DIYAPASON-L Digest #356 - Saturday, July 28, 2001
 
Re: Buzzy Diapasons
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Buzzy Diapasons
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Buzzy Diapasons
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
List of used pipework available.
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  List of used pipework available.
  by "Leah Smith" <gregsmithandleah@earthlink.net>
Re: Tim Bovard's Eyes/was Buzzy Diapasons
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
small blower
  by "Olliff Weldon" <oweldon2@mindspring.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  small blower
  by <AVanDruff@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  small blower
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Buzzy Diapasons From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 06:18:45 EDT   << Hello friends, > I know this gets into that touchy subject of voicing. But I have=20 > quite a few Diapason ranks that all have 1/4 cutups and mild nicking.=20 > On at least a couple of the ranks, around the 1' pitch, there are=20 > maybe 4 pipes or so that sound "harsh" or what I would call "buzzy or=20 > strained" sounding. I have tried to make some minor adjustments to=20 > these pipes moving the upper and lower lips with little success. I=20 > have compared them to their normal sounding neighbors but can't find=20 > an obvious physical difference. The things I'm wondering about is=20 > languid height, and how sharp or dull the upper lip should be. As it=20 > stands, some pipes vary in timbre, some with more upper harmonics,=20 > some more dull sounding right next to each other. This is obviously a=20 > "voicing" thing, but does anyone have any simple steps to try? I have=20 > a few pipe tools from OSI and eventually would like to get some=20 > voicing videos, as I really want to learn more about the art. > Thanks, > Eric Sagmuller >>   Dear Eric:   While it is almost impossible to diagnose a flue pipe speech problem via=20 email I will offer some voicing commentary. (Voicing is the art of using th= e=20 ear to hear what a pipe is telling you to do to it.)   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   1) Metal flues often sag a bit with time. The area around the mouth deform= s=20 a bit with gravity pulling the pipe forward where the mouth area is=20 unsupported. The upper lip then bows outward a tiny bit. If the upper lip=20 is not directly over the windway (slit) then the second and fifth harmonics=20 jump up to make the pipe sound fuzzy.   2) Correctly positioning the upper lip directly above the windway gives the= =20 purest tone (maximum fundamental).   3) The position of the windsheet is a function of how high or low the=20 languid is in relation to the lower lip. On some pipes the languid gets=20 pushed up by the quick application of wind from the chest and this is usuall= y=20 found in the strings. Other pipes have the languid sag from weight over the= =20 years. A windsheet out of position is said to be too quick or too slow. To= o=20 quick means the windsheet has moved into the pipe too much and too slow mean= s=20 the windsheet is out too far. A quick pipe will speak a harmonic (chiff, fl= y=20 off, and starting transients problems) and a slow pipe will take time for th= e=20 pipe to come up to full power while being a little dull.   4) Some pipes sitting on a windchest for sometime have their toes close a=20 bit. The pipe will be starved for air and have a loss of power and=20 distinctness of timbre. The modern pipe is regulated for power by opening o= r=20 closing the toe. The 8' C may say 6" WP on the pipe but with the toe closed= =20 down the pressure in the pipe foot may need be only half of that for the pip= e=20 to speak properly. The cutup is set according to the chest wind pressure th= e=20 pipe is to be voiced on. If the toe is too open or too closed it may not=20 match the range of pressure even if the chest pressure is correctly set spot= =20 on. Sometimes it is interesting to put a hypodermic needle down the windway= =20 of a pipe to see what it really is operating on. I have seen pipes on 10" o= f=20 chest wind working just fine with a pipe foot internal pressure of 4".   5) Pipes that are voiced on low pressure are usually done "open toe" so tha= t=20 the full chest pressure is available at the windway. The depth of the=20 windway is adjusted to give the correct amount of wind escaping. Small=20 variations in this adjustment can lead to large changes in pipe speech.   6) AND, here is the weird one: Sometimes a toe hole will whistle just like= =20 a child's rubber squeeze toy (bathtub yellow squeaky duck). The turbulence=20 of the toe hole oscillation will get into the speech of the pipe and make it= =20 sound buzzy. The cure is to change the toe hole opening without altering th= e=20 toe hole area (ream and cone).   7) Because a pipe has so many variables it is not a good idea to move lips,= =20 languids, ears, bridges, or toes until you have some training. You can=20 easily multiply your problems where you started out with just one.   8) The bevel of the languid is fixed at the time of manufacture. Assume it= =20 was correct then, and unless someone has altered it, it should be fine now.=20= =20 The most common angle is 58=BA which allows the windsheet to remain cohesive= .. =20 Other angles are used to create turbulence for chiff effects or to delaminat= e=20 the windsheet to soften the power of the stop but these make voicing much=20 more of a chore.   9) Likewise the sharpness of the upper lip is set at manufacturing. A dull= =20 lip is more a generator of fundamental tone while a sharp upper lip is neede= d=20 for harmonics. It is not an uncommon practice to take the leather off of a=20 dull rank of old Diapasons and cut a new sharp upper lip to give the pipe=20 some harmonics.   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   I have not seen the voicing video offered by the American Association of=20 Organ Builders (may have name wrong) but I remember that the person doing th= e=20 tape was highly qualified. Just remember that watching "This Old House" doe= s=20 not make you a carpenter. When voicing pipes you have to let your ear tell=20 you what is going on with the pipe. That is why you hear voicers using rapi= d=20 taps on a key to hear how a pipe responds then making an adjustment then=20 doing the taps again to be sure the adjustment was correct. This is to chec= k=20 for windsheet placement (quick vs. slow). Then when all of the pipes in a=20 rank are speaking the voicer goes up and down to listen for loud or soft=20 pipes and do the regulation of the toes. Each step is really about the ear=20 and ear training is central to voicing. I do believe the tape is most likel= y=20 about voicing unvoiced pipework (doing the cutup, etc.) and not diagnosing=20 problems in older pipework from age and misuse.   Hope my late night ramblings have shed some light on the subject and that I=20 am making sense at this late hour,   Al Sefl   PS: The two most useful tools (after the human ear) for voicing flue pipes=20 is the hand/finger and the rubber tube. Using a finger like a harmonic=20 bridge will draw out a windsheet and with a rubber tube you can use your lun= g=20 power to push the windsheet in to gauge if it is in the correct position. =20 Adjusting something that is invisible can be maddening. ;-)  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Buzzy Diapasons From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 12:21:04 EDT     In a message dated 7/28/01 5:19:56 AM, TheGluePot@aol.com writes:   ><< Hello friends, > >> I know this gets into that touchy subject of voicing. But I have >> these pipes moving the upper and lower lips with little success. I >> have compared them to their normal sounding neighbors but can't find >> an obvious physical difference. The things I'm wondering about is     >9) Likewise the sharpness of the upper lip is set at manufacturing. A >dull >lip is more a generator of fundamental tone while a sharp upper lip is >needed for harmonics. It is not an uncommon practice to take the = leather off >of a dull rank of old Diapasons and cut a new sharp upper lip to give = the pipe >some harmonics.   There's where novices need help, it is impossible to describe = "fundamentals" and "Harmonics" of pipe speech via email! I myself am hearing impared to begin with and have tinitus, so it's even = more difficult to comprehend subtle things like differences between all this. I think to the novice about the only difference we can decipher between = two pipes of the same note but SIMILAR ranks or just different scales is just a volume difference and maybe some other slight difference that's difficult to define. I sat in on a try-out of 2 similar pipes in the voicing shop, I think one = was an octave and the other a prin., the same note and they were trying to see =   which they liked better. There was a slight difference between the two, couldn't figure what it was other than one was slightly louder.       >I have not seen the voicing video offered by the American Association of >Organ Builders (may have name wrong) but I remember that the person doing >the tape was highly qualified. Just remember that watching "This Old = House" >does not make you a carpenter.   I have to agree, and I once mentioned this tape to our voicer with the = same reaction, the tape is nice to look at to get some ideas and concepts but = you really can't learn the fine art of voicing by watching a video tape and listening to it being done over TV speakers! When I am ready on my organ, I will be privately hiring my co-worker = voicer to go over my pipes and deal with all the regulating, voicing, repairs to =   some spotted metal pipes that need soldering type work, the reed and = tuning.   Towards that end I did what I was able to first, I cleaned the pipes, removed cosmetic dents, dings, unbent a few ears, removed the old slides, will install aluminum slides, soldered a few zinc pipes where an ear came =   off or there was a seam crack from removing dents etc, and will get wind = to the chests. I would not even attempt to solder spotted metal pipes or work = on reeds, video or not!   So initially I am leaving all the voicing, regulating and tuning to the expert since the pipework has been moved around a lot, damage here and = there, a few pipes replaced by pipes from other organs, and of course the installation in a totally new environment than the Methodist church it = came from will no doubt require some additional alteration.   Eventually, for practical and financials I will have to learn how to tune = my own organ which he said he would teach me how to do, I am sure I'll be = aided a lot by the Peterson tuner and would eventually buy one.   I would expect it to take a good 10 working days to voice, regulate and = tune, so it won't come cheap but once done it's done except periodic tuning of course.     You know, I didn't mention this before, but I have a lot of used pipes = left over from the Reuter and the Kilgen organs I salvaged for parts, both = organs had considerable pipework removed for keepsakes or an art display, so = nearly all of the ranks were rendered totally useless. I have a nice Kilgen Doppelflute I WANT to use eventually and would have = to make new replacement pipes since it is missing 17 pipes, I will also use = the Kilgen Vox Humana which was missing 2 pipes but I can replace those. I used the 16 manual bourdon form Kilgen and the Aeoline I will use too, = it is complete by happenstance! The #1 scale -1 Bourdon I also used ,it was missing the top 3 pipes, I managed to replace 2 of them so far with = rescaled melodias from the same organ that were nearly identical in every way.   I sold the Reuter 16' Lieblich Ged to a co-worker who is going to donate = it to a local church to add it to their Dobson organ on the Great :) So all the rest of the ranks are incomplete and of no use to me, and I'd = like to get this stuff out of my basement. I put an ad on the Church organ trading board and put a few pipes up on = ebay.   I will include a list of what I have in a second post, but I was thinking = for Eric's problem with his voicing, that obtaining a few used pipes to experiment with might be a good way to play around with cut ups, windways = and so forth and not have to practice or learn on GOOD pipes you need! I will say now that I will not ship the bottom octaves of any, too much trouble and all on my part to obtain lumber and plywood and build crates = to ship via truck. I can however ship pipes from about 4' C up via UPS.       Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Buzzy Diapasons From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 11:23:32 -0500   At 06:18 AM 7/28/01 -0400, Al Sefl wrote: > >While it is almost impossible to diagnose a flue pipe speech problem via >email I will offer some voicing commentary. (Voicing is the art of using = the >ear to hear what a pipe is telling you to do to it.) >   <snipping lots of very accurate info>   Greetings Eric, and List!   The only thing I'd care to add to Al's commentary is one *more* item for his "most-useful-tools" list. That tool being your EYES.   Especially when one is working with 'experienced' pipework, (trying to figger out why one or two of a rank don't sound like the rest of them...) the first thing I'd do is to visually examine the 'offending pipe' as compared to its closest neighbors which play correctly.   If one looks carefully, from numerous different perspectives (straight = into the mouth..., down the front of the pipe towards the mouth..., up thru the toehole and windway..., down the inside of the front of the pipe..., etc) you will very likely notice *something* about the offending pipe which doesn't quite match its (happy) neighbors. Look particularly at the relationships of the upper/lower lips and languid to each other and themselves. In most cases, these parts should all tend to be straight and lined up with each other -- finding any parameter of the 'off' pipe that doesn't look the same as its neighbors will give a huge clue where to = start "adjusting". Look also at the toeholes, the tuning scrolls/slides, and soldered seams of the pipe. All should be comparable to their neighbors = in size, position, and condition.   Simple example:   3 ficticious Wicks capped metal bourdon pipes from the '60s. Low D# is unstable and wants to overblow instead of playing its fundamental, while D and E play fine (or at least as fine as those things ever did...<wink>) Examining the 3 pipes, you see that there are no physical defects, and = that the caps are comparably sealed and stable. All 3 toeholes are of = comparable size. Looking straight on into the mouths of all 3 pipes, you notice that the languid of D# is slightly lower in the middle of the mouth than it is at the ends -- and that D and E are more nearly even all the way across = the width of their mouths. AHA, you say -- this could be a clue! <g> AND SO, you get your trusty languid rod, gently tap the center of the D# back up = so it looks more even (like its neighbors), put them back on the chest, and = D# is suddenly FIXED!!   Of course, as Al says, the art of voicing pipes is indeed much more = complex of an art to be able to explain sufficiently via email, watching videos, reading books, or etc. If you *do* utilize these means, however, you'll = be better prepared to know "what to look/listen for" when you *are* actually confronted with the task of trying to fix any odd "off" pipe.   Also as Al says..., I hope this all makes a little sense...!   Cheers!   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR            
(back) Subject: List of used pipework available. From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 12:57:15 EDT     Now that I am getting to sorting out what Iam going to use/keep and what I = am going to want to find new homes for, I have a number of wood and metal = pipes I am going to sell off. Most are from incomplete ranks from the Kilgen = organ that the church kept back pipes from for an art display.   If anyone is in need of an odd pipe or two for replacements etc. let me = know. Offhand I can think of; Gamba, Salicional, Stopped wood flute, Melodia Open diapason 43 scale, Vio diapason.   I also have two Reuter manuals and a pedalboard.   The larger metal pipes (over about 4' long ) I have not decided what to = do with, they are too expensive to crate and ship anywhere, and again are = part of incomplete ranks, so they are nearly useless to my project . Some may be sold already, haven't updated this recently.   Kilgen organ, 1927 Opus 3971   8' St Diapason   C1, F6 thru B12,   (Stopped wood, marked "Flute")   C#14, D15, E17, F18, A#23, C25, C#26, D27, E29, F30, F#31, G#33 thru C49   Metal inscribed; "fl d'amore"; C#50 through C73 (tentatively SOLD) =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     43 scale 8' open diapason;   Should have 1-37, I have; = 39,52,44,46,48,50,52,54,56,58,60,62,64,66,68,70,72   An upper octave of metal flue pipes, unmarked, C#62-C73, Sorry; SOLD along with 46, 60 & 61 from above.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   8' Melodia;   C13 , C#14, D#16, F18, G20, A22, B24, C#26, D#28, F30, G32, A34, B36, C#38, D#40, F42, G44 G#45, A46, A#47, B48, C49 through C73 with the top octave being metal     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   Gamba and Celeste, odds and ends, inquire.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   Dulciana, Kilgen 4' C13 on up, spotted metal   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D       FROM REUTER OPUS 454;       Dulciana, 56 scale 4' C13 through G44 (G#45 missing) A46 through B60     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   Salicional 60 scale,   4' C13, C#14, D15 missing, D# 16, E 17 missing, F 18 through C25 C#26 and =   D27 missing, D#28 through G44, G#45 missing, A46 through F#55, G56 = missing, G#57 through C73   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Vio Cel, 60 scale   4' C13 through C73, missing C49     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     8' Open Diapason 42 Scale   C1-19 should have, G20 through B72 lead, linen surface out     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   Melodia C1 through F#7   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   8' Oboe Not inventoried yet, but I know some of the smaller reed pipes are = missing.   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   8' Oboe horn Not inventoried yet, and I know some of the flues are missing, maybe a few = of the smaller reeds as well. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D     OTHER PARTS;   2 Reuter Manuals from opus 454 $50 each   Reuter nameboard with the stop tabs and mechanical stop action assembly   Kilgen Great, mechanical Swell and Pedal relay boxes with the magnets, pneumatics and all that nice complex stuff inside, quite heavy, Inquire.       Price on pipes includes basic cleaning and undenting cosmetic dents, straightening metal pipes, and oiling wood pipes, every effort was made to =   accurately describe what I have and what is missing, if you are interested = in specific pipes let me know and I will re-confirm the existance of those = pipes and their condition.   Some pipes may have further damage needing soldering etc, all will need tuning slides, price does not include shipping, but all of these pipes = from 4' C up can go via UPS.   I will charge a flat $10 for packing and boxing up, plus the actual UPS charge.     If you are interested in a particular rank or pipes let me know and I can assess if any repairs are necessary to any of those specific pipes and let =   you know ahead of time.     The bottom octaves (8' C-1 through B12) of the priced ranks are not inventoried or included since these would require considerable labor on my =   part to crate, pack and would have to go via truck. If interested in any = of these on a pick up here in NW Iowa basis let me know.   All the pipes were originally on 5" wind.         Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] List of used pipework available. From: "Leah Smith" <gregsmithandleah@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 10:24:14 -0700   Hello....I am interested in the oboe or oboe horn ranks. What is your = asking price? I am located in Claremont, CA, just outside Los Angeles. If = possible, could you please include the costs of shipping and such when you get a = chance. Where are you located at?? I appreciate any info regarding these ranks. = Thanks a lot. Greg Smith   Mpmollerorgan@aol.com wrote:   > Now that I am getting to sorting out what Iam going to use/keep and what = I am > going to want to find new homes for, I have a number of wood and metal = pipes > I am going to sell off. Most are from incomplete ranks from the Kilgen = organ > that the church kept back pipes from for an art display. > > If anyone is in need of an odd pipe or two for replacements etc. let me = know. > Offhand I can think of; Gamba, Salicional, Stopped wood flute, Melodia > Open diapason 43 scale, Vio diapason. > > I also have two Reuter manuals and a pedalboard. > > The larger metal pipes (over about 4' long ) I have not decided what to = do > with, they are too expensive to crate and ship anywhere, and again are = part > of incomplete ranks, so they are nearly useless to my project . > Some may be sold already, haven't updated this recently. > > Kilgen organ, 1927 Opus 3971 > > 8' St Diapason > > C1, F6 thru B12, > > (Stopped wood, marked "Flute") > > C#14, D15, E17, F18, A#23, C25, C#26, D27, E29, F30, F#31, G#33 thru C49 > > Metal inscribed; "fl d'amore"; > C#50 through C73 (tentatively SOLD) > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > 43 scale 8' open diapason; > > Should have 1-37, I have; = 39,52,44,46,48,50,52,54,56,58,60,62,64,66,68,70,72 > > An upper octave of metal flue pipes, unmarked, C#62-C73, > Sorry; SOLD along with 46, 60 & 61 from above. > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > 8' Melodia; > > C13 , C#14, D#16, F18, G20, A22, B24, C#26, D#28, F30, G32, A34, B36, > C#38, D#40, F42, G44 G#45, A46, A#47, B48, C49 through C73 with the top > octave being metal > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > Gamba and Celeste, odds and ends, inquire. > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > Dulciana, Kilgen > 4' C13 on up, spotted metal > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > FROM REUTER OPUS 454; > > Dulciana, 56 scale > 4' C13 through G44 (G#45 missing) A46 through B60 > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > Salicional 60 scale, > > 4' C13, C#14, D15 missing, D# 16, E 17 missing, F 18 through C25 C#26 = and > D27 missing, D#28 through G44, G#45 missing, A46 through F#55, G56 = missing, > G#57 through C73 > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > Vio Cel, 60 scale > > 4' C13 through C73, missing C49 > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > 8' Open Diapason 42 Scale > > C1-19 should have, G20 through B72 lead, linen surface out > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > Melodia > C1 through F#7 > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > 8' Oboe > Not inventoried yet, but I know some of the smaller reed pipes are = missing. > > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > 8' Oboe horn > Not inventoried yet, and I know some of the flues are missing, maybe a = few of > the smaller reeds as well. > =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D > > OTHER PARTS; > > 2 Reuter Manuals from opus 454 $50 each > > Reuter nameboard with the stop tabs and mechanical stop action assembly > > Kilgen Great, mechanical Swell and Pedal relay boxes with the magnets, > pneumatics and all that nice complex stuff inside, quite heavy, Inquire. > > Price on pipes includes basic cleaning and undenting cosmetic dents, > straightening metal pipes, and oiling wood pipes, every effort was made = to > accurately describe what I have and what is missing, if you are = interested in > specific pipes let me know and I will re-confirm the existance of those = pipes > and their condition. > > Some pipes may have further damage needing soldering etc, all will need > tuning slides, price does not include shipping, but all of these pipes = from > 4' C up can go via UPS. > > I will charge a flat $10 for packing and boxing up, plus the actual UPS > charge. > > If you are interested in a particular rank or pipes let me know and I = can > assess if any repairs are necessary to any of those specific pipes and = let > you know ahead of time. > > The bottom octaves (8' C-1 through B12) of the priced ranks are not > inventoried or included since these would require considerable labor on = my > part to crate, pack and would have to go via truck. If interested in any = of > these on a pick up here in NW Iowa basis let me know. > > All the pipes were originally on 5" wind. > > Randall > http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/ > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Tim Bovard's Eyes/was Buzzy Diapasons From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 15:48:04 EDT   Good point Tim. When dealing with old pipes your eyes are one of the = first clues to problems. Seeing the dead bat, moth, plaster dust, etc., sitting = in the bottom of the reed pipe surely is a visual clue to the pipes problem. = On the "off" flues it only takes a piece of sawdust in the windways to have = made them "off". Hold the pipe up and look through the toe toward the windway with a light source in the background. On most pipework you can SEE if = the windway is clean and clear. That's a good start. Thanks Tim.   Best wishes to everyone,   Al Sefl  
(back) Subject: small blower From: "Olliff Weldon" <oweldon2@mindspring.com> Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2001 23:44:48 -0400   Hello,   I have been enjoying reading the list for the past few months. This is my first posting.   I am in the process of collecting parts to build a home pipe organ. It all started when I won the bid on a rank of Aeoline posted on E-bay by a member of this list. It hasn't gotten out of hand yet, but the parts are up to a 2/11 so far. I have the added challenge of learning how to play once the organ is built. This will be a long term project.   The main reason for posting is that I have found a source for 1/15 hp. blowers, sp of 2.5" for $20 that might be useful for small jobs. If there is interest I can post details.   Olliff Weldon  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] small blower From: <AVanDruff@aol.com> Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2001 00:10:04 EDT   Where can I get one of those blowers? Thanks, Albert avandruff@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] small blower From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2001 00:22:58 EDT     In a message dated 7/28/01 10:49:20 PM, oweldon2@mindspring.com writes:   > > The main reason for posting is that I have found a source for >1/15 hp. blowers, sp of 2.5" for $20 that might be useful for small >jobs. If there is interest I can post details. > >Olliff Weldon   1/15th HP?? I don't think that would operate more than a pipe or two at best. I think the smallest Laukhuff blower is at least 1/4HP and I borrowed one from work over a weekend to test a 24 note chest, and it barely provided enough wind to wheeze some sound out of single pedal bourdon pipes. The Laukhuff blowers are the best, but the best never comes cheap!   Speaking of blowers, we tried a test of a Laukhuff blower against a new = type made in the USA that had a white fiberglass case and looked more like something you'd make ice cream from than a blower, more so with the two rubber hoses that stuck out of the side for I forget what reason now. = Maybe to vent the motor for cooling it. The Laukhuff not only was quieter but was made and looked better.   The other blower also had a drawback, if it got hot it would shut off and stay off for about 5 mins (maybe in the middle of a hymn...) and due to = the way it was made it seemed prone to getting hot since it was all closed up. =   The price difference was not very much either. Al Sefl can detail about blowers!   I found a rather interesting video on the Laukhuff site, it's 7.5 megs and = no sound but shows the facilities in the factory, workers assembling things, pouring lead sheets etc. Pretty interesting;   http://www.laukhuff.de/movie/video.mov   Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/