DIYAPASON-L Digest #294 - Thursday, April 5, 2001
 
Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by <HALTGG@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@home.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by "Jon Calvo" <jcalvo@mail.state.tn.us>
Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by <HALTGG@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com>
Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs
  by "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com>
 

(back) Subject: Wurlizer Residence Organs From: <HALTGG@aol.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 11:22:45 EDT     --part1_4a.13df42ac.27fde7c5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   TO: Al Sefl Bum Czech? I know a lot of people looking to avoid you. Thanks for the input. I had the console refinished before I stored the = organ. It looked like the original finish had turned green. The finished product = was amazing. It is quartered walnut and quite a handsome piece of furniture. = The pipes are mitered to 8' and the flutes are nice enough to display. My hope = is to be able to fit everything in the attic area of this old stone house I have. The roof line is + 8' in the center but the pitch (it's a mansard = roof) drops off to 4' at 12' wide. The original print layout and the boards the chests bolted to are going to have to be modified. I know very little = about organs. I collect antique automatic/player instruments. Common sense tells = me the placement of the chests should be; smaller pipes placed closer to the =   swell shades than the larger stuff. I am hoping I don't have to raise the roof line. Time will tell. Thanks again. Hal   --part1_4a.13df42ac.27fde7c5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>TO: Al Sefl <BR>Bum Czech? I know a lot of people looking to avoid you. <BR>Thanks for the input. I had the console refinished before I stored the = organ. <BR>It looked like the original finish had turned green. The finished = product was <BR>amazing. It is quartered walnut and quite a handsome piece of = furniture. The <BR>pipes are mitered to 8' and the flutes are nice enough to display. My = hope is <BR>to be able to fit everything in the attic area of this old stone house = I <BR>have. The roof line is + 8' in the center but the pitch (it's a = mansard roof) <BR>drops off to 4' at 12' wide. The original print layout and the boards = the <BR>chests bolted to are going to have to be modified. I know very little = about <BR>organs. I collect antique automatic/player instruments. Common sense = tells me <BR>the placement of the chests should be; &nbsp;smaller pipes placed = closer to the <BR>swell shades than the larger stuff. I am hoping I don't have to raise = the <BR>roof line. Time will tell. Thanks again. Hal </FONT></HTML>   --part1_4a.13df42ac.27fde7c5_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 11:41:49 -0400   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1225637185=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii" ; format=3D"flowed"   At 11:22 AM -0400 4/5/01, HALTGG@aol.com wrote: >Common sense tells me >the placement of the chests should be; smaller pipes placed closer to = the >swell shades than the larger stuff.   I was told the opposite on this. By placing the treble pipes in the back of the chamber they will mix better with the lower frequency pipes as the treble pipes are more directional. Also the high frequencies tend to be more penetrating. At least that's my understanding.   How about an "expert" explanation.   Happy organ building, Eric   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1225637185=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Content-Type: text/enriched; charset=3D"us-ascii"   At 11:22 AM -0400 4/5/01, HALTGG@aol.com wrote:   <excerpt><fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>Common sense tells me   the placement of the chests should be; smaller pipes placed closer to the   swell shades than the larger stuff.   </smaller></fontfamily></excerpt><fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>   I was told the opposite on this. By placing the treble pipes in the back of the chamber they will mix better with the lower frequency pipes as the treble pipes are more directional. Also the high frequencies tend to be more penetrating. At least that's my understanding.     How about an "expert" explanation.     Happy organ building,   Eric </smaller></fontfamily>   --=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D_-1225637185=3D=3D_ma=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@home.com> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 11:50:54 -0500   Eric Sagmuller wrote: > > > At 11:22 AM -0400 4/5/01, HALTGG@aol.com wrote: > > > > Common sense tells me > > the placement of the chests should be; smaller pipes placed > > closer to the > > swell shades than the larger stuff. > >I was told the opposite on this. By placing the treble pipes in the back >of the chamber they will mix better with the lower frequency pipes as >the treble pipes are more directional. Also the high frequencies tend >to be more penetrating. At least that's my understanding. Well, I care for a couple of organs by the same builder: Schantz. The organ in my own church has a completely exposed Great and Pedal (most of it). They placed the Mixture-IV along the rear of the Great chest. In another organ I take care of, they placed the Mixture-IV on the front of the chest. The organ in my own church is a beautiful example of an organ that blends well and has marvelous clarity. The organ with the mixture on the front sounds well until you bring the mixture on. You can only use this mixture when you are at fortissimo (FF) or above. There is nothing subtle about this mixture, and it is absolutely useless until you reach climactic tonal proportions. Oh, ...I guess it would be okayu in some of the large preludes and fugues in the baroque style where the tree-top sound works well, but I was thinking of general service music and accompaniment for choirs and hymn singing. The question started out with a subject related to WurliTzer residence organs. Do they have mixtures on those organs? F. Richard Burt effarbee@home.com  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 10:49:18 -0700   My learning, too! In many home installations, the larger bass pipes can = be used to form a 'wall' between the chamber area and listening area. As = most home installations used to be auditorium/theatre/church installations, the trebles are usually much too loud for a home. What say the experts?     At 11:41 AM 4/5/01 -0400, Eric Sagmuller wrote: >At 11:22 AM -0400 4/5/01, HALTGG@aol.com wrote: >>Common sense tells me >>the placement of the chests should be; smaller pipes placed closer to = the >>swell shades than the larger stuff. >> > >I was told the opposite on this. By placing the treble pipes in the back >of the chamber they will mix better with the lower frequency pipes as the >treble pipes are more directional. Also the high frequencies tend to be >more penetrating. At least that's my understanding. > >How about an "expert" explanation. > >Happy organ building, >Eric   Regards, Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA NAWCC 140818 http://www.jps.net/rrloesch alternate mailto:cuckoobob@eudoramail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 13:06:24 -0700   At 11:50 AM 4/5/01 -0500, F. Richard Burt wrote: >The question started out with a subject >related to WurliTzer residence organs. Do they have mixtures on >those organs?     The only non-theatre Wurlitzer I've ever seen is an RJ-8, and it didn't have a mixture. The only Wurlitzer I've ever seen WITH a mixture is the Radio City Kimball-designed Wurlitzer, which is definately a theatre = organ. Go figure... ;-)     Regards, Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA NAWCC 140818 http://www.jps.net/rrloesch alternate mailto:cuckoobob@eudoramail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: "Jon Calvo" <jcalvo@mail.state.tn.us> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 15:16:01 -0500   --=3D_D289299E.BADB7FCF Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3DUS-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   ** For Your Eyes Only ** ** High Priority **   I recall a wurlitzer non theater organ it was for sale in the AGO mag =3D seems it was a straight stop rail was in up state NY it looked like a =3D tubular pneumatic kind of organ I think it was about 10 ranks=3D20 was a nice looking organ what what it was I don't remember it having a =3D Mixture however the reason I remember it I was going to purchase it for my = =3D home and them I found the Austin/ kilgen I have now it was a sweet looking = =3D organ I think I remember the date being 1908 to 1915=3D20 my recollections on a wurlitzer organ , wurlitzer made a fine organ=3D20 and i don't car what anyone says for there time the old Wurlitzer orgatron = =3D organ were dinamite i had one for years great pipe organ console=3D20 and the sweetest tone you ever herd=3D20 this is my oppinion=3D20 john   >>> rrloesch@jps.net 04/05/01 03:06PM >>>=3D20 At 11:50 AM 4/5/01 -0500, F. Richard Burt wrote:=3D20 >The question started out with a subject=3D20 >related to WurliTzer residence organs. Do they have mixtures on=3D20 >those organs?=3D20     The only non-theatre Wurlitzer I've ever seen is an RJ-8, and it = didn't=3D20 have a mixture. The only Wurlitzer I've ever seen WITH a mixture is = the=3D20 Radio City Kimball-designed Wurlitzer, which is definately a theatre =3D organ.=3D20 Go figure...=3D20 ;-)=3D20     Regards,=3D20 Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA=3D20 NAWCC 140818=3D20 http://www.jps.net/rrloesch=3D20 alternate mailto:cuckoobob@eudoramail.com=3D20     DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own=3D20 Residence Pipe Organs.=3D20 HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org=3D20 List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org=3D20 Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org=3D20   --=3D_D289299E.BADB7FCF Content-Type: text/html; charset=3DISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Description: HTML   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" = http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type=3D > <META content=3D3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3612.1706"' name=3D3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY style=3D3D"FONT: 8pt MS Sans Serif; MARGIN-LEFT: 2px; MARGIN-TOP: = =3D 2px"> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D1>I recall a wurlitzer non theater organ it was for = sale =3D in the=3D20 AGO mag seems it was a straight stop rail was in up state NY it looked =3D like a=3D20 tubular pneumatic kind of organ I think it was about 10 ranks = </FONT></DIV>=3D   <DIV><FONT size=3D3D1>was a nice looking organ what what it was I don't = =3D remember it=3D20 having a Mixture however the reason I remember it I was going to purchase = =3D it for=3D20 my home and them I found the Austin/ kilgen I have now it was a sweet =3D looking=3D20 organ I think I remember the date being 1908 to 1915 </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D1>my recollections on a wurlitzer organ , wurlitzer = made =3D a fine=3D20 organ </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D1>and i don't car what anyone says for there time the = =3D old=3D20 Wurlitzer orgatron organ were dinamite i had one for years great pipe =3D organ=3D20 console </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D1>and the sweetest tone you ever herd </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D1>this is my oppinion </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D1>john</FONT><BR><BR>&gt;&gt;&gt; rrloesch@jps.net =3D 04/05/01=3D20 03:06PM &gt;&gt;&gt; <BR>At 11:50 AM 4/5/01 -0500, F. Richard Burt =3D wrote:=3D20 <BR>&gt;The question started out with a subject <BR>&gt;related to =3D WurliTzer=3D20 residence organs. Do they have mixtures on <BR>&gt;those organs? = <BR><BR><B=3D R>The=3D20 only non-theatre Wurlitzer I've ever seen is an RJ-8, and it didn't =3D <BR>have a=3D20 mixture. The only Wurlitzer I've ever seen WITH a mixture is the <BR>Radio = =3D City=3D20 Kimball-designed Wurlitzer, which is definately a theatre organ. = <BR>Go=3D20 figure... <BR>;-) <BR><BR><BR>Regards, <BR>Bob, in beautiful Lake =3D County,=3D20 California, USA <BR>NAWCC 140818 <BR><U><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.jps.net/rrloesch">http://www.jps.net/rrloesch</A></U>=3D20=3D   <BR>alternate <U><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:cuckoobob@eudoramail.com">mailto:cuckoobob@eudoramail.com<= /A=3D ></U>=3D20 <BR><BR><BR>DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of =3D their own=3D20 <BR>Residence Pipe Organs. <BR>HOMEPAGE : <U><A=3D20 href=3D3D"http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org/">http://www.diyapason.pipechat= .o=3D rg</A></U>=3D20 <BR>List: <U><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org">mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org<= /A=3D ></U>=3D20 <BR>Administration: <U><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org">mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipec= ha=3D t.org</A></U>=3D20 <BR><BR></DIV></BODY></HTML>   --=3D_D289299E.BADB7FCF--  
(back) Subject: Wurlizer Residence Organs From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 17:13:18 EDT   First things first. Wurlitzer residence organs were voiced in a different =   manner than their theatre organs. The small treble pipes are not out = there screeming to fill a theatre sized volume of air. These organs evolved = from the Romantic Period of organbuilding and are heavy in power around the = 8'CC to 4' tenor C octave. By placing the larger pipes in back and letting the =   trebles have a line of sight to the shutters you will get a more balanced sound. Do not bury the trebles.   Even theatre organs should be done this way for a home installation. Bass =   notes can carry well through any structure, it is almost always the treble =   notes that get eaten by carpets, draperies, seat cushions, toupees, = clothing, etc. When a theatre organ is put into a home installation the trebles can =   always be tamed with a little decent voicing. The whole organ will most likely need terracing, regulation, and a good tuning anyway as these three =   steps were mostly passed over in the slap-dash installations given to = theatre organs in the first place. For organs heavy in the 8'CC range you cannot hide the trebles without further unbalancing the sound toward the muddy = end of the spectrum.   Mixtures in more classical styled instruments are meant to top off an = organ and give it brilliance and definition. In some churches they will work = well in the mf range and not be obtrusive while in others they will take your = head off unless you are already at ff. It may even be the same mixture by the same builder in both instances. So, a generalization about the use and usefulness of mixtures would not be definitive. That being said, in a = large listening area with a low pressure organ I would not want the instrument = to be without at least one. Low pressure reeds just do not have the punch of =   power and harmonic structure needed to rise over an FF registration. A properly executed Cornet Mixture would. A small two rank mixture finds = use in giving definition to a registration at lower volume levels on the = Pedal, Choir, or Swell. For the home organs my clients like to have the mixtures =   out in the open, polished like the chrome bumper of a '53 DeSoto, and be sonically commanding without being painful. There are a couple of = instances where I personally would have buried the Cornet Mixture in back, BUT, the client is always right!   The Radio City Music Hall speaks into such a vast volume that mixtures = were thought to be needed by Parmentier (spelling?) when he designed the organ specifications. Turns out with tiny shutter openings that speak into = cement walls and deep chambers, nothing would have helped. Today when you hear = that Mighty Wurlitzer sound of the RCMH it is amplified through the house sound =   system. The Kimball specs are what gave that organ the mixtures, = Wurlitzer would have considered the idea silly on a theatre organ but they assumed = the contract and the specifications were already laid out. So, you do have a mixture on one original theatre organ and cannot say, "They never did it = that way!"   As a last note on pipe planting. Wurlitzer themselves planned pipe/chest placement to put the more quiet pipes nearer the shutters. As you go back = on the chest away from the shutters the ranks get louder. It was Wurltizers = way of doing some terracing without having to come in to tonal finish their quicky installations. It works and if you install a chest where the = larger pipes or louder pipes are in front of the shutters you will not hear much from the rear. I know of several new Wurlitzer organ conglomerations = (large instruments built from smaller ones) that can never be decently terraced because pipe placement was out of order and terracing suffers. The worst = is the Oakland Paramount. Three ranks in the Solo dominate the whole organ. =   When they are being used the rest of the instrument just disappears. Most = of the time you won't even know the organ has a Main Chamber. If you look = where I sit, you can see about 20 organ technicians in a group. We have found the one spot in the whole 3000+ seat auditorium where the organ is balanced. = It is a circle some 15 radius on the auditorium floor! Hilariously we look around to see where many of the local organ people sit to tell us how bad = of a tin ear they really have. ;-)   As for comparisons of classic instruments with mixtures to romantic styled =   Wurlitzers, it is like comparing apples to oranges. Don't compare, just enjoy the uniqueness of both and remember there are bad examples of each = as well as good ones.   Al Sefl  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 14:31:43 -0700   At 05:13 PM 4/5/01 EDT, TheGluePot@aol.com wrote: >The worst is >the Oakland Paramount. Three ranks in the Solo dominate the whole organ. = >When they are being used the rest of the instrument just disappears. = Most of >the time you won't even know the organ has a Main Chamber.     Well said, Al, and VERY true about the Oakland Paramount! I recall a concert by the late Gaylord Carter during which the main chamber relay power supply blew a fuse thereby rendering the main completely silent. = Mr. Carter didn't even know it at the time. His only comment when told was, = "I THOUGHT the main sounded a little weak..."     Regards, Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA NAWCC 140818 http://www.jps.net/rrloesch alternate mailto:cuckoobob@eudoramail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: <HALTGG@aol.com> Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2001 18:01:00 EDT     --part1_50.13d4bd9f.27fe451c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   TO: F. R. Burt: I must confess I don't know what "mixtures" means. The original installation was in the basement of an old english tudor. The = organ spoke up through a 5'X9' concrete tone chute past the first level and the sound emitted out of the opening about 10' from the main floor. The = blueprint places the main chest directly in front. 61 flutes 1st / 61 salicionals = 2nd / 56 open diapason 3rd / 61 oboes 4 th. Behind that the second chest has 61 vox humana 5th and 61 voix celeste = last. These are the smaller pipes. The next largest pipes are to the immediate sides and rear. The large bass pipes are to the rear of the intermediate = side chests. The chimes are in the rear. The area I am designating to the = chamber does not allow for this layout unless pipes can be set up horizontally? = The roof of the attic slopes from 8' high to 4' high in 8'. If the pipes can = be mounted in this manner how do would you keep the mouth of the pipe secure = to the chest without loosing wind pressure? Hal   --part1_50.13d4bd9f.27fe451c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>TO: F. R. Burt: I must = confess I don't know what "mixtures" means. The <BR>original installation was in the basement of an old english tudor. The = organ <BR>spoke up through a 5'X9' concrete tone chute past the first level and = the <BR>sound emitted out of the opening about 10' from the main floor. The = blueprint <BR>places the main chest directly in front. 61 flutes 1st / 61 = salicionals 2nd / <BR>56 open diapason 3rd / 61 oboes 4 th. <BR>Behind that the second chest has 61 vox humana 5th and 61 voix celeste = last. <BR>These are the smaller pipes. The next largest pipes are to the = immediate <BR>sides and rear. The large bass pipes are to the rear of the = intermediate side <BR>chests. The chimes are in the rear. The area I am designating to the = chamber <BR>does not allow for this layout unless pipes can be set up = horizontally? The <BR>roof of the attic slopes from 8' high to 4' high in 8'. If the pipes = can be <BR>mounted in this manner how do would you keep the mouth of the pipe = secure to <BR>the chest without loosing wind pressure? Hal </FONT></HTML>   --part1_50.13d4bd9f.27fe451c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 17:58:25 -0500   <html><DIV> <P><BR>There is a picture of how pipes are done when they have to be lain = on their sides on my website.&nbsp; The URL is <A = href=3D"http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org/members/kleineweber/">www.diyapas= on.pipechat.org/members/kleineweber/</A></P> <P>To keep the wind from flowing outside of the toe of the pipe you simply = put a bead of silicone sealant around the toe of the pipe where it meets = the chest.&nbsp; </P> <P>I mixture is a set of several ranks of pipes that are considered = harmonic corroborating stops.&nbsp; Each rank of pipes will play at a = pitch that corresponds to one of the harmonics of the fundamental, usually = a unison or fifth from the fundamental but sometimes a tierce or = septieme.&nbsp; The designation 12-15-19-22-26, etc. refers to which = harmonic partial the ranks&nbsp;are playing at in relation to the = fundamental.&nbsp; The "12" for example is 12 scale notes from the = fundamental, or an octave and a fifth.&nbsp; The 15 is two octaves, the 19 = is two octaves and a fifth,&nbsp;22 is three octaves and so on.&nbsp; Some = mixtures are simply called mixture, but there are other names that refer = to harmonic corroborating stops such as zimbel, cymbale, cornet, = fourniture, dulcian cornet, etc.</P> <P>Hope this helps.</P></DIV>&gt; <DIV></DIV>&gt;TO: F. R. Burt: I must confess I don't know what "mixtures" = means. The <DIV></DIV>&gt;original installation was in the basement of an old english = tudor. The organ <DIV></DIV>&gt;spoke up through a 5'X9' concrete tone chute past the first = level and the <DIV></DIV>&gt;sound emitted out of the opening about 10' from the main = floor. The blueprint <DIV></DIV>&gt;places the main chest directly in front. 61 flutes 1st / 61 = salicionals 2nd / <DIV></DIV>&gt;56 open diapason 3rd / 61 oboes 4 th. <DIV></DIV>&gt;Behind that the second chest has 61 vox humana 5th and 61 = voix celeste last. <DIV></DIV>&gt;These are the smaller pipes. The next largest pipes are to = the immediate <DIV></DIV>&gt;sides and rear. The large bass pipes are to the rear of the = intermediate side <DIV></DIV>&gt;chests. The chimes are in the rear. The area I am = designating to the chamber <DIV></DIV>&gt;does not allow for this layout unless pipes can be set up = horizontally? The <DIV></DIV>&gt;roof of the attic slopes from 8' high to 4' high in 8'. If = the pipes can be <DIV></DIV>&gt;mounted in this manner how do would you keep the mouth of = the pipe secure to <DIV></DIV>&gt;the chest without loosing wind pressure? Hal <DIV></DIV><br clear=3Dall><hr>Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at = <a = href=3D"http://explorer.msn.com">http://explorer.msn.com</a><br></p></html>=    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlizer Residence Organs From: "Bart Kleineweber" <prinzipal8@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2001 18:11:02 -0500   <html><DIV></DIV> <DIV></DIV> <P>That's exactly the type of roof I have in my attic installation.&nbsp; = Place the bass offsets in the center of the room longitudinally (so that = the pipes are running the same direction as the strip of ceiling that is = 8', with the bass pipes laying on their side.&nbsp; Four foot ranks can go = along side those (standing up) and at the edge of the room where the = ceiling is the lowest put the stopped flutes and reeds, they're usually = the shortest.&nbsp; As for the trebles, if the swell shades are going to = be at right angles to this ceiling set up then place the chest so that all = the trebles are all towards the swell shades.&nbsp; If the swell shades = have to be parrallel to the chests, that is when the loud ranks will be at = the back and the softer ranks in front.</P> <P>Again there is a picture of an identical installation at my website = at:&nbsp; <A = href=3D"http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org/webpages/kleineweber">www.diyapas= on.pipechat.org/webpages/kleineweber</A></P> <P>Bart Kleineweber</P> <P>Chicago, IL</P> <P>&gt;Bum Czech? I know a lot of people looking to avoid you. </P> <DIV></DIV>&gt;Thanks for the input. I had the console refinished before I = stored the organ. <DIV></DIV>&gt;It looked like the original finish had turned green. The = finished product was <DIV></DIV>&gt;amazing. It is quartered walnut and quite a handsome piece = of furniture. The <DIV></DIV>&gt;pipes are mitered to 8' and the flutes are nice enough to = display. My hope is <DIV></DIV>&gt;to be able to fit everything in the attic area of this old = stone house I <DIV></DIV>&gt;have. The roof line is + 8' in the center but the pitch = (it's a mansard roof) <DIV></DIV>&gt;drops off to 4' at 12' wide. The original print layout and = the boards the <DIV></DIV>&gt;chests bolted to are going to have to be modified. I know = very little about <DIV></DIV>&gt;organs. I collect antique automatic/player instruments. = Common sense tells me <DIV></DIV>&gt;the placement of the chests should be; smaller pipes placed = closer to the <DIV></DIV>&gt;swell shades than the larger stuff. I am hoping I don't = have to raise the <DIV></DIV>&gt;roof line. Time will tell. Thanks again. Hal <DIV></DIV><br clear=3Dall><hr>Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at = <a = href=3D"http://explorer.msn.com">http://explorer.msn.com</a><br></p></html>=