DIYAPASON-L Digest #7 - Saturday, January 15, 2000
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Fw: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Fw: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Another snippet of History
  by "Robert  Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Pipe Organ System Design
  by "John R. Ball" <johnrball@erols.com>
Introduction
  by "Paul Arndt" <parndt@worldnet.att.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 01:26:10 EST   No history...I have a friend who thought that since there was a great and = a swell, why not a bitchen and awsome? Guess it makes sense.   Dennis , enjoy the week end.  
(back) Subject: Fw: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 06:43:17 -0500   .....from a little acorn, grows the big oak tree............   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: David Stevens <c830t3@yahoo.com> To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, January 15, 2000 12:20 AM Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History     > Well, i've got one sorta-kinda like that. It started > back in junior high when I was in shop class, and we > all had to do 4 things: woodworking, metalworking, > plastics and PRINTSHOP of all things. This gave me an > idea:fashion a teeny leetle pump organ of about 13 > notes. So, in wood shop I built this sorry little > excuse for a chest that was about 20" long and had 13 > holes in the top of it. I then fashioned the ugliest > looking 13 note keyboard you ever saw-it was like > broken billy-bob teeth. The keys were pivoted by a > metal rod stuck thru the middle of the channel from > cheekblock to cheekblock. There was then a frame that > the chest mounted on above the keys, and a metal rod > from each key channel going up into the bottom of the > chest thru a tightly fit hole. Inside the chest were > 13 little pallets hinged loosely with old chunks of > leather I found in the arts dept, and pieces of > popsicle stick glued onto the end of the pallet for > the rods to push on. The pipes were crudely whacked > out of scrap tin and had wooden discs shoved up into > them for languids (with the stereotypical half-moon > shaped upper lips) there were no toes, the pipes just > got stuck right into the chest holes kinda like > ConnPipes. Well, I suppose you're wondering how this > crazed creation sounded. I've never heard a hydraulus > before, but upon reading about how crude those were, I > think this thing took the cake AND the cherry on top. > Oh yeah, my wind supply was the shop vacuum in > reverse. > However, I did get a B+ for the semester-long effort > and creativity. I owe most of that to reading the AO > mags and seeing their articles on organ construction. > My dog smashed the thing about 2 weeks later, so I > just pitched it. (Man's best friend,NOT organ's, I > guess) I'm thankful now for my 2/3 Wurlitzer, soon to > be a 2/7 once I find a vox celeste, oboe horn and II > mix for it(don't worry, it's a liturgically voiced > organ) Ok, back to lurking. > > Dave Stevens > > --- Frank Vanaman <fvanaman@mindspring.com> wrote: > > Hi everyone-- > > > > Randy Newman's introduction reminded me of the first > > instrument I > > assembled, back when I was in late high school/early > > college, in my > > parent's house in Washington, DC. > > > > I had bought a 4 rank assembled organ from someone > > in Moorestown, NJ, > > which had been built/installed by an enthusiast in a > > house in Avalon, > > NJ. Interestingly enough, while being 4 ranks, it > > came with a sorta > > home-made console having three manuals. Right, a > > 3/4! (and that's not > > 75%!) > > > > It had clearly been a work in progress, and a number > > of the chests > > appeared to have been home-built. There were maybe 4 > > or 5 working stops > > on each manual, very roughly wired from under-key > > contacts to a sad > > looking switch stack in the back of the console. > > > > Ranks were: > > 16' Flute (1-24 stopped, 25-85 open) > > 8' Open diapason (61 notes) > > 8'tc Viol d'Orchestre (4' up 49 notes, about .75" > > diameter at 4'c) > > 8' Stopped flute (61 notes) > > > > single regulator (about 2' by 5') > > 3/4 HP Kinetic slow speed (1165 rpm) blower > > > > Pretty dreadful spec, obviously; I think only the > > flute had a 4' > > extension. There was a 2' stop prepared in the > > console, but no evidence > > of its realization. > > > > So with that mess I tried to get something musical. > > The poor 3 manual > > console was essentially unusable (although taking it > > completely apart > > and remaking, then regluing almost all of the frame > > parts would have > > cured this...) so I ended up using a 2 manual > > Wurlitzer console > > operating a 2m/4r Moller relay. The relay was a > > hybrid action, with all > > electric note relays and electropneumatic stop > > switches. > > > > The stopped and open flutes had been home built by > > the original > > 'builder' and were of an odd, um, variable scale > > which seemed to get a > > bit wide at the upper end. They were set aside and > > later traded to a > > friend. > > > > I used the existing diapason and added a 4' octave > > in the same chest > > body, as the chest was actually provided with the > > extra actions, but the > > magnets had been removed and a cover board screwed > > in place on the > > bottom board, with a similar cover on the toe board. > > The open flute was > > replaced with a very pretty Moller melodia, the > > pencil string was > > retained as nothing else would fit in the chest. The > > fourth rank was > > always changing- for a while I had an uninspiring > > stopped diapason; that > > was removed and replaced with a small oboe horn, > > later a vox humana and > > lastly a fairly broad viol celeste. > > > > Later still I ended up with a set of Moller chimes, > > which were duly > > added, and I also fashioned a tap cymbal action from > > an electric door > > bell striker. No, I'm not making this up...I wish I > > were! Almost > > everything was winded in flex, which seems awfully > > embarassing now, but > > it was free at the time, and with everything being > > changed around due to > > my curiosity, it made many 'reconfigurations' quite > > easy. > > > > What's amazing is that it played at all. I learned > > a great deal about > > what to do, and obviously what not to do. Hopefully > > my present project > > will show a bit more maturity and quality in its > > execution. > > > > Anyone else have a 'first house organ I built when I > > was just getting > > into this hobby' story? > > > > Frank Vanaman > > Baltimore, MD > > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and > > builders of their own > > Residence Pipe Organs. > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > > > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger. > http://im.yahoo.com > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Fw: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 06:46:41 -0500   "...Hey, thats GREAT!" ".....Wow, thats SWELL!" "....Gee thats...?..." 1.Choir 2.Bombard 3.Orchesrtal 4.?     ----- Original Message ----- From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> To: <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, January 15, 2000 1:26 AM Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History     > No history...I have a friend who thought that since there was a great = and a > swell, why not a bitchen and awsome? Guess it makes sense. > > Dennis , > enjoy the week end. > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Another snippet of History From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 07:23:31 -0600     > "...Hey, thats GREAT!" ".....Wow, thats SWELL!" "....Gee = thats...?..."     POSITIVly wonderful !!!   SOLOng !   Robert (ducking)  
(back) Subject: Pipe Organ System Design From: "John R. Ball" <johnrball@erols.com> Date: Wed, 1 Feb 2023 17:47:09 -0500   Hello List, I am posting my system design overview to the list in hopes of getting coments that will support or improve it. Not much of it is really built = yet so that it can still be changed. However, I will still "build it myself" because 1) it's my hobby, and 2) it costs less.   The design is PC based, first, because PCs are so cheap. Second, their ability to program input and output control lines means that less active componets are needed on external control cards (cheaper again). The hardware components for the main control PC are: control PC (DOS), floppy, line driver card, input cards, rank driver cards, and MIDI card. The hardware components for the MIDI PC are: MIDI PC (Windows), Cakewalk (or similar), disk storage, and MIDI card.   The control PC software has four moduules: input, MIDI, POcontrol, and output.   INPUT: The input module collects input from keyboards and stops, etc. It feeds them to both the output module and to the MIDI exporter.   MIDI: The MIDI module exports and, in parallel, imports MIDI codes and feeds them to the output module. POcontrol: The POcontrol module manages all incoming MIDI, stop, preset, coupler, keyboard, etc. data and prepares it for output.   OUTPUT: The output module formats and sends pipe organ data as streaming data to the rank drivers. My rank driver design favors a low data rate. I think it will be under = 200kbit/sec. However, this technique does not support unitizing (which is good since I don't plan to unitize).   COMMUNICATIONS: PC I/O signals can be sent via the parallel port or a separate I/O card. I am currently planning on using the parallel = port. Running under DOS I calculate that a PC of more than 25MZ is sufficient. Since modern PCs run at many times rate that I think is a safe design.   C CODE: I have a copy of Borland C++Builder 3 and am coding in C DOS = mode. It is tempting to begin displaying various things on this PC, such as presets, = and then allowing them to be setup on the control PC, but I think it would not be better to place all controls on the same PC (hence, the MIDI PC). I do think I will display disgnostice information and allow disgnostic input on the control PC.   COMBINED MIDI AND DIRECT: The POcontrol module will accept all of its stored data, e.g. presets from the MIDI system so that the MIDI program can be in complete control. Since both direct inputs and MIDI inputs arrive at the output module one can augment MIDI playing from the keyboard or v.v. To do this = I need to sort out whether to use SysEx messages or other MIDI coding. I am inclined to not use SysEx. When inputs are captured they are mapped to = MIDI codes similar to one of the commercial schemes. I haven't tied down the details yet. With this approach I would need two PCs running to play the organ. Therefore I should try to save the last state of the presets, etc. on the control PC floppy and reload it from there when booting.   PROGRAM SIZE: The program will easily fit on a floppy do I do not need memory in the control PC. In fact, I have an imbedded chip that could be used. However, the use of DOS to control booting and assist in communication favors the use of a stndard PC.   CARD DESIGN: The line driver card translates parallel port signal levels and flavors into balanced lines. The logic is mostly modern CMOS. The input and output cards are basically shift registers with the shifting and gating being controlled from the PC. If anyone is interested I will send the three card designs and an overview of the how the PC uses parallel port lines to control those cards. I have found an interesting problem with external cards. If I use sturdy glass filled cards with prepared socket lands the bare cards can cost more than the chips on them.   Thanks for your interest and I hope to hear from you. John Ball McLean, VA.    
(back) Subject: Introduction From: "Paul Arndt" <parndt@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 18:27:24 -0800   Hi! My name is Paul Arndt. I joined the list this last week and will give a short introduction. I guess I wasn't as creative with a first organ as some on the list. I just waited until I could get something close to what I wanted.   I live near Spokane, Washington where Jesse Crawford started playing piano at a small downtown theatre (the Arcade) according to his biography. He also played a the Clemmer Theatre in downtown Spokane which still exists, but has been renamed the Metropolitan Performing Arts Center.   Now on to me. I have been interested in organs since I can remember and always waited for the church organist to finish the postlude and went to talk to them when I was 5 or 6 years of age. This was a Hammond electric. When I was in college at the University of Idaho, I did some work on a 2/6 Robert-Morton Theatre Pipe Organ originally installed in the Kenworthy Theatre in Moscow, Idaho. The organ had suffered water damage from a broken steam heat pipe above the chambers. I releathered the Flue chest and 16' offset and got the organ playing again after a number of years of unuse. The University had several Silent movie presentations on the organ after this and about a two years ago, I went back to hear a concert/Silent movie on the organ which is still playing.   After graduating, I moved to Boise, Idaho and met some people who had just purchased the organ in the Ada (now Egyptian) Theatre -- a 2/8 Robert-Morton original installation which still exists. They also had a number of Silent movie presentations featuring Gaylord Carter, Lee Erwin, etc.   Just this past fall, I finally found a Theatre Pipe organ for myself. It is a Wicks 2/6. I currently have the console, the chime action and the chrysoglott action to begin releathering on. The rest of the organ is still in storage. I have not had a chance to determine what pipe ranks currently exist, but I am quite sure the Trumpet is gone as the Trumpet Stop Tablets are non-functional as the console now sits. Also the traps were apparently discarded when the organ was moved to a church in 1938... so I will have to find or build replacements for them. I was able to get the original specifications from Wicks so I know what it originally shipped from the factory with. The organ also has several Robert-Morton pieces, so it is already a hybrid. By the way, it has been in storage for 20 years I was told. Regardless, it is in quite good shape.   Like one other person mentioned, I do not play and intend to use a computer relay with MIDI to operate it most of the time, but hope occassionally, to have real people come and play it. Since I have only worked on installed TPOs in the past I am going to have lots of questions to be answered by people on the list. Especially regarding blowers, winding etc.   Well, that's it for now.   Paul Arndt