DIYAPASON-L Digest #403 - Tuesday, October 2, 2001
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  Decorative  facade pipes
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Re: Decorative  facade pipes
  by "Jon Fick" <jon@VermontFicks.org>
20's console finish mystery
  by "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@sockets.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Decorative  facade pipes
  by "Ed Steltzer" <steltzer@gwi.net>
20's console finish mystery
  by "Brian  Graham" <briangraham@sunflower.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Decorative facade pipes From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2001 01:52:08 EDT     In a message dated 10/1/01 1:43:53 PM, dochome@hotmail.com writes:   >Hi List, >I would like to cut down a broken rank of string pipes for a decorative > >facade. How can I accomplish this neatly. I've seen tube cutters in the > >local hardware store which have cutting wheels . I think it works by >clamping it around a cylinder and continuously rotating it until the = cutting > >wheel/blade scores the pipe/ cylinder. I plan to cut smaller pipes (high > >tin) and larger ones (made of zinc). Thanks in advance for your advice. >Homer >     That tubing cutter would simply crush the high tin pipes likely, most of = us use a bandsaw with a fine blade.       Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: Re: Decorative facade pipes From: "Jon Fick" <jon@VermontFicks.org> Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2001 08:28:13 -0400   Homer,   I've used a small pair of tin snips to cut pipes down and a file to take = off the burr. Marking the cut first is important because if you try it freehand, the end of the cut probably won't meet the beginning of the cut.   Tubing cutters aren't large enough for larger diameter pipes, and I also believe that the backing rollers will marr the pipe; you'd have to paint = it.   My experience with bandsawing any thin-wall tube, organ pipes or = otherwise, is that the blade will catch it and rip it, also try to spin the pipe in your hands. You really can't clamp a pipe in anything; it's too soft.   That left me with tin snips.   Jon Fick Westford, Vermont      
(back) Subject: 20's console finish mystery From: "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@sockets.net> Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2001 09:36:27 -0500   Hi Brian and all the rest,   Your question about console finish is quite good. While I am not a refinisher, I have considerable experience overseeing piano refinishing in my restoration business.   When you said....   > This leads me to believe that >"stain", at least in the modern sense of the word, >was not used.   you were almost correct.   The stains used in the 20's were almost always water based--not the oil based stuff most of us know. Oddly, water based stains are making a comeback.   Once the protective finish has worn off, the underlying stain in the wood can be easily washed off. The top finish coat on your console may be lacquer or varnish. As varnish ages, it "alligators" and becomes opaque. As lacquer ages, it merely flakes off and sometimes turns slightly green. Of course there could other finishes on your console, but I guess it was stained with a water base and then lacquered. Now the lacquer is gone and the stain is easily washed off.   Alcohol is a solvent to both finishes, but much more so to varnish and shellac. Alcohol also easily washes off water based stains.   You might purchase some new water based stains and experiment in color matching. Once that is done you are faced with the dilemma of putting on = a protective coat that will be compatible to the underlying finish.   There is a product made specifically for this task to conserve existing finishes. That product comes in small plastic-like pellets and must be mixed with a solvent and then sprayed on. I am having a senior moment, = and cannot recall the product name, but I can get it if you are interested. = We used it to finish the extremely ornate, Italian renaissance carved piano = in the Krughoff collection. The underlying finish is still there, and the = new top coat can be removed if necessary, leaving the original finish in tact.   It just might be easier to match the color, and the spray on a high = quality clear lacquer, hoping that it will adhere. Find a hidden piece to experiment on.   Keep us posted with your results, and good luck!   Bob Taylor      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Decorative facade pipes From: "Ed Steltzer" <steltzer@gwi.net> Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2001 14:46:14 -0400   Hi Homer - as others have mentioned, a fine tooth saw and patience will do the job. Wrap a piece of cardboard around the pipe and mark the cut line = at the edge of the cardboard. Lay the pipe on a bench with a backstop behind the pipe to steady it. Use a fine tooth hacksaw or a very fine tooth = hobby saw such as an "Xacto". Cut down until you have cut about 1/4" deep, = then rotate the pipe and do some more.   If you are cutting pipes which have slide tuners, the tuning slide can be used instead of the cardboard as a marking guide.   Ed, in Maine.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "homer valenzona" <dochome@hotmail.com> To: <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, October 01, 2001 6:42 PM Subject: [Residence Organs] Decorative facade pipes     > Hi List, > I would like to cut down a broken rank of string pipes for a decorative > facade. How can I accomplish this neatly. I've seen tube cutters in the > local hardware store which have cutting wheels . I think it works by > clamping it around a cylinder and continuously rotating it until the cutting > wheel/blade scores the pipe/ cylinder. I plan to cut smaller pipes (high > tin) and larger ones (made of zinc). Thanks in advance for your advice. > Homer      
(back) Subject: 20's console finish mystery From: "Brian Graham" <briangraham@sunflower.com> Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2001 21:01:22 -0000   Hello again   As you may recall, I posted a message yesterday asking for   A fellow list member was kind enough to suggest that a common console finish of day was clear shellac tinted with anoline dye, sometimes resulting in a purplish color finish.   This is the most logical answer I've had yet, and the lack of heavy finish "build-up" and the fact that the finish is darker in the crevices seem to back up this conclusion.   Anyway, my intention was never to refinish, but only to spruce up the existing finish.   I seem to have found a product that will mask the white haze very well and reveal the nice wood grain beneath as well as patching spots where the cat vomit leached the color out of the bench. Ack!   It's called Howard "Restor-A-Finish". It claims that it won't remove the previous finish, it comes in several colors (including Mahogany), and it says Polyurethane won't stick to it (so it can't be all bad). The bottle suggests applying a beeswax-carnauba wax to finish it off. It's making me a bit light-headed, so I'd definitely recommend good ventilation!   In some locations I did a little scrubbin with mineral spirits first.   It looks great so far. I'll definitely let the list know if I wake up in the morning and the finish has gone bad during the night.   -Brian Graham Lawrence, KS