DIYAPASON-L Digest #174 - Monday, October 30, 2000
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  Refinishing wood pipes
  by "Bob North" <bnorth@intergate.ca>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Refinishing wood pipes
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Dumping Lead is Illegal ! ! !
  by "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Help; stiff 1" felt needed
  by "John Durgan" <kimbalman@earthlink.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Help; stiff 1" felt needed
  by "John Durgan" <kimbalman@earthlink.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Diapasons to Flutes Metamorphosis
  by "Jan S. VanDerStad" <dorian@nac.net>
Re: [Residence Organs] Diapasons to Flutes Metamorphosis
  by "s c bournias" <chrisbournias@hotmail.com>
Reed pipes questions
  by "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions
  by "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com>
[Residence Organs]  Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions
  by "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Reed pipes questions
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
The new kid on the Block has some questions.
  by <Menutia@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions
  by "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Diapasons to Flutes Metamorphosis
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes  questions
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  The new kid on the Block has some questions.
  by <mts@intergrafix.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  The new kid on the Block has some  questions.
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Organ Transplants (was: "The new kid ...")
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  The new kid on the Block has some  questions.
  by <Menutia@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Refinishing wood pipes From: "Bob North" <bnorth@intergate.ca> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 02:02:38 -0600     >Daniel, I have been having fun refinishing the wooden pipes from my 1923 2m/3r Frazee organ. I started by washing them with Murphy's Oil Soap, rising clean and letting them dry. Then I used french polish (shellac) >and have put on a number of coats, until the pipes have a nice gloss finish. The pipes have a great finish and will look great on display, as none will be hidden. A word of caution: shellac is diluted in alcohol, which is HIGHLY FLAMABLE. Use only in a well ventilated area, (like outside). Safety gear, like gloves, mask and eye protection are a must. Good luck, I really enjoyed working with mine. Now........the metal = pipes. Regards.........Bob > > >>I am about to refinish some of my wood Pipes.I bought shellac >>What do I do to refinish these pipes, ANd what do I do when I get near >>the mouths.I dont want to start till I get some advice >> Thank you >> Daniel WH >> "2000 E. Power Biggs Fellow Recipient" >> >> >>DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >>Residence Pipe Organs. >>HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >>List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >>Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >> >> >> >    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Refinishing wood pipes From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 06:33:38 -0800       Bob North wrote: > > >Daniel, I have been having fun refinishing the wooden pipes from my = 1923 > 2m/3r Frazee organ. I started by washing them with Murphy's Oil Soap, > rising clean and letting them dry.   Another thing that can remove crud effectively without damanging things (works better on consoles and stuff that may have layers of grease and wax) is mineral spirits.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Dumping Lead is Illegal ! ! ! From: "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 07:54:25 -0500   Al wrote:   >Putting any kind of heavy metal into a landfill is now illegal. Besides, = I >find that I get a healthy amount of cash from the metal recycler.   Thanks for the information Al. I was not aware of this. I generally take metal to the scrap yard but it was a situation of having the pipes along with regular trash and I only had enough time to make it to the landfill station, and I knew the cost of disposal was minimal. Both places close before I get off work and I just happened to be off early that day for other reasons and just had a little time left. If I would have known it was illegal I would have waited. Or for that matter I probably would have tried to advertise the pipes had I known there would have been such reaction created to disposing of them.   Now on to some of the more interesting subjects of this weekend.   God Bless, Eric    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Help; stiff 1" felt needed From: "John Durgan" <kimbalman@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 07:14:00 -0600   YOu are right. of course. The felt goes on first then the leather. The compressed felt keeps the leather tight agaonst the inside of the pipe. I have had great success not using leather at all. The felt makes a tight enough seal, and is a lot easier to put the stopper in and a whole lot easier to tune.   John -----Original Message----- From: Henry Paff <paffh@yahoo.com> To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Date: Thursday, October 26, 2000 11:33 PM Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Help; stiff 1" felt needed     >Hi John, > >I've always thought one needed to use leather to get a >good seal on pipe stoppers. But it sounds like felt >can be used, is that right? If so it would be a lot >easier to fit than leather. > >Thanks, Lou Paff > >--- John Durgan <kimbalman@earthlink.net> wrote: >> Hi Again >> >> Here is the name and address and phone >> >> Southeastern Felt Company >> p.o. box 1368 >> Concord North Carolina >> >> phone: 1-800-438-2252 >> >> They made special pipe stopper felt to exact specs. >> It was perfect. I have >> used them for a number of felts of special thickness >> and density >> >> John R. Durgan >> Mississippi >> -----Original Message----- >> From: KriderSM@aol.com <KriderSM@aol.com> >> To: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >> <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> >> Date: Thursday, October 26, 2000 9:24 AM >> Subject: [Residence Organs] Help; stiff 1" felt >> needed >> >> >> >Greetings all, >> >Does anyone know where I can purchase stiff 1" felt >> for rebuilding a Wicks >> >pedalboard? >> > >> >Thanks, >> >Stan Krider >> > >> >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and >> builders of their own >> >Residence Pipe Organs. >> >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >> >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >> >Administration: >> mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >> > >> > >> >> >> DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and >> builders of their own >> Residence Pipe Organs. >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >> > > >__________________________________________________ >Do You Yahoo!? >Yahoo! Messenger - Talk while you surf! It's FREE. >http://im.yahoo.com/ > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Help; stiff 1" felt needed From: "John Durgan" <kimbalman@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 07:16:42 -0600   Yes a lot of folks use cork, it has the main disadvantage of not being resilient enough , and gets compressed too quickly. Good woven felt maintains its integrity a whole lot longer.   John -----Original Message----- From: VEAGUE <dutchorgan@svs.net> To: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, October 27, 2000 5:08 AM Subject: Fw: [Residence Organs] Help; stiff 1" felt needed     >Cork is used also as a wrap for the bung-sides. > >Rick > > >----- Original Message ----- >From: Henry Paff <paffh@yahoo.com> >To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> >Sent: Friday, October 27, 2000 12:33 AM >Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Help; stiff 1" felt needed > > >> Hi John, >> >> I've always thought one needed to use leather to get a >> good seal on pipe stoppers. But it sounds like felt >> can be used, is that right? If so it would be a lot >> easier to fit than leather. >> >> Thanks, Lou Paff >> >> --- John Durgan <kimbalman@earthlink.net> wrote: >> > Hi Again >> > >> > Here is the name and address and phone >> > >> > Southeastern Felt Company >> > p.o. box 1368 >> > Concord North Carolina >> > >> > phone: 1-800-438-2252 >> > >> > They made special pipe stopper felt to exact specs. >> > It was perfect. I have >> > used them for a number of felts of special thickness >> > and density >> > >> > John R. Durgan >> > Mississippi >> > -----Original Message----- >> > From: KriderSM@aol.com <KriderSM@aol.com> >> > To: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >> > <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> >> > Date: Thursday, October 26, 2000 9:24 AM >> > Subject: [Residence Organs] Help; stiff 1" felt >> > needed >> > >> > >> > >Greetings all, >> > >Does anyone know where I can purchase stiff 1" felt >> > for rebuilding a Wicks >> > >pedalboard? >> > > >> > >Thanks, >> > >Stan Krider >> > > >> > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and >> > builders of their own >> > >Residence Pipe Organs. >> > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >> > >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >> > >Administration: >> > mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >> > > >> > > >> > >> > >> > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and >> > builders of their own >> > Residence Pipe Organs. >> > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >> > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >> > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >> > >> >> >> __________________________________________________ >> Do You Yahoo!? >> Yahoo! Messenger - Talk while you surf! It's FREE. >> http://im.yahoo.com/ >> >> DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >> Residence Pipe Organs. >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >> > > > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Diapasons to Flutes Metamorphosis From: "Jan S. VanDerStad" <dorian@nac.net> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 08:40:54 -0500   Good Morning, Listers   While on this subject, I've heard of organ builders who will convert a large scale diapason into a Rohrflute. Has anybody on the list heard such a rank first-hand? What does it really sound like?   Jan S. VanDerStad  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Diapasons to Flutes Metamorphosis From: "s c bournias" <chrisbournias@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 11:25:07 EST   <html><DIV> <P><BR><BR></P></DIV>i heard an experimental pipe using a diapason 8 = #43-40 scale....not my cup of tea....steve bournias <DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV>&gt;From: "Jan S. VanDerStad" <DORIAN@NAC.NET> <DIV></DIV>&gt;Reply-To: "Residence Organ List" <DIYAPASON-L@PIPECHAT.ORG> <DIV></DIV>&gt;To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@PIPECHAT.ORG> <DIV></DIV>&gt;Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Diapasons to Flutes = Metamorphosis <DIV></DIV>&gt;Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 08:40:54 -0500 <DIV></DIV>&gt; <DIV></DIV>&gt;Good Morning, Listers <DIV></DIV>&gt; <DIV></DIV>&gt;While on this subject, I've heard of organ builders who = will convert a <DIV></DIV>&gt;large scale diapason into a Rohrflute. Has anybody on the = list heard <DIV></DIV>&gt;such a rank first-hand? What does it really sound like? <DIV></DIV>&gt; <DIV></DIV>&gt;Jan S. VanDerStad <DIV></DIV>&gt; <DIV></DIV>&gt;DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of = their own <DIV></DIV>&gt;Residence Pipe Organs. <DIV></DIV>&gt;HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>&gt;List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>&gt;Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org <DIV></DIV>&gt; <DIV></DIV><p><hr>Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at <a = href=3D"http://www.hotmail.com">http://www.hotmail.com</a>.<p>Share = information about yourself, create your own public profile at <a = href=3D"http://profiles.msn.com">http://profiles.msn.com = </a>.<br></p></html>  
(back) Subject: Reed pipes questions From: "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 15:17:17 -0500   Hello Friends,   Anyone out there have experience with reed pipes? I have a couple questions as I'm not very knowledgeable in this area.   I have the possibility of (3) 8' trumpets available to me from a friend in the area.   1. Estey, 1/2 length bass resonators, for about 4" wind.   2. Hillgreen Lane, Full length bass resonators, for about 4-4 1/2" wind.   3. Shantz, Full length bass resonators, for about 6-6 1/2" wind.   My organ is running on about 3" wind although I could easily get 4-4 1/2" in the chamber for the reed(s).   My two main questions are:   1. Would it be worth striving for the Full length bass resonators or wouldn't that be much of a concern in a residence?   2. If I did decide to go with Full length bass resonators could the Shantz trumpet be made to work on around 4" wind without alot of trouble (modifications), as I think these are nicer pipes than the Hillgreen Lane pipes?   Eventually I would like to have a 16, 8, 4 unified reed. For the 16' pipes I would definitely need to go 1/2 length. I don't think I'd want to use 1/4 length here.   So I would be running 16'- 1/2 length, 8'- Full length or 16'- 1/2 length, 8'- 1/2 length.   Any ideas anyone?   Thanks, Eric  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions From: "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 14:36:26 CST   Dear Eric and List:   >My two main questions are: > >1. Would it be worth striving for the Full length bass resonators or >wouldn't that be much of a concern in a residence? > I have full length bass resonators on my 8' rank and I'm glad I have them. = Remember in a home the acoustics are usually not as good as they would be = in a church so full length is the way to go. 1/2 length resonators would weaken the resonance and thus make them sound more "Kazoo-like". Space isn't usually a big concern because full length reeds can be mitred and mitred and mitred.   >2. If I did decide to go with Full length bass resonators could the >Shantz trumpet be made to work on around 4" wind without alot of >trouble (modifications), as I think these are nicer pipes than the >Hillgreen Lane pipes? >   My reed was voiced for around 5-1/2" of wind and seems to work fine on = under 4" without any modification whatsoever other than tuning. Go for the Shantz! The Hillgreen Lane doesn't sound better? I'm surprised.   Bart Kleineweber Chicago, IL http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org/webpages/kleineweber/ _________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.   Share information about yourself, create your own public profile at http://profiles.msn.com.    
(back) Subject: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions From: "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 15:59:57 -0500   Bart wrote:   >> >I have full length bass resonators on my 8' rank and I'm glad I have >them. Remember in a home the acoustics are usually not as good as >they would be in a church so full length is the way to go. 1/2 >length resonators would weaken the resonance and thus make them >sound more "Kazoo-like". Space isn't usually a big concern because >full length reeds can be mitred and mitred and mitred.   That makes sense. I understand what you mean about the bass in a home not being as well supported.     >..... the Shantz! The Hillgreen Lane doesn't sound better? I'm = surprised. > >   I don't know about sound. I hesitate to blow into these pipes. I just know the apparent quality of the Shantz seemed better than the Hillgreen Lane pipes. I guess not being as familiar with H.G. I don't quite know where they fit in as far as quality and sound goes. My 12- 16' bass Gedackt pipes are from this same H.G. organ and I consider their quality inferior(sloppily made) compared to the other pipes I have and have been around.   The H.G. Trumpet pipes are mitered though while the Shantz pipes aren't. The mitering would be an advantage to me. But I think whichever sounds better would make the choice.   Thanks, Eric    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 17:35:08 -0500   Eric Sagmuller asked about these three potential additions to his = instrument:   >1. Estey, 1/2 length bass resonators, for about 4" wind. > >2. Hillgreen Lane, Full length bass resonators, for about 4-4 1/2" wind. > >3. Shantz, Full length bass resonators, for about 6-6 1/2" wind.   From a strictly historic point of view, there are some possibly = interesting details:   1. Estey, to the best of my knowledge, did not build 1/2-length = resonators, but they did use a clever scheme akin to the Haskell basses they used on flue pipes. For reeds, they'd have a short (about 1/2 length) conical resonator over which they would suspend a cylindrical addition that was closed at the top. The result, if you do the geometry, is a conical pipe that is mitered over on top of itself. Eric, if these pipes are of this form, then you'd have a full-length bass, not 1/2 length!   2. Hillgreen-Lane did not built their own reed pipes (or, possibly, even their own flue pipes), and so the H-L reeds are from some supply company. Schopps is close to H-L (they were in the same town, I believe), and so they pipes may be from Schopps. Don't discount them! If they are already mitered such that they fit in your organ chamber, then that is a clear advantage!   3. The Schantz set, on 6" pressure, is possibly the most difficult of the three to use in your instrument.   Happy Trumpetting!   Larry Chace      
(back) Subject: The new kid on the Block has some questions. From: <Menutia@aol.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 17:36:34 EST   Greetings fellow organ enthusiasts.   First let me introduce myself. My name is Michael Garay.   I'm a young (soon to be) organ owner in the Chicago area.   I am planning my first transplant, and I am looking for some specifics to watch out for in the dismantlement, move, and install. I am up to date on =   pipe crates, and storage, but I am looking for those little things that = often get forgotten when in the process of moving.   I have been asking around to members of the various organ clubs and lists = for their advice. What's yours? What did you wish someone told you before attempting your projects?   What do you wish you did differently?   Michael Garay The new kid on the block.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions From: "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 14:39:58 -0800   Bart Kleineweber wrote: > > .. Space isn't usually a big concern because full length reeds can > be mitred and mitred and mitred.     Does anybody here have experience with mitering techniques, ie, 90-degree angles vs. 60-degree or even 45-degree angles, as far as the sound is affected?   Mac Hayes (I wanted to write "mitreing" but the spell checker said "mitering")  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Diapasons to Flutes Metamorphosis From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 17:56:07 -0600   At 10/30/00 08:40 AM, you wrote: >Good Morning, Listers > >While on this subject, I've heard of organ builders who will convert a >large scale diapason into a Rohrflute. Has anybody on the list heard >such a rank first-hand? What does it really sound like? > >Jan S. VanDerStad   Greetings, Jan!   I have heard such stops...and they can be quite lovely -- or perfectly horrid. It all depends on the amount of work and artistry that their (re)voicer/builder puts into them.   It is quite possible that one would have to spend as much or more time and effort to transform an old diapason into a rohrflute (especially considering fabricating the caps with chimneys) if one is determined to do it well. To make the old pipes into a metal bourdon (sans chimneys) would not require *as* much work, obviously.   If one simply cuts the pipes off and makes stoppers/caps for them, you can almost bet the result will *not* be a stellar example (in the same way = that old strings cut off do not make proper principals or mutations without = much further rescaling/revoicing)!   There is a great satisfaction in making old pipes new again in another = form -- but much more work than many realize is necessary to achieve truly fine results. Perhaps this is a principle that DIY organbuilders can exploit (whereas "commercial" organbuilders often cannot -- for them, it is = usually more cost effective to work with new pipework ordered to the proper specs and save the labor costs).   Cheers!   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR            
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 18:22:13 -0600   At 10/30/00 02:39 PM, Mac wrote:   >Does anybody here have experience with mitering techniques, ie, >90-degree angles vs. 60-degree or even 45-degree angles, as far as the >sound is affected?   Hi, Mac!   You seem to be speaking of mitering the *tops* of the reed pipes. This is not typical practice (though there *are* exceptions), as the sound emitted from a reed comes from its top -- and if you aim some of the pipes in different directions than others in the set, you will likely get obvious differences in the aural results. For one or two odd pipes of a set, especially when they are enclosed, you can likely make it work alright *if the miters are not severe* -- though the mitered pipes will likely need to be regulated slightly differently than the rest of the set in order to match their unmitered neighbors.   Also, in most reed pipes, the top of the resonator is the heaviest portion of the resonator -- this presents difficulties in supporting the pipes to prevent their collapse over time.   All this is why reed mitering usually takes the form of "knuckling" at the bottom of the resonator just above the block -- mitering reeds in this way (even SEVERELY!) will result in little, if any, difference in the sound produced.   Flue pipes are another matter entirely, as most of the sound of a flue is produced at the mouth -- aiming the tops of flue pipes one way or the = other has a negligible difference in the sound produced.   Hope this helps a little --   Cheers!   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] The new kid on the Block has some questions. From: <mts@intergrafix.net> Date: Tue, 31 Oct 2000 01:01:00 GMT   > What did you wish someone told you before attempting your projects?   Dear young future organ owner:   Welcome. Organ owners are a curious lot, but the finished product is beyond belief. You'll be happy with your work if you have patience, = diligence, and details, details, DETAILS! Anyway, you've come to the right place. = These guys rock out royal for advice and help. Again, welcome. Don't overlook or shortcut anything, especially in the move. Take = your time and be careful with each component. Save the screws...every last one. =   Trust me on this. I've had to rebuild an 1830's deal, no small task. Every = bit of information you don't have to remember is that much not forgotten and guessed at later. And with how my brain works, I need all the help I can = get in terms of remembering details. Mark anything that comes apart. This seems dumb, and you may think, = "I'll know where it goes." I tried this and wound up staring at thousands of = parts with no markings all at once before me. It's scary. I even mark the size = screws I take out. It makes reassembly a snap doing it this way. Details, = details, details. Disconnect and mark wires, don't just chop them. Remember your = color code, if there is one. Remember to take as much information as you can before dismantling = and during. I use a videocassette recorder. It helps during the rebuild if something wierd comes up- you just flip in the tape and see the original installation. Be thorough. I also like to use the tape later to show = people the history of the organ. Zoom and panning is good, I start in the blower room = and work my way through each part of the organ. Then I get shots during = dismantling of different times like the chest before, then pipes removed, then other = stuff out, etc to show how it all came apart visually. 35mm film gets = expensive, and you could get lots of time on a $4 video (I sometimes use two or three in larger installations...details, details, details). Once I even realized I = left a missing unit in the church thanks to the video. I even do a last shot of = the empty place, all organ gone just to make sure all is as it should be and I =   don't get blamed for ripped carpets or holes in the wall, etc (it has = happened). Finally, watch your back. It's easy to pop a disc or something = lifting heavy things (a century blower motor did mine in). Take your time, enjoy = the work, and think... details, details, details, details, details, small = things, details de- well, you get the point. Now get to it.     Best of Luck,   Chris Malocheski Malocheski Theater Systems      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] The new kid on the Block has some questions. From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 20:00:52 -0600   Hi Michael,   One excellent suggestion was take loads of pictures. This is something I wish I had done as it answers questions as to how some pipe or other items =   were supported and where that odd piece of lumber than you cannot = Identify, but looks important belongs. Also if you can single lace cables before you =   disconnect them it will save you lots of time later when you get ready to re-connect. Many older organs do not have color coded cables and when you have a bundle of wires that are all white it can be daunting.   Good luck and let me know how you're doing.   regards,   Jon   PS ..Michael deserves your kind thoughts and good wishes...he is also in broadcasting and works for the "mouse"    
(back) Subject: Organ Transplants (was: "The new kid ...") From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 22:40:11 -0500   To the other very good ideas already expressed, let me attempt a few = additions.   1. When unscrewing components, you can often save the screws in a plastic sandwich bag (with zip closure) that you then tape to the component. Or, place all of the (well marked) bags into a box for safe-keeping.   2. Or, use some masking tape -- lay down a piece of tape sticky side up = and stick the screws into its left half, perhaps alternating the screws, but leaving a bit of space between then. Then take the right half and fold it over the screws, pressing down between them to capture the screws. Mark the result and tape it to the component. Do not assume that all of the screws are of the same size, even those in close proximity. Remember that masking tape dries out after a "long" time. (See point #11, below.)   3. To mark matching components, write a (unique!) number on each half such that the numbers are hidden when the parts are re-assembled. If you have to mark on the surface, use something like a grease pencil that is durable and also removable. (If you use India ink and a quill pen, folks will think the marks are original historic markings!)   4. If the organ has electric action, of whatever type, with cotton-covered wires, you will not be able to re-use those cables that you disconnect, at least not legally. Cables that remain connected are "grandfathered" in = the Electric Code (or at least they *used* to be), but cables that are disconnected must be replaced with ones having approved insulation, which for practical purposes means PVC (such as telephone wiring). Double-cotton-covered wires are specifically disallowed for reconnection.   5. Be sure that your pipe trays can be moved through doorways, hallways, and other possible difficult locations without you having to tip them on their side, thereby spilling out your carefully packed pipework. Sometimes, it is better to make more but smaller crates. While I like 2' by 6' trays (they fit my truck nicely), I'm also seen 18" square by 6' "coffins" with an internal dividing "floor" that are quite easy to move through doorways and around corners.   6. Get someone to help who has done it before!   7. Prepare to be dirty and tired, and know when to take a rest.   8. It will rain, or else it will snow. Be prepared to cover things.   9. Be sure you have sufficient storage space available into which you can unload things easily so that you can try to get the rental truck back before you get charged for another day!   10. Even if you don't have to rent a truck (because you or a friend has one), be doubly sure that you have enough capacity to haul all of the material. Pipe organs, when disassembled, expand rapidly. Have *lots* of heavy blankets to wrap things and lots of rope to tie things down. The load will shift. Zinc pipes need to be placed safely and securely or else you'll never be able to tune them sharp enough.   11. "Pretend" that it will be at least a year before you get to = re-assemble anything and assume that you will forget everything that isn't written = down or photographed or videotaped.   This all brings back fond memories of college days, when I turned out to = be the *only* one dumb enough to show up as the "crew" to help out a fellow student who had bought an ex-theatre organ that needed to be removed from = a church. It was 50 miles away, and the truck was large, but so was the console -- and we had only a little dolly and one ramp. At the end, in = the dark, trying to unload everything, one of us almost took a head-first fall from the tailgate into some nasty bushes. Don't try that at home!   Larry Chace      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: [Residence Organs] Reed pipes questions From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 23:11:54 EST   Good evening, it's almost Halloween, I have been told 45 degrees is the correct way to mitre metal pipes and 90 degrees on bordons? I don't know = the reason for the difference though.   Have a happy Halloween. Dennis  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] The new kid on the Block has some questions. From: <Menutia@aol.com> Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 23:14:00 EST   In a message dated 10/30/00 8:04:17 PM Central Standard Time, opus1100@catoe.org writes:     > PS ..Michael deserves your kind thoughts and good wishes...he is also in =   > broadcasting and works for the "mouse" >   Thanks, Jon....