DIYAPASON-L Digest #20 - Friday, January 28, 2000
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  Resources (was Burning holes (was making own ches
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Burning holes (was making own chests)
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Resources (was Burning holes (was makingown  ches
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Appropriate chest pressure
  by "Sam Vause" <vause@home.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Mitering Pipes (was new member)
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Step down regulators
  by "Kelvin Smith" <KelvinSmith@untraveledroad.com>
Burning holes
  by "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Mitering Pipes (was new member)
  by "Ron Rarick" <rrarick@gw.bsu.edu>
Fwd: Re: [Residence Organs]  Mitering Pipes (was new member)
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: [Residence Organs] Countersinks and other tools
  by "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com>
Fwd: Spiral Wind duct.
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Appropriate chest pressure
  by "Kelvin Smith" <KelvinSmith@untraveledroad.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Appropriate chest pressure
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Resources (was Burning holes (was making own chests)) From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 07:36:00 -0600   At 2:21 PM -0500 1/27/00, Larry Chace wrote: > The AIO's video tape "Electric Chests -- Heroes or Heathens" gives >Chuck Kegg's view on that topic.   Hi Folks   Larry mentioned the above video tape in his posting and I thought I would expand on that.   The American Institute of Organbuilders has a Video tape series of lectures and workshops from past Conventions and Mid-Year Seminars that contain some very good and valuable information covering all sorts of topics that would be of interest to those building their own instruments.   There is a non-current listing on the AIO Web Site at: http://www.pipeorgan.org - the list ends, I think, with the 1997 convention. But that site is under complete redesign (I should know, I am the Webmaster for the AIO) and the new site will be on-line sometime within the next month. I will send out a posting when the new site is up and running for the general public.   Besides the Video tapes the AIO also publishes the "Journal of American Organbuilding" which is available to non-members for something like $12.00 per year. There is very little info about it on the current site but the new site will have more information about subscribing to it along with an index of back issues including the major articles in each issue, that are available from the AIO office.   If someone can't wait for the new web site I can supply people with PDF copies of the updated Video list and the Back Issue list. Please contact me privately.   Another good resource from the AIO is the yearly convention which is open to non-members. This year it will be in Colorado Springs, CO at the beginning of October. Again, there will be information about it on the new Web Site. It is not only a chance to learn and meet the professional members of the AIO but there are also exhibits set-up by almost all of the suppliers to the industry. These exhibits are a good way to meet people from those companies and make contacts for getting supplies from them. And having been to the OHS Convention in Denver a couple of years ago I know that several of the instruments that will be heard this year will be quite wonderful since they were heard at OHS.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Burning holes (was making own chests) From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 08:54:53 -0500       Bob Loesch wrote: > > At 01:26 PM 01/27/2000 -0500, Eric Sagmuller wrote: > >Perhaps others on the list can enlighten us > >to why burned holes ? > > I was told that it was done to seal the pores of the wood against air = leakage. >   At least one book I have says it's to make an absolutely smooth joining surface.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Resources (was Burning holes (was makingown chests)) From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 08:56:31 -0500       David Scribner wrote:   > > There is a non-current listing on the AIO Web Site at: > http://www.pipeorgan.org - the list ends, I think, with the 1997 > convention. But that site is under complete redesign (I should know, > I am the Webmaster for the AIO) and the new site will be on-line > sometime within the next month. I will send out a posting when the > new site is up and running for the general public.   I bought a bunch of these tapes via the OHS. I've only gotten through the first one. But I'll offer reviews on them as I get a chance.  
(back) Subject: Appropriate chest pressure From: "Sam Vause" <vause@home.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 06:56:26 -0700   A question for the list, but first a de-lurking introduction: I live in Chandler, AZ (a suburb 25m SE of Phoenix), professionally am the UNIX Product Manager for Intel Corporation (no, sorry, no free samples:-)) and personally am quite the organ nut. Although my playing is getting rusty, = my love for the organ still is quite strong.   I've got a Rodger's 760 with a three-rank set of dual chests (wooden 8' flute, metal 4' principal, metal 4' dulciana), and have recently decided = to measure the wind pressure in the chests. Using 1/2" I.D. plastic pipe, = some water, and a ruler, I've determined the pressure to be 1-3/4". The ranks = are sufficiently loud, the pressure seems stable, and I can't seem to starve = the chests even on very long chords with lotsa' stops.   So, the questions: (1) is this pressure reasonable? (Sorry, don't know the original voicing pressures for the pipes--they're Roosevelt from before = the turn of the century.) I thought 3" would be a more expected pressure, but that's not my experience here. (2) I will be addiing additional ranks (the organ supports up to 23), and I think there's gonna' be another blower or two before it's all over; should I try to keep all the pressures the same, or not worry about the differences in the chests, just try to match the = pipe voicing pressures to stable chest pressures?   Comments? --sam Sam Vause (Chandler, AZ)    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Mitering Pipes (was new member) From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 07:56:51 -0600   At 7:55 AM -0500 1/27/00, KmballMan@aol.com wrote: >My first problem is that I have 6 or so 8' string and celeste pipes that = are >too tall for my shambers and need to be mitred. Do any of you folks know = of >someone within reasonable distance that I can have do this delicate work   Hi John   I know that Richard Schneider sent an answer to this yesterday since I forwarded it to the list for him. But I do have to disagree with something he said in his posting. I quote:   "Actually: I'm not aware of any Pipeshops in the South at all."   I can think off the top of my head of about a half a dozen firms that are in the South that are equipped to handle something like this for you. It doesn't take a full pipe shop to do mitering just someone that is accustomed to doing it and several of these companies I would consider to fall in that category. Actually, I can think of one list member connected with one of these firms that would be able to help but I will let him identify himself to you.   Most firms that either build using recycled pipe work or that are involved with moving organs should be able to handle a request like this. You may have to work around their schedule a bit but I am sure that something could be worked out.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Step down regulators From: "Kelvin Smith" <KelvinSmith@untraveledroad.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 07:22:02 -0700   In consideration of what Larry Chace said here, I think I will get a separate regulator for the tuba which can be quite small and wind it straight from the blower. The pedal regulator will also be winded direct from the blower. Neither of these have tremulants. Then I will set the = main regulator closer to 7" so I can preserve my classic style tremulants. I = was really pleased with the way the swell tremulant came out (the only one = that I had hooked up.)   I have never seen a cone valve before, but I have lots of curtain valves = to use as samples, so that's the style I plan to make. I thought I would undertake to build my own regulator for the tuba and for the console (assuming that I find that I need one).   Kelvin   >Isn't there a quote from G. Donald Harrison in one of the Callahan books >regarding statis regulators? He explained that Aeolian-Skinner was using >them, set to produce an output that was just an inch or two higher in >pressure than the output of the regulators up in the organ chamber. That >way, the chamber regulators didn't have to deal with a large pressure >difference. > >In the theatre organ world, it seems to be a general rule that the static >pressure should be about 150% of the chest pressure in order to get a >"good" tremulant, at least for Tibias. The high input pressure gives a = bit >of a "bump" to the pipes when the regulator valve opens. I would suspect >that for a more classic organ design that effect would be considered a >defect and that static regulators would be a good idea if the blower >pressure were considerably higher than the chest pressure.      
(back) Subject: Burning holes From: "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 09:15:52 -0600   Good day to all!   Just a thought on "burnishing" toe holes. I have said time and time again that I am as excited about looking at what I have built as playing and hearing Eleanor! Everyone that comes to visit always wants to look around at everything. And since my Great and some Pedal is all unenclosed and exposed in my living room, the chests are all visible. With this in mind, = I did a little more work on their finish. The chests, that is the toe = boards, sides/ends, and rack boards all have about 15 or more coats of lacquer. 6 to 8 of lacquer sanding/sealer and then the rest clear glossy lacquer. = The time, as I am sure everyone is well aware of, is in the sanding in between coats. I usually give them 2 coats and then a sanding. All this is the = say that when you see them, the black "burned" toe holes give a beautiful contrast. The glossy wood then the dark/black toe holes supporting shiny silver pipes or wooden feet look super.   I have used two different tools for my toe holes. The first builder I was around used a tool that someone had made for him. A big "top" looking = tool, very heavy. I would place it in my drill press and heat it with a torch = and spin it at my highest speed. Then "burn" the holes. A mess, for sure = with lots of smoke, ashes and most often a loud squealing sound. (I would drag my drill press out onto the drive way for this task.) Another builder friend uses a stone, much like a counter sink tool, but made out of stone. I can't remember the angle that he uses. He gave me a handful to try one day. Boy, was that easier and did just as good of job without as much work/smoke/squealing. Both gave me that black/dark hole.   I have seen the toe holes that look just like the wood. I guess they were made with a counter-sink. They look nice, but my own favorite is the dark contrast.   Everyone have a great weekend!   Craig  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Mitering Pipes (was new member) From: "Ron Rarick" <rrarick@gw.bsu.edu> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 11:36:18 -0500     "It doesn't take a full pipe shop to do mitering ..."   I'll say. I've seen zinc basses mitered in the back yard using hacksaw, file, and blowtorch. It wasn't me and I'm not naming names, but the result actually wasn't too bad. You gotta know what you're doing, though (it's all in the wrist...).   Ron Rarick Muncie, Indiana        
(back) Subject: Fwd: Re: [Residence Organs] Mitering Pipes (was new member) From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 11:49:51 -0600   Another Forward from Richard Schneider:     >Ron Rarick wrote: > ><It doesn't take a full pipe shop to do mitering> > > > I'll say. I've seen zinc basses mitered in the back yard > > using hacksaw, file, and blowtorch. It wasn't me and > > I'm not naming names, but the result actually wasn't > > too bad. You gotta know what you're doing, though > > (it's all in the wrist...). > >No, it's all in knowing what you're doing! > >Do NOT try this with Spotted Metal pipes, or else you'll have a nice >puddle of Pipe Metal all over the grass! > >Proper preparation of the metal for soldering is the chief bug-a-boo, >and having a good Pipemaker's soldering iron is also quite important. >One has to be able to regulate the heat in such a way that the solder >flows into the joint, but is not so hot that the solder either perishes >or it begins to melt the pipe metal being soldered. Fortunately for the >amateur: zinc is a whole lot more forgiving of such things. > >Faithfully, > >"Arp" (still stuck without his shop computer for another day while the >hard drive is being replaced!)    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Countersinks and other tools From: "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 12:37:01 CST   Hi Randy and List: The countersinks I got from Tracker Tool Supply were 83 degrees. Buy the = 82 degree set, I don't think 1 degree should make a difference.     > >since we're on the topic of burning holes and countersinks, i'm curious >what angle countersink is traditionally used for toeboards? [snip] >they >come in either 60, 82, or 90 degree angles. which should i use? >   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Fwd: Spiral Wind duct. From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 13:54:57 -0600   And another forward from Richard Schneider - He is sending these from his home computer which has a different address than the one he is subscribed from so the list server won't accept them.   >Dear List: > >Someone asked about the source of Spiral wind duct for pipe organ. I >have a web page URL you can check out: > >http://www.airhand.com > >This company specializes in fittings for dust collection systems, but >the aerodynamic characteristics which makes these fittings so useful for >dust collection also serve to "feed" pipe organs wonderfully with little >turbulence and wind-noise (as much as is possible for sheet metal >ductwork) > >I hope this helps! > >Best! > >"Arp" > >(who's STILL waiting for his shop computer to come back!!)    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Appropriate chest pressure From: "Kelvin Smith" <KelvinSmith@untraveledroad.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 15:03:20 -0700   I am surprised at the low wind pressure. I didn't know pipes could speak = at that pressure.   I have 30 ranks of pipes playing on four different regulators in my organ. I don't have a wind guage and never tried to jury rig one. I just threw on the weights that I had and when I ran out of those, I went outside and brought in some rocks and put those on. When the pipes sounded right, then that's where I left it. The original pressures on these divisions were at different levels, the great was the lowest at 4 something, the pedal was 5 3/4". I think I have the swell a little higher than it was and the great a little lower, because that was the easy to compensate for the swell be a little muffled in my installation (compared to the great which is very unmuffled). I plan to get me a wind guage one of these days so I'll at least know what the pressure is, but I don't see that as being more urgent than other things.   Kelvin   Kelvin (Paris, ID)   >A question for the list, but first a de-lurking introduction: I live in >Chandler, AZ (a suburb 25m SE of Phoenix), professionally am the UNIX >Product Manager for Intel Corporation (no, sorry, no free samples:-)) and >personally am quite the organ nut. Although my playing is getting rusty, = my >love for the organ still is quite strong. > >I've got a Rodger's 760 with a three-rank set of dual chests (wooden 8' >flute, metal 4' principal, metal 4' dulciana), and have recently decided = to >measure the wind pressure in the chests. Using 1/2" I.D. plastic pipe, = some >water, and a ruler, I've determined the pressure to be 1-3/4". The ranks = are >sufficiently loud, the pressure seems stable, and I can't seem to starve = the >chests even on very long chords with lotsa' stops. > >So, the questions: (1) is this pressure reasonable? (Sorry, don't know = the >original voicing pressures for the pipes--they're Roosevelt from before = the >turn of the century.) I thought 3" would be a more expected pressure, but >that's not my experience here. (2) I will be addiing additional ranks = (the >organ supports up to 23), and I think there's gonna' be another blower or >two before it's all over; should I try to keep all the pressures the = same, >or not worry about the differences in the chests, just try to match the = pipe >voicing pressures to stable chest pressures? > >Comments? >--sam >Sam Vause (Chandler, AZ) > > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Appropriate chest pressure From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 17:14:59 EST   Hi Kelvin--- You can make yourself a wind gauge very easily with a length of clear = tygon or plastic tubing. Say about 6 feet. Tywrap it around a old yardstick = with the 2 legs at the up side of the measuring lines. Fill the tube with water,,enough to get it to some inch marking exactly preferably. make some =   kind of cork adapter for the other end of the tube to fit it to the = windchest hole. With note valve open, read the summation of the inches on the = measuring device,,,,ie, 3 inches up and 3 inches depressed, =3D6 inch wind. The size = of the tubing makes no difference at all,,,its the weight of the water that = does the measuring. Hope this helps, ---Roc