DIYAPASON-L Digest #165 - Wednesday, October 18, 2000
 
Haskelled Bourdons
  by "james turner" <JTTUNER@webtv.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wiring and cables
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wiring and cables
  by "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wiring and cables
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wiring and cables
  by "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com>
Punchdown blocks
  by <Jadams4122@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Haskelled Bourdons From: "james turner" <JTTUNER@webtv.net> Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 00:09:57 -0500 (EST)   William Haskell wrote a lengthy paper with exact calculations and formulas for his Haskelled stopped bourdons. He is very clear on all of this. His paper (and other inventions) are available from the U.S. Patent Office for a few bucks. Write to the Patent Office in Washington, D.C. and ask for a list of his inventions (papers) and a price list. They are all worth having.....   Jim Turner    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wiring and cables From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 09:49:36 -0400       JFick@aol.com wrote: > > I certainly agree...punch blocks, commonly called 66-blocks, I believe = are > quite reliable. A good punchdown tool will cost some $40 US, and will > feature an automatic impact unit within. Home Depot now has them. = Color > coding is another feature when used with the proper 25-pair and 200-pair > phone cable. > > Common 66-blocks have 50 rows.   The 66 block had by and large been replaced by the 110 block. These are = higher density (more contacts per unit area) versions of the same thing.   Another big plus is that you can get preterminated cables. Not only is = phone run through this but 100Megabit local area networks.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wiring and cables From: "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com> Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 11:08:59 -0700   Ron Natalie wrote: ... > The 66 block had by and large been replaced by the 110 block... > Another big plus is that you can get preterminated cables.   Where does one get 66-block (or 110-block)? Are they available at surplus outlets, or should they be gotten new, at a 66/110-block store?   And, what is a "preterminated cable?" A low-experience organ builder wants to know. Maybe I should convert to mechanical action to avoid these complications? ;-)   Mac Hayes  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wiring and cables From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 14:29:53 -0400       Mac Hayes wrote: > > Ron Natalie wrote: > .. > > The 66 block had by and large been replaced by the 110 block... > > Another big plus is that you can get preterminated cables. > > Where does one get 66-block (or 110-block)? Are they available at > surplus outlets, or should they be gotten new, at a 66/110-block store?   You can find them at surplus places sometimes, but you're more likely to find what you want at a telecom supply place.   > > And, what is a "preterminated cable?" A low-experience organ builder > wants to know. Maybe I should convert to mechanical action to avoid > these complications? ;-) >   Well by itself, one of these termination blocks has essentially place to stick two wires. You have 50 wires comming in one side and 50 wires going out the other. Now you can buy them with the 50 wires already connected to a 50 contact connector. You can then buy long cables with the appropriate connector on the other end. This saves you some = time:   Imagine:   CHEST (magnets connected to the fanned out end of a 25 pair cable) | 25 pair cable | PRETERMINATED BLOCK   PRETERMINATED BLOCK | cable | Your relay (again connected to the free ends of the 25 pair cable) | cable | PRETERMINATED BLOCK   PRETERMINATED BLOCK | cable | CONSOLE       Now, you can use your punchdown tool to arbitrarily interconnect the = things on the BLOCKS above. Without the pretermination, you do the same thing except = you have to punch town the 50 conductors where the wires enter the block.   The other advantage of the connectors is they can be unhooked to route the = cables up to console or to otherwise make it easy to move things.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wiring and cables From: "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com> Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 13:57:58 -0700   Hey, everybody, look what I found! Well, really, thanks to Ron Natalie for doing the websearch, here are links with great pictures of 66M 50-pair punchdown blocks (and other configurations), multi-conductor cables with and without connectors, and more. The prices for cables with connectors made to custom lengths is amazingly low.   http://www.phonegeeks.com/66m50pairpun.html http://www.phonegeeks.com/concab.html   I haven't finished looking at what's available on the site, I'm back to browsing now...   Mac Hayes  
(back) Subject: Punchdown blocks From: <Jadams4122@aol.com> Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 17:13:09 EDT   Seimens makes the telephone punchdown blocks and Graybar Electric = which has outlets in most large cities sells them. Graybar also has a web page where they can be ordered. I would chose either the older 66 or newer 110 = but not mix although it wouldn't hurt. Even the 66's come in a newer shorter length. I have always stuck to the 50c (25pr) cable and 50 pin blocks just =   because they seemed to be easier to come by. Also works out well with the = 25 pair connectors. Even the punch blocks can be had with a wired 25 pair connector kind of piggybacked. There is also a very handy long connector available called a tap-50 which plugs into the 50 pin punch block. A word = of caution though. Some of the punch blocks are split down the middle, electrically, which gives twice the number of pins. If you have those = there are very inexpensive bridging clips available, also at Graybar. I use the punch blocks whereever I can. No more stripping, twisting, soldering. = Radio Shack also carrys a butt splice connector now for 22-26 gauge wire. Its = part no is 64-3073 but you will probably need their crimping tool #64-410. Also =   very handy for when you have to extend a wire because of reading the color =   wrong or whatever. If necessary, the blocks can be sawed through the = plastic and create two 25's or they can be sawed anywhere you like to create 61, = 73, or 85 pin blocks. Another consideration to keep in mind is that the telephone people = always work with pairs where organ people don't have to. For instance the = prewired connectors have the first pair (wh/bu & bu/wh) on pins 1 and 26 because = the pins are opposite each other. When you are wiring a block it is better to = put #1 on #1 one and #26 on #2. If you don't then you will be unwinding each pair unnecessarily. Doesn't make much difference as long as the very beginning and very end are the same color. That last sentence probably is more confusing than helpful.   John Adams