DIYAPASON-L Digest #446 - Tuesday, November 27, 2001
 
Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Tubular pneumatic chest conversion
  by "homer valenzona" <dochome@hotmail.com>
Re: [Residence Organs] Progress.
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Telephone Punch Down Blocks
  by "wurlic1" <wurlic1@lara.on.ca>
Progress (OTLTO)
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Progress (OTLTO)
  by "Steven Durham" <sdurham11@home.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Tubular pneumatic chest conversion From: "homer valenzona" <dochome@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2001 14:14:52 +0000   Hi Larry, You described exactly the chest I got. Thanks a lot for the advice. Regarding the voicing, shouldn't this be regarded as a similar situation = to most EP/EM chest situation where the pipe stands immediately on top of the =   valve openning. These Hinners' chests have thick toeboards about 1 1/2 inches and I thought that this is to provide some sort of expansion expansion chamber to dissipate the vortex/turbulence. Homer   ----Original Message Follows---- From: Larry Chace <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Reply-To: "Residence Organ List" <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> To: "Residence Organ List" <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Subject: [Residence Organs] Re: Tubular pneumatic chest conversion Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2001 23:47:47 -0500   "homer valenzona" <dochome@hotmail.com> and John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> discussed a pair of windchests. From Homer's description, it sounded like these are the Hinners "mushroom" (or "toadstool") chests rather than real cone valve chests.   The "mushroom" chests are ventil chests, in which the wind supply to each stop is controlled by a large valve, and each note of which has a round leather pouch with an attached valve that seats against the bottom side of the toeboard. These pouches are formed of individually-turned wooden "bowls" sitting atop a wooden dowel that is bored out and also serves to connect the interior of the pouch with the note-channel that is routed in the bottom board. If you removed the bottom boards, which run front-to-back on the chest, you will also remove the associated = "mushrooms".   These chests were used on most of Hinners' tubular-pneumatic organs (about 200 of them) and probably also on most of their electro-pneumatic organs (another 200 or so); their remaing 2700 or so organs were trackers. A = very few Hinners organs had real cone-valve chests ("Kegellagen"), ventil = chests in which the note valves were opened via inflated pneumatics that were exposed (!) beneath the chests. I've seen exactly one such instrument, an original installation that was barely playable 5 years ago, having been unused for many years.   Back to Homer's chests -- in the early 1960s I worked on a residence organ project, the rebuilding of a 6-rank Hinners t-p into a "neo-baroque" instrument in an organ professor's living room. The two 3-rank chests = were used as-were but with the addition of standard exhaust magnets to operate the chests' primaries. This was perfectly workable since the = specification called for 3 straight stops on each manual. By now, the leather might = well want to be replaced. In that case, you can do it, but be careful that the new pouches have the same amount of "dish" as the originals. Providing = too much "dish" can be disastrous in that the valves can then *fail* to seat properly and the chest will cipher (or at least whimper).   If the organ design calls for unification, then it is possible to remove the "mushrooms" entirely and fit electro-mechanical valves to the bottoms of the toeboards. The usual consideration would want to be given to matters such as the need for expansion chambers, the style of voicing of the pipework, and so on.   Larry Chace       DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own Residence Pipe Organs. HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org       _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Progress. From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2001 11:17:30 EST   During the four days the Hall 16' Bourdons were hooked to wind and the Lieblich action and the floor shakes again! The Lieblich action came from E-Bay with a regulator. The regulator needs releathering.The Lieblich action had been wet so the whole thing was used = for a pattern to build a new one. It works really well, now I have a soft = pedal flute to go with the 16 Gedeckt in the swell. Now If I can just get the Resultant to work a little. Next will be the 16'reed for the pedal. The chest's for the basses are = done but no racking yet. I am not sure what to do for the 8' on up chest work. Then 8'trumpet for the great with the 4'of the 8' pedal principal. This will be a DE chest.   Have fun don't catch a cold (I am fighting this one). Dennis  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Telephone Punch Down Blocks From: "wurlic1" <wurlic1@lara.on.ca> Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2001 15:55:13 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00DF_01C1775B.E6CB58A0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Dear Craig:   I have a Wurlitzer main cable of about 1200 plain white cotton wires, =3D cut in two places, to re-assemble.. What exactly do you mean by =3D "telephone punch down block" ? Does is minimize soldering ? I resume = =3D it facilitates standard telephone cabling, facilitating quick connector = =3D plugs. Thank you.   ~~ wurlic1@lara.on.ca =3D20 ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Elders, Craig=3D20 To: 'Residence Organ List'=3D20 Sent: Monday, November 26, 2001 11:09 AM Subject: [Residence Organs] Telephone Punch Down Blocks     =3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00DF_01C1775B.E6CB58A0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2614.3500" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Dear Craig:</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>I have a Wurlitzer main cable of about 1200 plain = =3D white cotton=3D20 wires, cut in two places, to re-assemble.. What exactly do you mean = by=3D20 "telephone punch down block" ?&nbsp; Does is minimize soldering =3D ?&nbsp;&nbsp; I=3D20 resume it facilitates standard telephone cabling, facilitating quick =3D connector=3D20 plugs.&nbsp; Thank you.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>~~ <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:wurlic1@lara.on.ca">wurlic1@lara.on.ca</A>&nbsp;&nbsp;=3D2= 0 </FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: = =3D 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A href=3D3D"mailto:c.elders@tcu.edu" title=3D3Dc.elders@tcu.edu>Elders, = =3D Craig</A>=3D20 </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org"=3D20 title=3D3DDIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org>'Residence Organ List'</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Monday, November 26, 2001 = =3D 11:09=3D20 AM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> [Residence Organs] =3D Telephone=3D20 Punch Down Blocks</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV> <DIV><FONT color=3D3D#0000ff face=3D3D"Comic Sans MS"><SPAN=3D20 =3D class=3D3D340344815-26112001>&nbsp;</SPAN></FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY>= =3D </HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00DF_01C1775B.E6CB58A0--    
(back) Subject: Progress (OTLTO) From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2001 23:22:56 -0500   (Or The Lack There Of!)   Greetings, all. Craig Elder's recent comments about his project recall = the real advantage to be gained by sharing what is going on (even if it isn't much!).   It was "only" a year ago that I got one rank playing, a Clarabella = (Concert Flute, Melodia, etc.) unified at several pitches and playing from a single manual. Little has really changed since then, but, amazingly enough, the grandkids still enjoy playing it.   I recently helped a little in the (sad) removal of a residence pipe organ that had been built at home by a late local organ service man. In a two-story chamber about 10' square, starting in the basement, he has assembled a 2-manual organ that included a 16' Marr and Colton Tuba (full-length) as well as a 4-rank Echo division (from opus #1527). The offset bass pipes from that chest's Dulciana, Dulciana Celeste, and = Aeoline were never installed and were found up the attic along with perhaps 100 zinc string bass pipes and miscellaneous wooden pipes. I salvaged 3 Aeolian swell shades, nicely made of laminated lumber and fited with ball bearings (original???). I *might* cut them down for use in my instrument.   I also picked up three boxes of miscellaneous treble pipes; after several hours of sorting I find quite a few top octaves of 4' stops, or perhaps more likely notes 62-73 that got removed from the rest of their ranks. At least some of these trebles might prove useful.   The "lesson", if there is one, is to label everything, or perhaps keep a nice inventory list showing what is what. A few of those treble octave were wrapped in 1950 newspapers, but most were just a jumble. The other folks had now idea that the Echo bass pipes were around, since they were not in the chamber.   In October I attended the convention of the American Institute of Organbuilders, up near Boston, and that was great fun. We visited the shops of Anover, Noack, and Fisk and got to see and hear several very interesting instruments. I spoke with someone from Austin and found out that they probably have *in stock* the shallots and other parts needed to complete the bottom octave of a 16' Posaune that I got a year or so ago. (Those pipes were originally in John T. Austin's own residence organ and were later in another residence instrument that was dumpstered by the builder's widow, another sad tale.) Four of those bottom 12 lost their blocks, shallots, etc. to the dumpster. Now, I wonder what it would cost to have Austin make the replacements?!?   The shop has gotten improved a bit, and I hope to have a bit more free = time as of January, when I'll retire from Cornell University (but will still work part-time elsewhere). I just dusted off the little set of 3/4" scale paper cutouts of chests, reservoirs, etc., and have started once again trying to decide how to arrange things in the chamber (and what size = chests to build).   Another interesting thing about the 1-year-old 1-rank organ: I haven't tuned it since last year at this time. It is in a basement chamber, well-insulated, and the temperature has varied somewhat (45-70 degrees). Still, the Estey wooden pipes have stayed very well in tune all this time!   Larry Chace      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Progress (OTLTO) From: "Steven Durham" <sdurham11@home.com> Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2001 20:11:22 -0800   Larry and List:   It is a sad tale when pipe organs and their parts get into the hands of uninformed individuals. Some of the horror stories I've heard about entire organs being thrown in the dumpster make me ill.   A former friend of mine owned the famous Buddy Cole theatre organ and had it in storage at his home for many years. He evidentially didn't care for the Dulciana ranks in this organ because he was using most of pipes from them to walk across a mud puddle! They were literally trampled into the ground.   Steven Durham Portland, OR   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> To: <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2001 8:22 PM Subject: [Residence Organs] Progress (OTLTO)     > (Or The Lack There Of!) > > Greetings, all. Craig Elder's recent comments about his project recall the > real advantage to be gained by sharing what is going on (even if it isn't > much!). > > It was "only" a year ago that I got one rank playing, a Clarabella (Concert > Flute, Melodia, etc.) unified at several pitches and playing from a single > manual. Little has really changed since then, but, amazingly enough, the > grandkids still enjoy playing it. > > I recently helped a little in the (sad) removal of a residence pipe organ > that had been built at home by a late local organ service man. In a > two-story chamber about 10' square, starting in the basement, he has > assembled a 2-manual organ that included a 16' Marr and Colton Tuba > (full-length) as well as a 4-rank Echo division (from opus #1527). The > offset bass pipes from that chest's Dulciana, Dulciana Celeste, and Aeoline > were never installed and were found up the attic along with perhaps 100 > zinc string bass pipes and miscellaneous wooden pipes. I salvaged 3 > Aeolian swell shades, nicely made of laminated lumber and fited with ball > bearings (original???). I *might* cut them down for use in my instrument. > > I also picked up three boxes of miscellaneous treble pipes; after several > hours of sorting I find quite a few top octaves of 4' stops, or perhaps > more likely notes 62-73 that got removed from the rest of their ranks. At > least some of these trebles might prove useful. > > The "lesson", if there is one, is to label everything, or perhaps keep a > nice inventory list showing what is what. A few of those treble octave > were wrapped in 1950 newspapers, but most were just a jumble. The other > folks had now idea that the Echo bass pipes were around, since they were > not in the chamber. > > In October I attended the convention of the American Institute of > Organbuilders, up near Boston, and that was great fun. We visited the > shops of Anover, Noack, and Fisk and got to see and hear several very > interesting instruments. I spoke with someone from Austin and found out > that they probably have *in stock* the shallots and other parts needed to > complete the bottom octave of a 16' Posaune that I got a year or so ago. > (Those pipes were originally in John T. Austin's own residence organ and > were later in another residence instrument that was dumpstered by the > builder's widow, another sad tale.) Four of those bottom 12 lost their > blocks, shallots, etc. to the dumpster. Now, I wonder what it would cost > to have Austin make the replacements?!? > > The shop has gotten improved a bit, and I hope to have a bit more free time > as of January, when I'll retire from Cornell University (but will still > work part-time elsewhere). I just dusted off the little set of 3/4" scale > paper cutouts of chests, reservoirs, etc., and have started once again > trying to decide how to arrange things in the chamber (and what size chests > to build). > > Another interesting thing about the 1-year-old 1-rank organ: I haven't > tuned it since last year at this time. It is in a basement chamber, > well-insulated, and the temperature has varied somewhat (45-70 degrees). > Still, the Estey wooden pipes have stayed very well in tune all this time! > > Larry Chace > > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >