DIYAPASON-L Digest #93 - Wednesday, May 17, 2000
 
Project Description
  by "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@sockets.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Project Description
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Hope Jones Tromba?(x-posted)
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
re: Project Description
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
 

(back) Subject: Project Description From: "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@sockets.net> Date: Wed, 17 May 2000 11:29:24 -0500   I am a list Newbie and here is my project.   My decision to own and restore an RO came in 1997. The project continues to evolve in a controlled growth manner and now is best described as being very focused on two main goals.   The first obvious goal is to have a properly working, properly installed residence organ that will correctly represent early twentieth century residence organs. The second goal is to preserve the music that was on = the player rolls that most of these organs used.   While my music room is being planned and constructed, restoration of the console has already begun. Previous efforts by others to restore the roll mechanism in the console were well intentioned but a total failure. Insidious leaks were inadvertently induced underneath a new plastic guide piece that had been fashioned to replace a celluloid guide that obviously had become unserviceable. The guide acted to hold each reed switch contact actuator wire in position and more importantly, to serve as bleed vents to the actuator pneumatics. These leaks had rendered the roll = player 80% inoperative.   As the roll player restoration nears completion, the addition of a MIDI interface is being planned. A Detronix system will be added to the console. Full MIDI in/out capabilities of all manuals, stops, and expression has been designed. Input from the roll reader will allow roll data to be saved in computer files.   Since it will be a long time before this organ plays (pipes) again, the rolls can be reviewed by using the console and its MIDI output to drive an organ module.   I have two current efforts in progress. I recently almost purchased a Rodgers with MIDIto act as a surrogate organ to allow review of the rolls while the music room and organ restoration progresses. I intend to duplicate the better rolls and update some of the 116 note format rolls to fully automatic Duo-Art rolls. When my attempt to buy the Rodgers failed, I began looking at the much cheaper alternative of using a Module for preview and edit purposes. I would welcome comments on choice of Modules, etc. Is Ahlborn a good choice?   The instrument I own is Opus 1280, an Aeolian organ built in 1914 and originally installed in the Jay Gould mansion, 47th and 5 Ave., New York. This 3M/34R instrument left its New York address in the late 40's and was set up in a much smaller residence in New Jersey. I removed it from that location in 1998. The instrument needed restoration but was in excellent condition and still could be played.   The previous owner had grown up in the era of this instrument and was an avid collector of many related items. Significant is the roll collection. The organ plays what is called 116 note music which requires manual registration changes by the operator. Some 950 of these rolls in near = mint condition are included in this collection.   Additionally, the previous owner had acquired an Aeolian Duo-Art = Concertola roll changer to be used with the organ. That concertola and many of the 260 Duo-Art automatic rolls came from the Rockefeller family holdings.   The concertola will also have MIDI capability, and the Duo-Art rolls will also have data files in a like manner to the 116 note rolls.   I will enter my Bio a bit later.   Bob Taylor      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Project Description From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Wed, 17 May 2000 12:10:25 -0500   At 5/17/00 11:29 AM, you wrote: >I am a list Newbie and here is my project. > >My decision to own and restore an RO came in 1997. The project continues >to evolve in a controlled growth manner and now is best described as = being >very focused on two main goals. > >The first obvious goal is to have a properly working, properly installed >residence organ that will correctly represent early twentieth century >residence organs. The second goal is to preserve the music that was on = the >player rolls that most of these organs used.   <snip>   Greetings, Bob, and welcome to DIYapason-L! Hope you find us to be a useful and valuable resource to aid in your project.   Speaking of which, may I say a "thank you" to you personally, for conceiving and implementing your project as you have? I have long felt that the early 20th C residence pipe organ (by Aeolian, and others) is a segment of "American organ history" that was sorely neglected in our = modern 'organ world'. I'm very happy to hear of your plan to not only restore = the organ itself, but more importantly to preserve the music roll collections.   This all *might* stem from a semi-selfish outlook on my part...I've always been particularly enamored of such pipe organs and their music, having usually found them to be some of the most entertaining (and interesting) forms of the organ as we know it.   Kudos to you Bob, and good luck as the project progresses. I hope we will hear about it often!!   Cordially,   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR    
(back) Subject: Hope Jones Tromba?(x-posted) From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Wed, 17 May 2000 15:38:01 -0500   Dear List,   We have obtained what may be a Hope_Jones Tromba. 61 notes from 8 ft. As I said: "may be"   Does anyone know what to look for for possible identification?   Regards,   John V      
(back) Subject: re: Project Description From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Wed, 17 May 2000 17:55:59 -0500   At 5/17/00 11:29 AM, you wrote: >I am a list Newbie and here is my project. > >My decision to own and restore an RO came in 1997. The project continues >to evolve in a controlled growth manner and now is best described as = being >very focused on two main goals. > >The first obvious goal is to have a properly working, properly installed >residence organ that will correctly represent early twentieth century >residence organs. The second goal is to preserve the music that was on = the >player rolls that most of these organs used.   <snip>   Greetings, Bob, and welcome to DIYapason-L! Hope you find us to be a useful and valuable resource to aid in your project.   Speaking of which, may I say a "thank you" to you personally, for conceiving and implementing your project as you have? I have long felt that the early 20th C residence pipe organ (by Aeolian, and others) is a segment of "American organ history" that is sorely neglected in our modern 'organ world'. I'm very happy to hear of your plan to not only restore = the organ itself, but more importantly to preserve the music roll collections.   This all *might* stem from a semi-selfish outlook on my part...I've always been particularly enamored of such pipe organs and their music, having usually found them to be some of the most entertaining (and interesting) forms of the organ as we know it.   Kudos to you Bob, and good luck as the project progresses. I hope we will hear about it often!!   Cordially,   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR