DIYAPASON-L Digest #6 - Friday, January 14, 2000
 
oboes?
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  oboes?
  by "Davies, Gary" <gary.davies@BeldenBrick.com>
Hi yall!
  by "Randy Newman" <rnewman@dilligaff.rutgers.edu>
Another snippet of History
  by "Frank Vanaman" <fvanaman@mindspring.com>
Another snippet of History
  by "Larry Chace" <rlc1@etnainstruments.com>
Introduction
  by "Tom Dimock" <tad1@cornell.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by <Mohman@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@ameritech.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Introduction
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Fw: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Fw: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "David Stevens" <c830t3@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: oboes? From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 11:11:58 EST   Hi I have an oboe for sale,I can not find the e-mail who was asking for one.It is 61 notes 8' rank,4" w.p. I am going to gess on the scale,the box = is on the bottom of the pile,close to 4"8'c.$500. ?????????? Dennis Pipewheezr@aol.com Thanks for looking  
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] oboes? From: "Davies, Gary" <gary.davies@BeldenBrick.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 12:55:56 -0500   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01BF5EB8.9B3A2C1C Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   Hello List. I was introduced to the Theatre Organ at Radio City Music Hall back in = 1956. Until that time I had no interest in the organ. I came home and got permission to practice on the tracker action pipe organ at my church. Needless to say this just wasn't the same but that did not detour me. I started collecting articles regarding the theatre organ and in 1962 I purchased a Wurlitzer Spinet. This satisfied me for a while. Then a = member of our church choir new I was looking for a theatre pipe organ for my home and put me in touch with her nephew who had one he wanted to sell. It was Wurlitzer Opus 1297 originally installed in St Patrick's Cathedral in Belfountain, Ohio.   It was a 2/7 Special (Tuba, Tibia, Salicional and Celest, Dulciana, = Diapason & Flute with Chrysoglott and Chimes. When I bought it, it had a xylophone added. I have added the Glock., Toy Counter, Percussion and Piano. Also when I got the organ someone had replaced the Dulciana with a Vox.   It now has a 3 manual console and I am preparing to add 5 more ranks to = it. I haven't done anything to the combination action. I don't know if I want to restore the pneumatics or go with syndines. The back rail is already syndines. The console is a make over from a panel to a French style console.   If anyone is in the area and would like to hear or play it feel free to contact me.   Gary Davies P.O. Box 678 Sugarcreek, OH 4468l-0678   Phone (330) 852-4182     -----Original Message----- From: Pipewheezr@aol.com [SMTP:Pipewheezr@aol.com] Sent: Friday, January 14, 2000 11:12 AM To: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org Subject: [Residence Organs] oboes?   Hi I have an oboe for sale,I can not find the e-mail who was asking for one.It is 61 notes 8' rank,4" w.p. I am going to gess on the scale,the box is on the bottom of the pile,close to 4"8'c.$500. ?????????? Dennis Pipewheezr@aol.com Thanks for looking   DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own Residence Pipe Organs. HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01BF5EB8.9B3A2C1C Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META NAME=3D3D"Generator" CONTENT=3D3D"MS Exchange Server version =3D 5.5.2650.12"> <TITLE>RE: [Residence Organs] oboes?</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Hello List.</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">I was introduced to the Theatre = Organ =3D at Radio City Music Hall back in 1956.&nbsp; Until that time I had no =3D interest in the organ.&nbsp; I came home and got permission to practice = =3D on the tracker action pipe organ at my church.&nbsp; Needless to say =3D this just wasn't the same but that did not detour me.&nbsp; I started =3D collecting articles regarding the theatre organ and in 1962 I purchased = =3D a Wurlitzer Spinet.&nbsp; This satisfied me for a while.&nbsp; Then a =3D member of our church choir new I was looking for a theatre pipe organ =3D for my home and put me in touch with her nephew who had one he wanted =3D to sell.&nbsp; It was Wurlitzer Opus 1297 originally installed in St =3D Patrick's Cathedral in Belfountain, Ohio.</FONT></P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">It was a 2/7 Special (Tuba, Tibia, = =3D Salicional and Celest, Dulciana, Diapason &amp; Flute with Chrysoglott =3D and Chimes.&nbsp; When I bought it, it had a xylophone added.&nbsp; I =3D have added the Glock., Toy Counter, Percussion and Piano.&nbsp; Also =3D when I got the organ someone had replaced the Dulciana with a =3D Vox.</FONT></P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">It now has a 3 manual console and I am =3D preparing to add 5 more ranks to it.&nbsp; I haven't done anything to =3D the combination action.&nbsp; I don't know if I want to restore the =3D pneumatics or go with syndines.&nbsp; The back rail is already =3D syndines.&nbsp; The console is a make over from a panel to a French =3D style console.</FONT></P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">If anyone is in the area and would = =3D like to hear or play it feel free to contact me.</FONT> </P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Gary Davies</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">P.O. Box 678</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Sugarcreek, OH 4468l-0678</FONT> </P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Phone (330) = 852-4182&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =3D </FONT> </P> <BR> <UL> <P><A NAME=3D3D"_MailData"><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">-----Original = =3D Message-----</FONT></A> <BR><B><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">From:&nbsp;&nbsp; =3D Pipewheezr@aol.com [SMTP:Pipewheezr@aol.com]</FONT></B> <BR><B><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Sent:&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></B> = <FONT =3D SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Friday, January 14, 2000 11:12 AM</FONT> <BR><B><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 =3D FACE=3D3D"Arial">To:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></B> <FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = =3D FACE=3D3D"Arial">DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org</FONT> <BR><B><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 =3D FACE=3D3D"Arial">Subject:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT>= =3D </B> <FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">[Residence Organs]&nbsp; =3D oboes?</FONT> </P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Hi I have&nbsp; an oboe for sale,I = can =3D not find the e-mail who was asking for </FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">one.It is 61 notes 8' rank,4&quot; = =3D w.p. I am going to gess on the scale,the box is </FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">on the bottom of the pile,close to = =3D 4&quot;8'c.$500. ??????????</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Dennis Pipewheezr@aol.com</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Thanks for looking</FONT> </P>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for = =3D owners and builders of their own </FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Residence Pipe Organs.</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">HOMEPAGE : <A =3D HREF=3D3D"http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org" =3D TARGET=3D3D"_blank">http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org</A></FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">List: <A =3D HREF=3D3D"mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org">mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org= =3D </A></FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 FACE=3D3D"Arial">Administration:&nbsp; <A =3D HREF=3D3D"mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org">mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipe= =3D chat.org</A></FONT> </P> </UL> </BODY> </HTML> ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01BF5EB8.9B3A2C1C--  
(back) Subject: Hi yall! From: "Randy Newman" <rnewman@dilligaff.rutgers.edu> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 14:48:23 -0500 (EST)       Just wanted to quickly introduce myself to this list. My name is Randy Newman and i've been interested in pipe organs since about 6th grade when i had 2 ranks playing in my parents basement. A water pipe above the organ caused some real havoc on my months of work and i soon gave it up. I'm now 24 and ready to try again. So far i've aquired about 6 ranks of pipework and most of the needed accessories and am about to start setting it all up in the basement of my New Brunswick, NJ house that i share with my 3 college roomates. they think i'm a bit crazy but are fairly tolerant of the mess and smell of hide glue. i tend to favor the early 20th century "orchestral" style of organ building (i'm a real sucker for strings), but am also quite interested in theater organs and other styles of classical organs. phase one for the basement organ includes getting my 16' pedal bourdon, 8' open diapason, 8' viole, and 8' gedeckt, and 8' oboe playing. there will be some moderate unification. 7' ceilings are my biggest obstacle but with the help of some haskell basses and creative layout I think everything will fit. Future plans include an 8' doppleflute (anyone have one forsale?), an 8' clarinet (or one of these?), and more strings! (6-rank moller string divison in the works should take care of this one).     so much for quick. anyway, glad to be a part of this list. i'm looking forward to the technical info and hope there will little or none of the childish behavior i see on the other organ lists. thanks for reading.   -randy      
(back) Subject: Another snippet of History From: "Frank Vanaman" <fvanaman@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 15:30:33 -0500   Hi everyone--   Randy Newman's introduction reminded me of the first instrument I assembled, back when I was in late high school/early college, in my parent's house in Washington, DC.   I had bought a 4 rank assembled organ from someone in Moorestown, NJ, which had been built/installed by an enthusiast in a house in Avalon, NJ. Interestingly enough, while being 4 ranks, it came with a sorta home-made console having three manuals. Right, a 3/4! (and that's not 75%!)   It had clearly been a work in progress, and a number of the chests appeared to have been home-built. There were maybe 4 or 5 working stops on each manual, very roughly wired from under-key contacts to a sad looking switch stack in the back of the console.   Ranks were: 16' Flute (1-24 stopped, 25-85 open) 8' Open diapason (61 notes) 8'tc Viol d'Orchestre (4' up 49 notes, about .75" diameter at 4'c) 8' Stopped flute (61 notes)   single regulator (about 2' by 5') 3/4 HP Kinetic slow speed (1165 rpm) blower   Pretty dreadful spec, obviously; I think only the flute had a 4' extension. There was a 2' stop prepared in the console, but no evidence of its realization.   So with that mess I tried to get something musical. The poor 3 manual console was essentially unusable (although taking it completely apart and remaking, then regluing almost all of the frame parts would have cured this...) so I ended up using a 2 manual Wurlitzer console operating a 2m/4r Moller relay. The relay was a hybrid action, with all electric note relays and electropneumatic stop switches.   The stopped and open flutes had been home built by the original 'builder' and were of an odd, um, variable scale which seemed to get a bit wide at the upper end. They were set aside and later traded to a friend.   I used the existing diapason and added a 4' octave in the same chest body, as the chest was actually provided with the extra actions, but the magnets had been removed and a cover board screwed in place on the bottom board, with a similar cover on the toe board. The open flute was replaced with a very pretty Moller melodia, the pencil string was retained as nothing else would fit in the chest. The fourth rank was always changing- for a while I had an uninspiring stopped diapason; that was removed and replaced with a small oboe horn, later a vox humana and lastly a fairly broad viol celeste.   Later still I ended up with a set of Moller chimes, which were duly added, and I also fashioned a tap cymbal action from an electric door bell striker. No, I'm not making this up...I wish I were! Almost everything was winded in flex, which seems awfully embarassing now, but it was free at the time, and with everything being changed around due to my curiosity, it made many 'reconfigurations' quite easy.   What's amazing is that it played at all. I learned a great deal about what to do, and obviously what not to do. Hopefully my present project will show a bit more maturity and quality in its execution.   Anyone else have a 'first house organ I built when I was just getting into this hobby' story?   Frank Vanaman Baltimore, MD  
(back) Subject: Another snippet of History From: "Larry Chace" <rlc1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 16:29:59 -0500   Frank Vanaman dared us to tell similar stories about our first = instruments, so you can blame *him* for the following. ;-)   Mine was a 2m "hybrid", in many senses of the word, constructed over the period of a few years in the late 1950s and early 1960s when I was in junior and senior high school. It occupied about 15% of the basement of = my parents' home in Bloomington, Illinois.   The console was the keydesk of an L. D. Morris instrument of about 1906, originally tubular-pneumatic and later electrified. Since the rest of the =   casework was elsewhere, my father build a framework to support the keydesk =   and he also built a bench. We fitted the Great keyboard, center pivoted but quite short, with threaded wires lifting new 2' long levers hinged at the rear. Halfway down these levers we ran trackers down to a rollerboard =   just past the sharps on the pedalboard. From there, additional trackers fanned out to the squarerail under the 4-rank Barkhoff slider chest, circa =   1890.   The chest and trackers and squares and rollerboard had been stored in a chicken coup for several years but were in perfect operating condition = (and continued to be so). The levers reduced the key pressure to 50% but also reduced the pallet opening to 50%; that didn't seem to cause any problems. Some automobile choke cables (remember them?!?) served as stopknobs and stopactions all in one. They should have been given a 2:1 leverage but I never got around to it, so you had to pull vigorously to turn a stop on and push even more vigorously to turn it off. Strangely enough, the Great division appeared to consist of 4 identical stops, each called "Choke"! '-)   The Swell manual was left with its contacts, which were wired through an old stop switch to give a 4' Swell to Swell coupler. The cable then ran = to a home-built (by me) electro-pneumatic chest about 5' long that contained 61 pipes of a Hinners 4' open metal flute and 12 stopped wooden basses, possibly Barkhoff, to provide the 8' bottom octave. The pipes ran back = and fourth in what might be called a "Holtkampish" style. The pneumatics were =   pouches on a rack-board-ish pouchboard attached to the bottom board and connected to the Kilgen-ish barrel magnets with neoprene tubing. The topboard was laminated from two thickness of clear pine because the = pouches could not all be located directly under the pipes.   The Pedal division was the Morris Pedal Bourdon, playable at 16' and at 8'. The bottom some pipes and their chest, when turned 90 degrees and = laid down, fit perfectly in the limited basement ceiling height.   A 1/2hp Orgoblo, from the little 1/5 Hinner tracker (origin of the Swell Flute), was fitted under the basement stairs and connected via a reservoir =   to the chests. The reservoir was just that -- a "schwimmer" plate (with = 20 pounds of concrete) floating on a pillow of rubber cloth supported by a plywood box. There was no valve at all to regulate the pressure. = Instead, I removed one of the two fans from the blower and just used the resulting reduced static pressure. (Now is *my* time to blush!) It actually worked =   quite well until you held a big chord for too long. All you had to do, though, was to watch the reservoir and release the chord before the concrete weight on the top sank out of view!) During normal playing, the pipework simply "floated" on the blower's static pressure.   The pipework was a collection of things that had become available:   GREAT 8' Stopped Diapason (Kimball, Christian Science, Bloomington, IL) 8' Salicional (tc, Lyon & Healy, very mean and nasty) 4' Principal (Morris 4' Octave, Gottfried?, nice) 2' Fifteenth (Morris 8' Violin Diapason, rather "hard")   SWELL (POSITIV? NEGATIV?) 8' Flute (no stop action, 12 stopped basses, tc-up Hinners open metal) 4' Swell to Swell coupler   PEDAL 16' Bourdon (Morris Bourdon) 8' Bass Flute (12p)   Tremolo (beater, unknown origin, no stop action)   The organ worked well and was fun. I gave the parts to another enthusiast after I moved out to attend college. It would be nice now to have the Kimball Stopped Diapson and the Hinners 4' Flute, but they are long gone.   The Hinners organ (Heyworth, IL) was demolished by the local Allen organ representative when he installed a new Allen in the case. He burned the chests, action, keyboards, wooden pipes, and so on in a bonfire behind the =   church. He let me have the blower, Aeoline, Diapason (trebles only), and 4' Flute if I promised *never* to sell them (and I didn't).   The Kimball was thrown down from its chambers when it was replaced by a Reuter (or was it a Schantz?). The tin and spotted metal pipes were to be =   melted down and the zincs were discarded. I got the wooden Stopped Diapason and CC of the Melodia, which at one point I converted into a = chest with direct push-rod action from the pedalboard; the chest was then fitted =   with an old 8' Vox Humana (de-capped) to provide a Pedal Reed stop. That was very early in this organ's life and it was a thoroughly horrible = sound.   The L. D. Morris organ (Normal, IL, described in the very first issue of "Diapason") was sold to a local organist when the building was sold to the =   city school system. He used parts of it for a residence organ and gave me =   the other parts. The Barkhoff tracker (Lutheran, Bloomingto) had been removed and its church torn down before I got interested in organs. The Barkhoff's new owner, organist of our church and for many years (later) a voicer and finish at Reuter, let me have the chest and associated action = parts.   Well, that's a pretty long story, but it's Friday afternoon, so perhaps you'll forgive me.   Larry Chace  
(back) Subject: Introduction From: "Tom Dimock" <tad1@cornell.edu> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 16:37:30 -0500   Howdy all! My name is Tom Dimock, and I have a mostly not working Austin organ as part of my house. I probably come to pipe organs from a rather different direction than most here - neither my wife nor I play the organ nor have any real intention of learning! This begins to make a little = more sense if you know that I re-built player pianos for a number of years and had a general fascination with automatic musical instruments.   The idea of having a player pipe organ grew slowly, and finally got to the point of adding an appropriate room onto the house. But I still had no organ. Larry Chace had in the meantime moved to Ithaca nad we becam acquainted through work. Needless to say, he encouraged my desire to have an organ, and introduced me to Cullie Mower, a pipe organ heavyweight who maintains many of the organs in this area.   One day Cullie called and said that he might have found me an organ. He gave me the preliminary measurements, and I didn't hold out much hope, as the main walk-in chest was about 8" too large for the room. :-( But I took a day off work and we went to check out the organ. He had measured wrong! It would just fit! This gave rise to a pretty funny event the = next day when my boss asked where I had been and I replied that "I had to take the day off to measure my organ - to my great relief it was 8" shorter = than I thought!".   The organ was not at all original, having been the victim of much well intentioned "improvement" over the years, and besides, I wouldn't be getting all of the pipework, as Cullie needed some of it for a project he was engaged in. But I would get the swell and great chests, the blower, the reservoirs, and a lot of pipework, including the 16' open diapason. = We moved it into my piperoom, and the main chest fit with slightly over 1" to spare, and the swell fit into the side alcove of the room with less than 3/8" to spare. I could not have built the room to a better fit. Fate?   Well, to make a long story a little shorter, the organ did play on the swell and several unit chests, using MIDI equipment designed and = fabricated by Larry and me. One of the reasons that the pipe organ was available was that one of its "improvements" had been a complete replacement of its pneumatics with - shudder - perflex. This has continued to deteriorate, and now the swell no longer plays, so all that is working are a few all-electric unit chests.   And thus it has stood for the last several years. We keep talking about getting going on the perflex replacement job - yes, I've done some and = know I can do it - but other projects keep getting higher priority. Maybe when I retire in four years, if not before. Or maybe I'll win the lottery and can afford to farm out the more horrible parts of the job (and just buy a full new set of pneumatics from Austin).   I'm here on the list mostly to lurk and maybe get up some more enthusiasm for diving back into the project. We'll see.   Oh, and the other organ project, which Larry can probably give a much more complete description of, is the restoration of the derelict theatre organ in a theatre in Ithaca. But its condition makes mine look good. = Sigh..... ---------------------------------------------------------------------------= - Tom Dimock ---- Cornell University ---- tad1@cornell.edu "There go my people. I must follow them, for I am their leader." M. = Gandhi  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: <Mohman@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 17:39:40 EST   Hi Larry,   I loved your story. Four stops on the Great all named Choke! What a = kick. I wouldn't dare tell my tail!   Mike Ohman  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 17:27:59 -0600   At 5:39 PM -0500 1/14/00, Mohman@aol.com wrote: >Hi Larry, > >I loved your story. Four stops on the Great all named Choke! What a = kick. >I wouldn't dare tell my tail! > >Mike Ohman   Well Mike, since you have brought it up already, we are all waiting with baited breath to hear your tale!! <Grin>   David    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@ameritech.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 17:27:47 -0600     - >I had bought a 4 rank assembled organ from someone in Moorestown, NJ, >which had been built/installed by an enthusiast in a house in Avalon, >NJ. Interestingly enough, while being 4 ranks, it came with a sorta >home-made console having three manuals. Right, a 3/4!   When I first got the bug to put an organ in the house I visited a = co-worker (from the D.S. Wentz shop) who had a small 2/3 unit organ in his basement. = I was really amazed at how much music you could get out of such a small organ. Even with the traps and percusssions the organ only took a small amount of space in his basement. He gave me the best advice that I have ever not followed..."Keep it Small" The organ had a WurliTzer console and a Wicks chest with a Stopped Flute, Salicional and Diapason.   The 3/4 organ is not the strangest that I've seen. There was a fellow on the southside of Chicago who had a 4/2 in his home...believe it was a unit Flute and a unified Gamba. It certainly looked impressive in his living room. I would suspect that most people were never given the opportunity to see what was "under the hood"   jch      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 18:49:53 -0600   At 1/14/00 04:29 PM, Larry Chace wrote:   <snip> >Strangely enough, the Great division appeared to consist of 4 identical >stops, each called "Choke"! '-)   LOL!!! I LOVE it!! Reminds me of something I've always wanted to do to a console...It just seems to me that one should be able to fit a similarly-obtained handle (labeled "HOOD", of course!) under the keydesk = -- and use it to release the latch on the rolltop. Am I nuts, or what??!!   <snip, again> >Well, that's a pretty long story, but it's Friday afternoon, so perhaps >you'll forgive me. > >Larry Chace   Nothing needing forgiveness in *my* view -- I enjoyed your tale, even with its bittersweet reports of the demise of the Hinners and the Kimball. Thanks for sharing the story!!   Cheers!   Tim        
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Introduction From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 18:50:27 -0600   At 1/14/00 04:37 PM, Tom wrote:   <snip> >And thus it has stood for the last several years. We keep talking about >getting going on the perflex replacement job - yes, I've done some and = know >I can do it - but other projects keep getting higher priority. Maybe = when >I retire in four years, if not before. Or maybe I'll win the lottery and >can afford to farm out the more horrible parts of the job (and just buy a >full new set of pneumatics from Austin).   Before you buy new pneumatics from Austin -- you should check out several companies that offer releathering services. I believe there is at least one that specializes in Austin actions -- and several more "general" releatherers. I honestly have absolutely no idea of what they charge for such work, as I have never had the occasion to need such services (I have to do it myself!!), but I can't imagine it would cost more than buying the actions all over again!!   These various companies advertise in the classifieds of "The American Organist" and "The Diapason" magazines, at least. Perhaps someone else on the list has used these services or knows of their pricing...??   Cordially,   Tim    
(back) Subject: Fw: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 22:12:57 -0500   Yeah Mike...c'mon...' fess up now.     ----- Original Message ----- From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, January 14, 2000 6:27 PM Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History     > At 5:39 PM -0500 1/14/00, Mohman@aol.com wrote: > >Hi Larry, > > > >I loved your story. Four stops on the Great all named Choke! What a kick. > >I wouldn't dare tell my tail! > > > >Mike Ohman > > Well Mike, since you have brought it up already, we are all waiting > with baited breath to hear your tale!! <Grin> > > David > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Fw: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 23:26:09 -0500   I have found...one HAS to be a little nuts to get involved with these things. No crack, just fact. Moi included! I still want a 16' Bourbon stop on the Wicks at church- forget the grape juice!   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Tim Bovard <tmbovard@arkansas.net> To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, January 14, 2000 7:49 PM Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History     > At 1/14/00 04:29 PM, Larry Chace wrote: > > <snip> > >Strangely enough, the Great division appeared to consist of 4 identical > >stops, each called "Choke"! '-) > > LOL!!! I LOVE it!! Reminds me of something I've always wanted to do to = a > console...It just seems to me that one should be able to fit a > similarly-obtained handle (labeled "HOOD", of course!) under the keydesk -- > and use it to release the latch on the rolltop. Am I nuts, or what??!! > > <snip, again> > >Well, that's a pretty long story, but it's Friday afternoon, so perhaps > >you'll forgive me. > > > >Larry Chace > > Nothing needing forgiveness in *my* view -- I enjoyed your tale, even = with > its bittersweet reports of the demise of the Hinners and the Kimball. > Thanks for sharing the story!! > > Cheers! > > Tim > > > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "David Stevens" <c830t3@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 21:20:10 -0800 (PST)   Well, i've got one sorta-kinda like that. It started back in junior high when I was in shop class, and we all had to do 4 things: woodworking, metalworking, plastics and PRINTSHOP of all things. This gave me an idea:fashion a teeny leetle pump organ of about 13 notes. So, in wood shop I built this sorry little excuse for a chest that was about 20" long and had 13 holes in the top of it. I then fashioned the ugliest looking 13 note keyboard you ever saw-it was like broken billy-bob teeth. The keys were pivoted by a metal rod stuck thru the middle of the channel from cheekblock to cheekblock. There was then a frame that the chest mounted on above the keys, and a metal rod from each key channel going up into the bottom of the chest thru a tightly fit hole. Inside the chest were 13 little pallets hinged loosely with old chunks of leather I found in the arts dept, and pieces of popsicle stick glued onto the end of the pallet for the rods to push on. The pipes were crudely whacked out of scrap tin and had wooden discs shoved up into them for languids (with the stereotypical half-moon shaped upper lips) there were no toes, the pipes just got stuck right into the chest holes kinda like ConnPipes. Well, I suppose you're wondering how this crazed creation sounded. I've never heard a hydraulus before, but upon reading about how crude those were, I think this thing took the cake AND the cherry on top. Oh yeah, my wind supply was the shop vacuum in reverse. However, I did get a B+ for the semester-long effort and creativity. I owe most of that to reading the AO mags and seeing their articles on organ construction. My dog smashed the thing about 2 weeks later, so I just pitched it. (Man's best friend,NOT organ's, I guess) I'm thankful now for my 2/3 Wurlitzer, soon to be a 2/7 once I find a vox celeste, oboe horn and II mix for it(don't worry, it's a liturgically voiced organ) Ok, back to lurking.   Dave Stevens   --- Frank Vanaman <fvanaman@mindspring.com> wrote: > Hi everyone-- > > Randy Newman's introduction reminded me of the first > instrument I > assembled, back when I was in late high school/early > college, in my > parent's house in Washington, DC. > > I had bought a 4 rank assembled organ from someone > in Moorestown, NJ, > which had been built/installed by an enthusiast in a > house in Avalon, > NJ. Interestingly enough, while being 4 ranks, it > came with a sorta > home-made console having three manuals. Right, a > 3/4! (and that's not > 75%!) > > It had clearly been a work in progress, and a number > of the chests > appeared to have been home-built. There were maybe 4 > or 5 working stops > on each manual, very roughly wired from under-key > contacts to a sad > looking switch stack in the back of the console. > > Ranks were: > 16' Flute (1-24 stopped, 25-85 open) > 8' Open diapason (61 notes) > 8'tc Viol d'Orchestre (4' up 49 notes, about .75" > diameter at 4'c) > 8' Stopped flute (61 notes) > > single regulator (about 2' by 5') > 3/4 HP Kinetic slow speed (1165 rpm) blower > > Pretty dreadful spec, obviously; I think only the > flute had a 4' > extension. There was a 2' stop prepared in the > console, but no evidence > of its realization. > > So with that mess I tried to get something musical. > The poor 3 manual > console was essentially unusable (although taking it > completely apart > and remaking, then regluing almost all of the frame > parts would have > cured this...) so I ended up using a 2 manual > Wurlitzer console > operating a 2m/4r Moller relay. The relay was a > hybrid action, with all > electric note relays and electropneumatic stop > switches. > > The stopped and open flutes had been home built by > the original > 'builder' and were of an odd, um, variable scale > which seemed to get a > bit wide at the upper end. They were set aside and > later traded to a > friend. > > I used the existing diapason and added a 4' octave > in the same chest > body, as the chest was actually provided with the > extra actions, but the > magnets had been removed and a cover board screwed > in place on the > bottom board, with a similar cover on the toe board. > The open flute was > replaced with a very pretty Moller melodia, the > pencil string was > retained as nothing else would fit in the chest. The > fourth rank was > always changing- for a while I had an uninspiring > stopped diapason; that > was removed and replaced with a small oboe horn, > later a vox humana and > lastly a fairly broad viol celeste. > > Later still I ended up with a set of Moller chimes, > which were duly > added, and I also fashioned a tap cymbal action from > an electric door > bell striker. No, I'm not making this up...I wish I > were! Almost > everything was winded in flex, which seems awfully > embarassing now, but > it was free at the time, and with everything being > changed around due to > my curiosity, it made many 'reconfigurations' quite > easy. > > What's amazing is that it played at all. I learned > a great deal about > what to do, and obviously what not to do. Hopefully > my present project > will show a bit more maturity and quality in its > execution. > > Anyone else have a 'first house organ I built when I > was just getting > into this hobby' story? > > Frank Vanaman > Baltimore, MD > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and > builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > > __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger. http://im.yahoo.com