DIYAPASON-L Digest #67 - Friday, March 24, 2000
 
German fifteenth
  by "Caroline Kehne" <ckehne@accglobal.net>
Orgoblo pads
  by "Brian Graham" <bgraham@geaf.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  German fifteenth
  by "Barry Norris" <the1220chambers@yahoo.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  German fifteenth
  by "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com>
Guest Book
  by "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com>
Fifteenth
  by "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Fifteenth or what-have-you?
  by "Richard Schneider, President" <arpncorn@davesworld.net>
 

(back) Subject: German fifteenth From: "Caroline Kehne" <ckehne@accglobal.net> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 10:05:09 -0500     In response to Jimmy's query for the German equivalent to the fifteenth, I believe the most common name used would be 'super octave' (principal 4' was the 'octave' and the diapason 8' was the 'prinzipal'). Would a principal 1' be a 'super-duper- octave'? sorry...!   Robert Pelletier  
(back) Subject: Orgoblo pads From: "Brian Graham" <bgraham@geaf.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 09:05:05 -0600   Dear Listers,   Here is the reply that I got from Spencer regarding Orgoblo pads, FYI:   The hair felt pads that are indicated in the manual are no longer = available. We now offer cork pads that are placed under the feet of the machine. = These pads come in four sizes 1"x3"x37"long, 1"x3"x25"long, 1"x3"x21"long, and 1"x3"x17"long. If you would like to order any of these pads you may do so by calling 800-232-4321and asking for the parts dept., or try these extensions 258, 216, or 322. If you need to discuss this further with me my extension is 259. Regards Lester Raymond  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] German fifteenth From: "Barry Norris" <the1220chambers@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 07:53:07 -0800 (PST)   Jimmy,   I nosed around in some North German stoplists from the past three or four centuries, and found what Robert had already suggested to you.   Oktave: at 2' pitch, even when there is a 4' Oktave and an 8' Prinzipal underneath. This of course is especially true when the principal doesn't begin until 4' pitch.   Superoktave: also found about the same number of times as "Oktave," to denote the princ(z!)ipal rank two octaves above the lowest-pitched principal of a division, such as on the Positiv: 4' Principal, 2' Oktave, 1' Superoktave.   Oktav: I saw only once to designate a 1' when the 2' below was spelled with the "e" added on the end. Go figure!   I suspect that any derivative of the word "octave" would be great for your use. There is one major exception though: "OCTAVIN.   Even though many 20th century American builders (including Harrison) used this word to name a 2' principal, it really describes a small scale 2' harmonic flute. It is a 19th-century-ism, if you will. The Parisian builder, Cavialle-Coll used it often in his Recit divisions.   Didn't mean to write such an epistle! Hope this is helpful.   Barry Norris     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger. http://im.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] German fifteenth From: "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 09:47:15 -0800   Caroline Kehne wrote:   > ...Would a principal 1' be a 'super-duper- > octave'? sorry...! >   How about Hyper-Octave? What, you say that's not a German word?   Mac Hayes          
(back) Subject: Guest Book From: "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 13:30:46 CST   Dear fellow listers: Harpsichord builders often allow famous harpsichordists to sign a corner = of the actual soundboard of the instrument after they have played it. One would not allow everyone to sign it, just people like Igor Kipnis, etc. = You could set up a panel in the chamber for guest organists to sign. If it's not a very large panel, you could still pick and choose who signs it by = not allowing everyone into the chamber to see it.   Cheers, Bart Kleineweber Chicago, IL prinzipal8@hotmail.com ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Fifteenth From: "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 13:40:24 CST   I researched this in several different ways because I was doing basically the same task, (trying to determine the German name and spelling for the stops I had). I polled Piporg-L, I looked in Audsley's stop dictionary, I =   looked at album covers for CDs recorded on 18th Century German organs. A fifteenth is called a "Superoktav" if it is two octaves above the lowest prinzipal in the division. If the lowest prinzipal in the division is a 4 =   foot, as in a Brustwerk, Oberwerk, or Positiv, it would then just be = called "Oktav". Check out my webpage at the DIYapason site under Member Pages, = my organ specification has all the stops with German names and spellings.   Bart Kleineweber Chicago, IL http:/www.diyapason.pipechat.org/webpages/kleineweber prinzipal8@hotmail.com     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Fifteenth or what-have-you? From: "Richard Schneider, President" <arpncorn@davesworld.net> Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2000 16:45:30 -0600   Bart Kleineweber wrote: > I researched this in several different ways because I was doing = basically > the same task, (trying to determine the German name and spelling for the > stops I had). I polled Piporg-L, I looked in Audsley's stop dictionary, = I > looked at album covers for CDs recorded on 18th Century German organs. = A > fifteenth is called a "Superoktav" if it is two octaves above the lowest > prinzipal in the division. If the lowest prinzipal in the division is a = 4 > foot, as in a Brustwerk, Oberwerk, or Positiv, it would then just be = called > "Oktav". Check out my webpage at the DIYapason site under Member Pages, = my > organ specification has all the stops with German names and spellings.   This is about correct. Generally speaking, the "basis-stop" for a division is in the Facade, in which case, it is called the Prestant. The next octave higher would then be the Prinzipal, and finally, the next octave above would be simply Oktav. If it goes higher than that, the work Oktav is usually repeated without the "Super" adjective modifier applied to it. At least: that's been my experience.   Of course, this means that on a tiny Positiv, it's then possible to have a 2' Prestant stop, since it is most likely the "basis Principal" for the organ!   Faithfully,   "Arp in the Corn Patch" Richard Schneider SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders 41-43 Johnston St. P. O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com Business EMAIL rnjs@family-net.net Personal EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com Web Page URL