DIYAPASON-L Digest #473 - Wednesday, December 26, 2001
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  Springs and Weights
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Springs and Weights
  by "Mac Hayes" <mach37@mindspring.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Springs and Weights
  by "Ron Rarick" <ronrarick@mindspring.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Springs and Weights
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Springs and Weights
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Springs and Weights From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Wed, 26 Dec 2001 10:32:13 -0800   For those of us who are of the 'theatre-organ' persuasion, adding a goodly measure of weight to a sprung regulator is the proper and accepted way to add a good 'bounce' to one's Tibia. When one uses the tremulant, adding just a little too much weight causes the regulator top to bounce and fall just a little too much, which allows the pressure to rise just slightly higher than it would otherwise. This is one of the secrets of a good TO Tibia sound. I know that this doesn't suit most of us, but some of us = like it... ;-)   At 08:47 PM 12/25/01 -0500, Ron Rarick wrote: >I may have missed it, but I don't remember anyone >mentioning a major advantage of using weights as >well as springs: the wind pressure can be far more >easily fine-tuned. Springs are pretty crude in this >regard, but if you want to "bump" the wind pressure >up or down just a smidgen (forgive the highly technical >organ building jargon) there's nothing easier than tossing >on another brick or removing the two1928 hymnals that >somebody put on the reservoir in 1961. Sometimes >this sort of common-sense practicality in the field comes >first and the theories follow later. > >Ron Rarick >Muncie Indiana > >> DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >> Residence Pipe Organs. >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >> > > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > >   Regards, Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA http://home.jps.net/~rrloesch/index.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Springs and Weights From: "Mac Hayes" <mach37@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 26 Dec 2001 11:31:06 -0800   Ron Rarick wrote: > ... nothing easier than tossing on another brick or removing > the two 1928 hymnals that somebody put on the reservoir in 1961.     Yes; I was really surprised to hear what a difference just a single modern hymnbook could make when fine-tuning the weight on a reservoir. Does this mean the books were lighter in 1928? Of course the adjustment was made by a highly experienced and sensitive individual.       Mac Hayes  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Springs and Weights From: "Ron Rarick" <ronrarick@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 26 Dec 2001 17:52:54 -0500   Mike (et al),   Yes, I did read the message from Tim. It inspired my email precisely because he did NOT make the point I made: that weights provide an easier means of pressure re-regulation. This is not to disagree with Tim's message at all - the effect of inertia in the reservoir's response is an important element of the picture. He is quite right. But I would argue that for the practical organ-man in the field, as Tim is and as I once was, the dimension of providing ready adjustment to a working system in real time is also plently of reason for supplementing springs with weights. And I still don't see where/if someone made this point previously in this thread.   Cheers,   Ron Rarick   ----- Original Message ----- From: Mike Gettelman <mike3247@earthlink.net> To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, December 25, 2001 9:20 PM Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Springs and Weights     > Ron Rarick wrote: > > > I may have missed it, but I don't remember anyone > > Merry Christmas Ron, > Wow, not only did you miss It,    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Springs and Weights From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Wed, 26 Dec 2001 18:58:19 EST     In a message dated 12/26/01 1:31:50 PM, mach37@mindspring.com writes:   >Yes; I was really surprised to hear what a difference just a single >modern hymnbook could make when fine-tuning the weight on a reservoir. > >Does this mean the books were lighter in 1928? Of course the adjustment >was made by a highly experienced and sensitive individual. >     One of my reservoirs had a large chunk of steel on top, a slice from a = solid steel rod about 5 inches in diameter and about 6" long, my guess is trying = to get maximum air to compensate for all the leaks...   Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Springs and Weights From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 26 Dec 2001 20:29:09 -0500   Hi Ron, With great respect, I defer to any experienced organ man, for I am but an eager student with very rudimentary knowledge of winding systems at this point. I simply missed the detail of your post, and jumped to the conclusion you had not read Tim's, when in fact you were addressing a completely different aspect of the weights and springs subject. Ease of wind pressure adjustability by adding and subtracting weights would certainly be a prime consideration to a busy organ tech, but I would have thought such would be more appropriately done at the curtain valve.   What struck me about Tim's post was the concept of designing the regulator with both springs and weights in the appropriate amounts to take advantage of the inertia effect to "liven" the instrument's intonation. I'm afraid my personal educational emphasis leans more towards voicing and tonal issues, so I tend to lose track of the more practical reasons for organ design features. Learning the difference between "sterile" wind and "live" wind was far more exciting to me I'm afraid, than how quickly an organ tech can tweak the wind pressure.   Cheers Mike   Ron Rarick wrote:   > Mike (et al), > > Yes, I did read the message from Tim. > It inspired my email precisely because > he did NOT make the point I made: > that weights provide an easier means > of pressure re-regulation. This is not to > disagree with Tim's message at all - the > effect of inertia in the reservoir's response > is an important element of the picture. > He is quite right. But I would argue that > for the practical organ-man in the field, > as Tim is and as I once was, the dimension > of providing ready adjustment to a working > system in real time is also plently of reason > for supplementing springs with weights. > And I still don't see where/if someone made > this point previously in this thread. > > Cheers, > > Ron Rarick >