.Grainger's sell's exaust blower's that make =   uppwards off 15" of wind with good volume.They are a little louder but a baffel box will quiet the wind out and an insullated room will keep the blower quite.All this for about 800.dollars,and it's new!They use standard =   frame motors and you can order them single phase. You can order the blower =   with out the motor also,if you have a motor already.Food for thought. The dilivery is cheap also.Any questions ??????? Dennis  
(back) Subject: Organ facade vs tuning ease From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 10:40:03 EST   Hi Bruce,   Perhaps you can have it both ways. Have you seen the Redman Organ = Company's website?   They have painted open pipes with some of the most unusual, yet tasteful, patterns. Colorful, also.   They are at: http://www.imagin.net/~rredman/   Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: My introduction From: "Wietstock, Steven M" <swietsto@indiana.edu> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 10:44:41 -0500   I have always wanted to play the organ -- even as a preschooler I used to = be up before dawn on Sundays to see the broadcast of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir on TV just to see the organ. I started on the piano, and started = organ in Jr. High. The first organ (and still my favorite of all that I have = had the opportunity to play) was a 1967 III/60 Aeoline-Skinner at the First Presbyterian Church in Dearborn, MI (later additions by Casavant).   I am currently the organist for First Christian Church (Disciples of = Christ) in Bedford, IN where we have a 1962 II/28 Holtkamp organ. We are planning to do some major upgrades to the organ shortly -- conversion to solid state/MIDI, cleaning and revoicing of the reeds, and some other mechanical refurbs.   At home I am currently putting together a II/7 Moller (op 5990) from a church in Rockford, IL. The organ was removed and placed into storage before I acquired it. Therefore, there are several items that I will be asking for assistance to locate. The organ will be set up in our = basement. Fortunately I have an understanding wife who appreciates my love of the organ.   I am happy that this new forum exists and I have already learned some = things from yesterday's discussion of blowers and lubrication.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Steven M. Wietstock, Ph.D. Phone: 812-855-2700 Coord. of Instructional Programs Fax: 812-855-8300 Department of Chemistry, C021 Indiana University Email: swietsto@indiana.edu 800 E. Kirkwood Ave Bloomington, IN 47405-7102 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~    
(back) Subject: Yet another Introduction From: <msschnel@us.ibm.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 09:42:03 -0600       Hi, My name is Mike Schnell and I currently live in Schaumburg, Illinois ( a = NW suburb of Chicago). I do not have a residence organ at this time since I'm currently in a townhome. I have, however been around pipe organs a lot since I am a roller skater. My interest in pipe organs and the music played on them was inspired by listening to Leon Berry play the organ at the Hub Rink in Norridge, Illinois. I have been mostly a play-by-ear piano player, but since I was given a Conn spinet organ a year ago, I have been playing it and have come to realize I like it better than piano. My current organ project is making a few ranks of pipes out of paper (huh...?!??!) and maybe interfacing them with the Conn or an old gutted synthesizer = keyboard. As Frank said, it's probably another "science project". I've already learned a lot just reading up on the "tape" issue. This is the list for me. Mike      
(back) Subject: No Subject From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 10:46:47 EST   Hi Mike, Does you list of organs include, by any chance, the late George Wright's instrument? Stan Krider     Mohman@aol.com states: <snip>   By way of introduction, my name is Mike Ohman from Provo, Utah. I have a   3/26 Wurli. I am curator of musical instruments at Brigham Young = University.   We have 13 pipe organs on campus (for which I am responsible) among = hundreds   of other instruments. I am an avid theatre organist having played at the   Organ Loft in Salt Lake City and as a guest organist at the Tabernacle on   Temple Square. I also run a pipe organ repair and maintenance company = called   Ridges Pipe Organs. Nice to be with you!    
(back) Subject: Yet Another Introduction From: "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 11:16:38 CST   Dear Fellow Listers; Hi, my name is Bart Kleineweber from Chicago, Illinois. My interest in = pipe organs dates back to 3rd grade in Catholic School, when our newly built Cathedral in Lincoln, NE, installed a new Casavant of about 40 ranks.   A year or two ago, after finally purchasing a Chicago-style bungalow, = circa 1910, I decided I want a pipe organ for the second floor. I contacted = Chris Feireisen, an organ builder in Manitowoc from an ad I saw on the Theatre Organ web page. Chris soon convinced me that I could have a formidable organ in the space (for very little money) if I wanted to do almost all = the work myself, with his advice and tutoring. So up to Wisconsin I went with = a 14 foot rental truck. It came back full! I had to unload the truck = myself in Chicago, and when I got the last item in my garage, I looked at the = full garage with awe, and the feeling that I had bitten off more than I could chew.   The pipe chamber in my second floor is 10 X 12 with a ceiling of 6-1/2 = feet that is only that high for a 4 foot strip in the center, sloping to about = 4' at the sides. In addition, there is a narrow staircase leading up to it. =   My first problem was to figure out how to get the stuff up there. The console had to be disassembled stick by stick. The 3 rank windchest would =   not fit up the staircase, so I had to put all my ranks on single rank unit =   chests and offset chests. The 8' open wood diapasons and 16' bourdons had =   to lay on their sides stacked on top of each other with the windchests standing at their toes.   Anyway, the organ will be a II/P/9 when finished. A full chorus of prinzipals, 6 ranks altogether (not unified). Unified ranks of Oboe, Salizional and Bourdon/Gedeckt. My goal is to have an instrument that I = can play classical and baroque music on. Most of the pipework is used, some = of which will be revoiced. Three of the prinzipal ranks will be brand new = from Rieger Kloss in the Czech Republic, voiced kind of chiffy, in that North German Baroque style. Electric action, and of course, a solid state = relay, because there's very little room left in the chamber. I am building the chest that will play the 2' prinzipal so that it will fit in a tight = corner. Right now the organ is Jerry-rigged through the old electromechanical couplers in the console, so that I can at least practice. I have pictures =   of my ongoing installation and would like help designing them into a web-page that can be stored at Diyapason.   Bart Kleineweber Chicago, IL prinzipal8@hotmail.com   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Fw: [Residence Organs] No Subject From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 14:31:26 -0500   GW's instrument, last info on, is up for sale in his Hollywood home, Stan. Contact Banda (recordings)- maybe they can help.   Rick ----- Original Message ----- From: <KriderSM@aol.com> To: <Mohman@aol.com>; <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2000 10:46 AM Subject: [Residence Organs] No Subject     > Hi Mike, > Does you list of organs include, by any chance, the late George Wright's > instrument? > Stan Krider > > > Mohman@aol.com states: > <snip> > > By way of introduction, my name is Mike Ohman from Provo, Utah. I have = a > > 3/26 Wurli. I am curator of musical instruments at Brigham Young University. > > We have 13 pipe organs on campus (for which I am responsible) among hundreds > > of other instruments. I am an avid theatre organist having played at = the > > Organ Loft in Salt Lake City and as a guest organist at the Tabernacle = on > > Temple Square. I also run a pipe organ repair and maintenance company called > > Ridges Pipe Organs. Nice to be with you! > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > with the following in the BODY of the message: > Unsubscribe DIYAPASON-L(-Digest) >      
(back) Subject: Hello From: "H. J. Zivnak" <bztruck@email.msn.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 12:21:44 -0800   Hello Listers,   By way of introduction, my name is Joe Zivnak. I am located in Southern California. I am the proud owner of a Wurlitzer 235 Plus, Opus 1839, originally installed in the Palace Theatre Indianapolis, IN.   I purchased the organ last July from Ben Thompson who removed it from the theatre in 1961. The original organ is largely intact with the exception = of the console, which was replaced with an early (closed bracket) Style 260 console, the marimba/harp which was replaced with a Morton, and the blower of which I only have parts as it could not be removed from the theatre complete.   The "Plus" in this case was the addition of a Horn Diapason and Brass Trumpet to the normal 11 ranks. Ben added a Wurti Post Horn, Trivo Brass Sax, Gottfreid Oboe Horn and a Solo String to bring the organ to a total = of seventeen ranks.   It took a helper and I six weeks of weekends to remove the organ from = Ben's residence and transport it to my shop. The shop is the staging ground for the eventual installation in the house.   Presently, I have rewired the Solo manual chests, they still had the = double cotton covered wire, and cleaned everything up.   I look forward to many meaningful discussions on this list.   Regards,   Joe        
(back) Subject: Re: My Introduction (boring) From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 16:14:34 EST   Greetings fellow home pipe organ owners. I am a third generation organ builder who has built small practice organs for private homes. That is my =   nitch in the market with an occasional larger project such as building a = new theatre style organ (3/12) for a lodge hall in Berkeley, California, where =   the lodge members wish to use the special effects traps for their rites = and services. While I mostly do church work I have had a great deal of fun = with theatre organs from the mid-1950s until now. Presently I coordinate the = ATOS Pipe Organ Owners Group of which many illustrious members post to this new =   list. I also am the editor/writer of The Glue Pot, a biennial (unintentional) publication for the POOG. My TO experience was gained = from the SF FOX, the Avenue Theatre, the NorCal Berkeley Community Theatre, the =   Towne Theatre in San Jose, the Lost Weekend Wurlitzer, the Marina Theatre Robert Morton in SF, the Stanford Theatre, and numerous other TO projects. = I hold a Master of Science degree in Industrial Design and have enough other =   various academic credentials that they allow me to teach Physics and Chemistry. Shortly I will achieve my doctorate. Truthfully, a pipe organ = is the biggest Physics demonstration device ever conceived by man!   Glad to be with all of you,   Al Sefl A San Francisco Native!  
(back) Subject: Re: blower motor thermal cutouts & 3 in 1 oil From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 16:27:19 EST   3 in 1 has a paraffin base that can harden to something like super glue. Using it on any part of an organ will set things up for disaster. Don't = even use it on the vibraharp shafts. Use sewing machine oil because it never hardens just evaporates as it oxidizes.   When a blower motor heats up and opens the thermal safety cutout there may = be more of a problem than the larger fan. If the organ is not being played = and the thermal cutout still trips then you are looking at a bad motor winding = or some other problem. The only time an organ blower motor is using high current is when wind is being drawn. If you have enough wind leaks in = your instrument, that might do it but I doubt you could have that many without noticing the tornado in the chamber. If you have a clamp-on ammeter, = check to see if all legs of the 3 phase power are pulling identical current. If =   you have single phase, then with nothing playing, measure the current. At =   idle (not moving ANY air) the motor should only be drawing a fraction of = the full rated power listed on the motor plate. e.g.: 3hp 60Hz 220VAC 10Amp measures 1Amp at idle. Any large draw indicates either motor coil damage, =   friction within the blower, a tight bearing, a large wind loss, etc.. Remember to be careful, most electrical work on large hp blower motors has =   local code restrictions requiring a licensed electrician for good reasons.   Best to the list,   Al Sefl Guaranteed to be correct 50% of the time!  
(back) Subject: Re: ZIMBELSTERN/Saucer bells From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 16:30:01 EST   > I am attempting to build a zimbelstern (zimblestern?) for my residence > instrument. I have a nice quiet 60 rpm motor. On other lists, it was > mentioned that bells could be acquired from the various import stores. = I > have been unable to find anything suitable at those stores or various = craft > stores such as Michaels. The bells they have are the correct size, but = do > not appear to be of brass, and the sound is not suitable. > Any suggestions as to a source of (cheap!) bells? > What sort of striking mechanism would you recommend? > Dave McClellan > Atlanta >>   Hi Dave:   What I did for a client in the past was to purchase a bell tree from the Interstate Music catalogue. I then selected the bells that would go = together and tuned them on a lathe so they would blend well (knowing my client, a C =   major chord + octave). The motor was from Grainger's catalogue and was = put on an industrial speed controller. The whole of the motor assembly was enclosed in a stained and finished walnut box with the polished brass = bells mounted topside. The striker was a brass ball mounted on an arm to the = motor shaft. The client must have liked it as it goes to church with him for = many of his services. He had me add a push-on/push-off remote switch for the church use.   For those of you who really feel experimental, you can make the bells from = a bell tree into a nice set of small tuned saucer bells if you have a lathe = and patience!   Best to the list,   Al Sefl  
(back) Subject: Introduction. From: "Bruce, David" <David.Bruce@compaq.com> Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 08:24:34 +0800   Hello List.   My name is David Bruce. I am a Computer engineer by vocation and = frustrated organ builder by passion. I got hooked on organ a long time ago. Maybe it = is in the blood. My Great Uncle, took up organ at a late age and ended up playing for about 8 to 11 church services every Sunday. My own particular passion is theatre organ, although I enjoy all forms of organ, and believe that each organ is unique and has its own place.   I have worked on several theatre pipe organ installations over the years, and I do mean INSTALLATIONS, but have also been involved with ongoing maintenance, improvements and upgrades. The instrument I have had the = most to do with is a rather unique "Christie" theatre pipe organ which is now housed in a Baptist church. It started life in the theatre as a 2/7, suffered two installations in the church before two of my friends and I became involved with it. Since then, it has been rebuilt and enlarged = with some ranks which have given it a dual-purpose specification and made it = much more suitable for church use. The specification was drawn up by local organist Cliff Bingham, and US organist Jonas Nordwall. Selection of the individual new ranks was fairly critical. The instrument is currently a 2/10. A 3 manual Wurlitzer console has been purchased and rebuilt and further additions are planned which will bring it to 20+ ranks.   I have been involved to lesser degrees with other installations over the years. I have designed electronic systems for use with organ control. I have also assisted with maintenance of the electrics behind the largest tracker instrument in the southern hemisphere (Sydney Opera House). I = play some, mainly, as others have said here, "for my own amazement" or = amusement.   My wife is learning to play and shares some of my passion, (which is very nice). We moved about 18 months ago and are currently located in Alice Springs, in Central Australia. We are currently living in rented accommodation supplied as part of my contract here, so pipes are out of = the question at least for the present.   We currently are rebuilding a three manual console (theatre style). This console was modeeled on a Rodgers Olympic console, but with a double stop rail. It was controlling a 12-14 rank residence instrument prior to our acquisition of it. Initially this console will drive digital electronics = of some kind, but our long term plan is to hybridise and replace electronics with pipes over a period of time. Electronics will be retained for some ranks and probably most basses. At present we are adding second touch (springs, contacts, etc.) to the lower two manuals. We want to complete = the console before starting any of the electronics. We are currently = evaluating several suppliers of digital electronics and are watching developments in other areas with interest.   We welcome any of you, should you be visiting the Red Centre of Australia, but advance notice would be nice. Hoping to learn a lot from the joint experiences of the list, and hoping to be able to contribute some as well.   all the best,   David and Lis Bruce  
(back) Subject: and yet ANOTHER introduction! From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 19:31:44 -0600   Greetings, Friends!!   I am Tim Bovard, and have been living here in Little Rock, Arkansas for a little over 5 years now. Although I currently do not *actually* own my own residence pipe organ, I am collecting choice bits and pieces as they become available, with the goal in mind of eventually being able to construct a 2m/ped practice organ/playtoy with which to entertain myself. I envision something around 8-12 rks, probably containing a bit of 'classic' *and* a bit of 'theatre'. Many will probably call me nuts for what I plan to do <g>, but perhaps I have found a sympathetic ear in this list. =20   I work for Nichols and Simpson Inc., Organbuilders as a pipe organ technician, and in addition to service work, I do a lot of electrical wiring and action construction in our new organs. I also help in the voicing room with preparation and repair of pipework, and assist with tuning and tonal finishing. Sooner or later, I do a bit of EVERYTHING!! <WARNING -- shameless plug follows> Check us out at: <www.nicholsandsimpson.com> if you'd like!   Prior to moving here I grew up in central Illinois, where I first got "bitten by the pipe organ bug" at the sound of a wonderful 1912 4m/48rk M=F6ller. Although I took lessons on that instrument at the time, I now onl= y play occasionally (for my own amazement). That organ was also the first that I worked on (under the guidance and watchful eye of the proper curator!!). I am currently a member of the American Institute of Organbuilders, the Organ Historical Society, the American Guild of Organists, and the Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ Society.   I'm really glad to see such a good response to this new list, and welcome the opportunity to learn *and* share practical information. Kudos to David and Pipechat --=20   Cheers!!   Tim Bovard <tmbovard@arkansas.net> =20   =20  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: ZIMBELSTERN/Saucer bells From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 19:39:30 -0600   At 1/11/00 04:30 PM, Al wrote:   <snip> >For those of you who really feel experimental, you can make the bells = from a >bell tree into a nice set of small tuned saucer bells if you have a lathe = and >patience! <snip>   Funny that you should mention saucer bells......I recently purchased a box of *most* of the bells of a bell-tree at a junk sale with the idea of = doing just that very thing. By any chance do you have any odd ones from your broken set left?? If so, would you part with them??   Regards,   Tim    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: ZIMBELSTERN/Saucer bells From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 18:50:55 -0800   At 07:39 PM 01/11/2000 -0600, Tim Bovard wrote: >Funny that you should mention saucer bells......I recently purchased a = box >of *most* of the bells of a bell-tree at a junk sale with the idea of = doing >just that very thing. By any chance do you have any odd ones from your >broken set left?? If so, would you part with them??     Hi, Tim, and List. A good source for some sizes of bells is old = telephones with REAL bells in them (remember those?)... They came in several sizes, and are tunable. If you only need one or two, that could be the way to go.     Regards,   Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA   http://www.jps.net/rrloesch   Time flies whether you're having fun or not!   The best things in life aren't THINGS.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: ZIMBELSTERN/Saucer bells From: "DanielWHopkins" <danielwh@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 23:13:43 -0400   how do you tune saucer bells from old telephones I have some, I may give it a try    
(back) Subject: Chimes and etc. From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 22:30:14 -0500   The talk of Zimbelsterns has been interesting and here is a twist on that theme: has anyone experimented with making other percussions? In particular, I wonder about chimes or xylophones or orchestral bells or the like.   During the summer, I often notice the windchimes hanging on the back = porch. They are made of lengths of 1/2" copper pipe, suspended by (nylon?) = string, and hit with a wooden striker. They are tuned (a "diyatonic" scale) and really sound quite pleasant. I wonder if it might be possible to create something akin to a Harp (Celeste) or Chrysoglott/Vibraphone using such tubes?   Anyone???   Larry Chace      
(back) Subject: re:Chimes & stuff From: "David Stevens" <c830t3@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 20:07:08 -0800 (PST)   Hi, Larry & List,   A few months ago, our church had a gospel choir come to perform, and their percussionist had one of those "Latin Percussion" chime trees hanging above his congas-that gave me an idea: mount the chime tree on a small wooden stand, and have a small pulley at each end. One of the pulleys could be attached to a motor shaft, and that motor would drive these 2 pulleys with a flexible wire of some sort around them that would have a striker hanging from it, thereby hitting each chime in the chime tree in succession, creating a nice, ethereal tinkling "glissandoing up& down" sound. Not exactly a Zimblestern, but a neat improvisational idea, no? Let me know what you think. Cheers, Dave Stevens __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger. http://im.yahoo.com