DIYAPASON-L Digest #402 - Monday, October 1, 2001
 
Re: Building Codes and organs
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Home and Organ Complete (Cross Posted)
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Home and Organ Complete (Cross Posted)
  by "Tom Dimock" <tad1@cornell.edu>
Decorative  facade pipes
  by "homer valenzona" <dochome@hotmail.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Decorative  facade pipes
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Decorative  facade pipes
  by "Jimmy" <jrbaird@erols.com>
20's console finish mystery
  by "Brian  Graham" <briangraham@sunflower.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  20's console finish mystery
  by "John Haskey" <johnh@haskey.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  20's console finish mystery
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Building Codes and organs From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2001 09:59:52 EDT     --part1_15c.1d4fc26.28e9d0d8_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 10/1/01 12:40:13 AM Eastern Daylight Time, DEMPAR1 = writes:   > Right now, my permit has been on hold for almost a year because the > neighborhood association has deemed that a pipe organ would be a public > nuisance and they are opposing it. > Hi Group:   This post is somewhat peripheral, but not really, if you can't build a = space in order to have an organ. I am a devotee of alternative, owner built construction methods such as cordwood walls and slipform concrete or clay, =   and it strikes me that such massive construction might be just the ticket = for organ acoustics. The price is right, too, if you can get it past the inspector. Cordwood can be built as fill in for a post and frame construction or as a massive free standing wall. Log Home builders may = have managed to get this included in the Code, I don't know. There are some books, notably by Rob Roy. From what I can determine, if you can deal = with curved walls, the slip form wall of Ken Kern is very cheap to construct = (see his books, esp. the last version of this wall in "Ken Kern's Workshop"). Those of you in the cities may be out of luck, but there is an old book on =   fighting building codes by Mr. Kern, titled, I think, "The Code." In some =   cases "it is easier to obtain forgiveness than permission." I think I = would call my addition a "family room" and bring my pipe organ in under cover of =   darkness. I find it hard to believe that you could be more annoying than = the booming basses of the car stereo crowd out in my neck of the woods. = Another issue to consider if you are relocating is that you are subject to subdivision covenants in developments in addition to zoning. These can = have all sorts of things in them, depending on the whim of the developer and = the age of the development. You can flout them and your neighbors will have = to sue to get you to stop whatever you are doing in violation. You might = also be able to get ordained and build a "chapel," which your zoning might = allow.   Regards, Roy Kersey     --part1_15c.1d4fc26.28e9d0d8_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>In a message dated = 10/1/01 12:40:13 AM Eastern Daylight Time, DEMPAR1 writes: <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Right now, my = permit has been on hold for almost a year because the neighborhood = association has deemed that a pipe organ would be a public nuisance and = they are opposing it. <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Hi Group: <BR> <BR>This post is somewhat peripheral, but not really, if you can't build a = space in order to have an organ. &nbsp;I am a devotee of alternative, = owner built construction methods such as cordwood walls and slipform = concrete or clay, and it strikes me that such massive construction might = be just the ticket for organ acoustics. &nbsp;The price is right, too, if = you can get it past the inspector. &nbsp;Cordwood can be built as fill in = for a post and frame construction or as a massive free standing wall. = &nbsp;Log Home builders may have managed to get this included in the Code, = I don't know. &nbsp;There are some books, notably by Rob Roy. &nbsp;From = what I can determine, if you can deal with curved walls, the slip form = wall of Ken Kern is very cheap to construct (see his books, esp. the last = version of this wall in "Ken Kern's Workshop"). &nbsp;Those of you in the = cities may be out of luck, but there is an old book on fighting building = codes by Mr. Kern, titled, I think, "The Code." &nbsp;I <BR> <BR>Regards, <BR>Roy Kersey <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_15c.1d4fc26.28e9d0d8_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Home and Organ Complete (Cross Posted) From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2001 13:31:20 EDT     In a message dated 9/30/01 9:42:18 PM, DEMPAR1@aol.com writes:   >ing a standard 12x14 room, they get suspicious and called for a public >hearing on the issuance of the permit. Right now, my permit has been on >hold for almost a year because the neighborhood association has deemed >that a pipe organ would be a public nuisance and they are opposing it.   You can cite that local churches ALSO have pipe organs and they don't = disturb the neighborhood.       Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Home and Organ Complete (Cross Posted) From: "Tom Dimock" <tad1@cornell.edu> Date: Mon, 01 Oct 2001 13:55:35 -0400   At 10:41 PM 09/30/2001 EDT, DEMPAR1 wrote: >Right now, my permit has been on hold for almost a year because the >neighborhood association has deemed that a pipe organ would be a public >nuisance and they are opposing it.   I've often wondered how "neighborhood associations" got so much power in "the land of the free". I'm awful glad I live out in rural upstate New York, where concepts like "neighborhood associations" and "zoning" are viewed with profound distrust.... ---------------------------------------------------------------------------= - Tom Dimock ---- Cornell University ---- tad1@cornell.edu "There go my people. I must follow them, for I am their leader." M. = Gandhi  
(back) Subject: Decorative facade pipes From: "homer valenzona" <dochome@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 01 Oct 2001 18:42:50   Hi List, I would like to cut down a broken rank of string pipes for a decorative facade. How can I accomplish this neatly. I've seen tube cutters in the local hardware store which have cutting wheels . I think it works by clamping it around a cylinder and continuously rotating it until the = cutting wheel/blade scores the pipe/ cylinder. I plan to cut smaller pipes (high tin) and larger ones (made of zinc). Thanks in advance for your advice. Homer   _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Decorative facade pipes From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sun, 30 Sep 2001 05:28:36 -0500   HI Homer, Try using a band saw for your project. I have done that before with great success. Have fun. Gary ----- Original Message ----- From: homer valenzona <dochome@hotmail.com> To: <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, October 01, 2001 6:42 PM Subject: [Residence Organs] Decorative facade pipes     > Hi List, > I would like to cut down a broken rank of string pipes for a decorative > facade. How can I accomplish this neatly. I've seen tube cutters in the > local hardware store which have cutting wheels . I think it works by > clamping it around a cylinder and continuously rotating it until the cutting > wheel/blade scores the pipe/ cylinder. I plan to cut smaller pipes (high > tin) and larger ones (made of zinc). Thanks in advance for your advice. > Homer > > _________________________________________________________________ > Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Decorative facade pipes From: "Jimmy" <jrbaird@erols.com> Date: Mon, 01 Oct 2001 20:04:49 -0400   A cut off saw with a fine tooth blade will work also, if you take the cut slowely.   Jimmy Baird  
(back) Subject: 20's console finish mystery From: "Brian Graham" <briangraham@sunflower.com> Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2001 22:28:13 -0000   Hello out there!   I was hoping one of you out there could help me with a wood finish mystery.   I have an Estey console from 1925. It's Oak with a dark finish. I'd like very much to know what sort of products they were using for this type of work in the 20's, since it is my intention to clean, patch the spots where the color is missing, and polish, but not refinish.   In most places, there is virtually no sheen, and there certainly is no build-up of finish anywhere that could be flaked off. The top of the bench is lighter than anywhere else, as though half of the color rubbed off on the earlier owner's pants.   Also, a very light spot on the bench appears to indicate that prolonged exposure to moisture removes the color pretty thoroughly.   A light rubbing with denatured alcohol cleans the surface, slightly more vigorous rubbing begins to remove the color. This leads me to believe that "stain", at least in the modern sense of the word, was not used.   Any ideas?   Thanks!!   -Brian Graham  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] 20's console finish mystery From: "John Haskey" <johnh@haskey.net> Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2001 20:48:33 -0700 (PDT)         On Mon, 1 Oct 2001, Brian Graham wrote:   > Hello out there! > > I was hoping one of you out there could help me > with a wood finish mystery. > > I have an Estey console from 1925. It's Oak with > a dark finish. I'd like very much to know what sort > of products they were using for this type of work > in the 20's, since it is my intention to clean, patch > the spots where the color is missing, and polish, but > not refinish. >   Read this posting to the MMD list:   http://www.foxtail.com/Archives/Digests/200109/2001.09.01.01.html   for one possible example.   ---john.    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] 20's console finish mystery From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sun, 30 Sep 2001 11:50:24 -0500   HI Brian and list. I have a 1922 Hinners console for my home project. I came across a very dark and dreary console and decided to refinish it. I used 4 coats of stripper and after all of the rubbing etc. came across a very beautiful, quarter sawn oak console of beautiful characteristics. I didn't need any stain and after the polyerathane treatment, a wonderful surprise emerged. I would try Murhphy's oil soap first and see what happens. They may have used lacquer and that will "check" after years of use. As to the bench, I would say that you were correct in saying that years of sitting there has taken its toll. Since there is no finish left on the bench in spots, that may be the color of the original wood too if you think about it. Have fun. Gary ----- Original Message ----- From: Brian Graham <briangraham@sunflower.com> To: DIYapason-L <diyapason-l@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, October 01, 2001 5:28 PM Subject: [Residence Organs] 20's console finish mystery     > Hello out there! > > I was hoping one of you out there could help me > with a wood finish mystery. > > I have an Estey console from 1925. It's Oak with > a dark finish. I'd like very much to know what sort > of products they were using for this type of work > in the 20's, since it is my intention to clean, patch > the spots where the color is missing, and polish, but > not refinish. > > In most places, there is virtually no sheen, and > there certainly is no build-up of finish anywhere > that could be flaked off. The top of the bench is > lighter than anywhere else, as though half of the > color rubbed off on the earlier owner's pants. > > Also, a very light spot on the bench appears to > indicate that prolonged exposure to moisture removes > the color pretty thoroughly. > > A light rubbing with denatured alcohol cleans the > surface, slightly more vigorous rubbing begins to > remove the color. This leads me to believe that > "stain", at least in the modern sense of the word, > was not used. > > Any ideas? > > Thanks!! > > -Brian Graham > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >