DIYAPASON-L Digest #162 - Sunday, October 15, 2000
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  blower help
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: blower help suggestions
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
Wiring and cables
  by "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@sockets.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  blower help
  by "Hugh Knapton" <knapton@superaje.com>
[Residence Organs]  Re: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs]  Buildi
  by "Hugh Knapton" <knapton@superaje.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wiring and cables
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: [Residence Organs] How is yourproject   going
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@home.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  blower help
  by "william baron" <bourdon_8@yahoo.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  blower help
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  blower help
  by "Bernard C. Nordmann" <bcnordmann@cdmnet.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: [Residence Organs] How is yourproject  going?
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Pedal pipes
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] blower help From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 00:48:57 EDT   Hi William and list--- Regards your noisy blower problem-- Is is a Century motor? I suspect it probably is,,,they were a favorite = with Kinetic as well as Spencer in earlier days with fractional and under 5HP motors. Is the Kinetic a wood cased model? (fan enclosure) If you could advise me on these questions, I think I can help you. Regards, ---Roc LVRockafellow  
(back) Subject: Re: blower help suggestions From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 03:15:32 EDT   << Hello everyone > Today I got my blower hooked up to electric. I threw > the switch and WOW, THIS THING IS LOUD! Something has > to be wrong. As soon as I turn the power off its > quiet. So it must be the motor. Does anyone have any > suggestions. > It's a kinetic blower. Motor is 3/4 hp single phase > 110 volt. > Thanks, > Bill >>   Hello Bill:   Most Kinetics are reasonably quiet. I would remove the coupling leathers between the motor and the fan shaft. Run the motor without the blower section attached and see if it run quietly. With no load it shoud run = very quietly. Did you run the blower with the outlet wide open? That will = cause the motor to run hard and above its rated specs. A blown wind sock can = blow a motor that does not have overload protection (thermal and current). A misaligned common rotation axis on the motor and the blower shaft can give =   you a great amount of noise. Letting the motor run free will give you a = clue.   Another possible problem might be the shaft bearings allowing the blower = fans to contact the stators. If the motor armature is being pulled or pushed = from its magnetic center by the blower shaft that too will cause noise. Again, =   remove the motor coupling and run the motor freely. With the power off = move the shaft by hand to see if there are any rough spots. Pull and push the shaft to see if it has too much axial play. Do the same with the disconnected fan shaft.   Owning a pipe organ is like owning a Model T, you've got to be a mechanic!   Al Sefl  
(back) Subject: Wiring and cables From: "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@sockets.net> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 10:04:37 -0500   I would like to hear from the list on two issues: Cabling and connectors.   When I set up my organ, I will be using all new cable. Using an eight rank compound chest as an example, should I run two cables from the relay to the chest for the notes, and one separate smaller cable for the stop action?   Since the ranks are all 61 notes, I could use two 64 conductor cables for the two sets of primaries, and one 24 conductor for all sixteen stops and perhaps also the trem.   In the above example, the cables will originate by connection the junction board. How should they be connected to the chest (or primaries)? Should the chest have an external push down type connector?   My intent is to be neat, reliable and close to standard practice. I am = not interested necessarily in finding the least expensive method.   Bob Taylor      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] blower help From: "Hugh Knapton" <knapton@superaje.com> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 11:03:20 -0400   Hello Bill   Can you describe the "LOUD" noise?... and does it disappear immediately upon cutting the power, or does it take a second or so?   Hugh   >Hello everyone >Today I got my blower hooked up to electric. I threw >the switch and WOW, THIS THING IS LOUD! Something has >to be wrong. As soon as I turn the power off its >quiet. So it must be the motor. Does anyone have any >suggestions. > >It's a kinetic blower. Motor is 3/4 hp single phase >110 volt. > >Thanks, >Bill > > >__________________________________________________ >Do You Yahoo!? >Yahoo! Messenger - Talk while you surf! It's FREE. >http://im.yahoo.com/ > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs] Building my Own - Parts needed From: "Hugh Knapton" <knapton@superaje.com> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 11:12:06 -0400   Jason   It might take me a few days to see what I have available. Our family has organs and parts stored in 3 separate locations. Although I have an idea of what we have, we have never actually bothered to do an inventory, and after 30 years (or more) one tends to forget what is there.   Hugh   >Hugh, >Yes! I know David VERY well. I talk with him regularly. >I haven't been in contact with him since the start of this project, >but hope to be soon. > >He has talked much of Fred and I have heard your name mentioned here >and there. > >Nice to hear from you. > >Now, what may you have that I could use? > >Thank you >Jason Comet >  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wiring and cables From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 08:24:53 -0700   My own preference is for soldered connections, but I realize that in some cases, as with solid-state relays, that might not be best. I have heard from some builders that the punch-down, insulation-displacing connectors are unreliable, but the telephone company (Pacific Bell, my former employer) has been using them for years, and they wouldn't if they were = not reliable. Also, I know of a man in Walnut Creek (?) California who has (had?) his entire Moller wired to punch-downs with good results. In my experience, the biggest problem with cabling is 'dead wires', where a particular conductor will go open for no apparent reason. The solution in my mind is to provide LOTS of spares, so that repairs would be simple and rapid. Another thing to remember is that when a cabled board needs to be removed for servicing, wires that go from there to other places can really get in the way. Run a seperate cable or cables to each removable board so that they can be removed easily. Good luck! Keep us informed!     At 10:04 10/15/2000 -0500, Robert W. Taylor wrote: >I would like to hear from the list on two issues: Cabling and = connectors. > >When I set up my organ, I will be using all new cable. Using an eight >rank compound chest as an example, should I run two cables from the = relay >to the chest for the notes, and one separate smaller cable for the stop >action? > >Since the ranks are all 61 notes, I could use two 64 conductor cables for >the two sets of primaries, and one 24 conductor for all sixteen stops = and >perhaps also the trem. > >In the above example, the cables will originate by connection the = junction >board. How should they be connected to the chest (or primaries)? Should >the chest have an external push down type connector? > >My intent is to be neat, reliable and close to standard practice. I am = not >interested necessarily in finding the least expensive method.     Regards, Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA NAWCC 140818 http://www.jps.net/rrloesch alternate mailto:cuckoobob@eudoramail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs] How is yourproject going? From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@home.com> Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2000 08:20:47 -0500   Kelvin Smith wrote: > > Steve, > > See my webpage at > > http://www.untraveledroad.com/PipeOrgan/Pipe_Organ.html The view across the console to the pipes is very impressive, Kelvin. I particularly like the rackup of the display pipes. The setting in the house indicates "not your average living room" appearance to very good advantage for an organ. I know you will enjoy this very much. F. Richard Burt effarbee@home.com  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] blower help From: "william baron" <bourdon_8@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 12:20:23 -0700 (PDT)   Hello again and thanks everyone for your replies.   Yes it is a century motor. I have figured out that it is a dual voltage motor. I had been running on 220. I simply switched a couple wires and now it's much quieter at its full speed.   Thanks again, Bill     --- Hugh Knapton <knapton@superaje.com> wrote: > Hello Bill > > Can you describe the "LOUD" noise?... and does it > disappear > immediately upon cutting the power, or does it take > a second or so? > > Hugh > > >Hello everyone > >Today I got my blower hooked up to electric. I > threw > >the switch and WOW, THIS THING IS LOUD! Something > has > >to be wrong. As soon as I turn the power off its > >quiet. So it must be the motor. Does anyone have > any > >suggestions. > > > >It's a kinetic blower. Motor is 3/4 hp single > phase > >110 volt. > > > >Thanks, > >Bill > > > > > >__________________________________________________ > >Do You Yahoo!? > >Yahoo! Messenger - Talk while you surf! It's FREE. > >http://im.yahoo.com/ > > > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and > builders of their own > >Residence Pipe Organs. > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > >Administration: > mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and > builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Messenger - Talk while you surf! It's FREE. http://im.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] blower help From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 15:27:38 EDT   Hi Bill- Great news on the motor. I had wondered if it was a century and connected at the wrong voltage. These Century repulsion start induction = run motors are tuff, and very long lasting. Keep the brushes free in the brusholders, and clean and lube the brush/necklace shifting mechanism once = in a while and they will last forever. Pay good attention as well to the = shaft bearing oil reservoirs and that the oil-carrying rings are free to rotate easily. Best of luck with the project! Regards, ---Roc LV Rockafellow  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] blower help From: "Bernard C. Nordmann" <bcnordmann@cdmnet.com> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 16:29:31 -0500   At 03:30 PM 10/14/00 -0700, you wrote: >I threw the switch and WOW, THIS THING IS LOUD! Something has >to be wrong. As soon as I turn the power off its >quiet. So it must be the motor. Does anyone have any >suggestions.   Another thought about a Century motor. Check the nameplate first to see if =   it is a "Repulsion-Induction" (RI) motor. If you can't read it look in the =   end bell. If you see a flat circular commutator (looks like a pie with way =   too many slices) it's an RI motor   A frequent failing of age of this type is that the brushes (which are supposed to be used only during starting) may not be retracting.   Even though they are not carrying current when in run mode, if they are in =   contact with the commutator, they make considerable noise a sort of = "zizzy" sound.   The condition is usually fixable. I've been threatening for some time to = do a write up about this. Let me know if I can help.   Regards to all,    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs] How is yourproject going? From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 20:49:50 -0500   Kelvin- Love the facade and 4 manual console, but where's the xylophone?!   Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: Pedal pipes From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 23:16:27 -0400   I was glad to see the recent note from Frank Vanaman <fvanaman@speakeasy.org> but was surprised that he didn't mention his experiments with the Haskell form of Bourdon, something that he had told = me about some time ago.   (For those who've not yet suffered the ever-recurring themes on some organ lists: organ shoes, Haskell basss pipes, and "should we change the list's emphasis?"... ;-)   Anyway, Frank did experiment with placing a tube, closed at the bottom = end, inside a Bourdon pipe such that its upper (open) end was a bit below the stopper. The effect was a reduction in pitch, as predicted by Mr. Haskell many years ago.   This might be another approach to getting a low pitch within a minimum = height.   Back for a moment to the Isle of Man instrument and its resultant bottom octave: my opus #1 residence organ (1960s) had a very small-scaled stopped wooden bass octave for its one and only rank in the "Positiv" division. The rank was a very nice open metal non-harmonic flute from a 1m Hinners tracker and the bottom octave was probably the stopped bass from a Salicional from a Barckhoff tracker. The effect of CC + GG was really quite effective as a resultant, but that died out going up the scale to about FF+C, where they just didn't "result". Of course, this was with pipes from the same set and not with a quint from a separate and softer = set.   If I were forced to use a resultant for the 16', I'd be tempted to try to carry the rank down as far as possible with real 16' pipes, switching to the resultant only for the lowest ones. Even then, I'd try mitering or Haskelling if at all possible.   So, Dr. Frank, have you done any more experiments with the Haskelled = Bourdon?   Larry Chace