DIYAPASON-L Digest #404 - Thursday, October 4, 2001
 
Blower Enclosure Questions
  by "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Blower Enclosure Questions
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  Blower Enclosure Questions
  by "Gregory Rister" <grandcornet@earthlink.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Blower Enclosure Questions
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
cleaning zinc pipes
  by "Fr. Larry Covington" <larry.covington@St-Louis.org>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Blower Enclosure Questions
  by "Olliff Weldon" <oweldon2@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Blower Enclosure Questions From: "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 04 Oct 2001 09:07:52 -0400   I am currently in the process of designing a sound enclosure for my 1HP Spencer Orgoblo. I am thinking about using 3/4" MDF material for the enclosure, with a baffled intake (single U-shaped passage insulated on all =   surfaces). I am planning on using the special drill and fasteners for MDF =   if I can find them! My thinking is that MDF, being denser, would be superior to plywood for the enclosure.   For sound insulation, I am considering using 2" Ductboard for the walls = and 1" Ductboard for lining the intake baffle surfaces.   Ductboard is used by HVAC contractors for fabricating ductwork. One side = is foil, cemented to compressed fiberglass. It will be cemented to the = inside of the enclosure using 3M spray adhesive. One HVAC contractor I spoke = with sprays the fiberglass side with hair spray to prevent any future fiber separation!   I plan on 2" clearance all around (from any point on the spencer to the surface of the insulation). The blower will rest on several layers of = felt matting.   Any defects in this plan? Has anyone had experience using Ductboard for insulation?   If the blower is used no more than 1-2 hours at a time, is there any = danger of the Century motor overheating inside the enclosure?   The blower came with an Allen Bradley starter with heaters. I plan on = using 2 x 20amp breakers.   Thanks for any advice.   Dave           _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Blower Enclosure Questions From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Oct 2001 10:38:36 EDT     --part1_c5.173133a7.28edce6c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hello all. Dave I would be concerned that the motor will not get enough cooling unless you placed the intake on the motor side of the box buuuuuut =   would that preheat the air going into the blower inlet and then to the = organ?   Dennis       --part1_c5.173133a7.28edce6c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hello all. Dave I would = be concerned that the motor will not get enough cooling unless you placed = the intake on the motor side of the box buuuuuut would that preheat the = air going into the blower inlet and then to the organ? <BR> <BR>Dennis <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_c5.173133a7.28edce6c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] Blower Enclosure Questions From: "Gregory Rister" <grandcornet@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 4 Oct 2001 18:10:48 -0700   Hi Dave,   I do recommend MDF for the purpose you suggest. Depending upon the amount of sound you need to damp, you may want to use a double thickness (1 1/2") of the stuff. I also recommend sealing the MDF in some manner, whether it be with lacquer, shellac, polyurethane or paint, because I have been reliably advised that MDF can outgas toxic formaldehyde-based gases, particularly when exposed to heat. Sealing solves this problem and also adds some moisture protection.   With regard to keeping the blower motor cool, I would suggest making the enclosure as large as you practically can, so as to allow for some reasonable air circulation within. And you might want to try a trick I have seen used on some other blower enclosures. Sometimes a very small line (say, 3/4" diameter) is drawn off of the static trunk or reservoir) using flexible or pvc line. This is run into the blower enclosure and rigged to blow into the motor. This provides a sort of forced-air = cooling, although it's also a little bit of a leak (a very little one, though). I've never used this technique myself, but I have seen it on a number of installations we service.   Greg Rister Pipe Organ Craftsmen Pomona, California   > [Original Message] > From: Dave McClellan <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com> > To: <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> > Date: 10/04/2001 6:07:52 AM > Subject: [Residence Organs] Blower Enclosure Questions > > I am currently in the process of designing a sound enclosure for my 1HP > Spencer Orgoblo. I am thinking about using 3/4" MDF material for the > enclosure, with a baffled intake (single U-shaped passage insulated on all > surfaces). > > For sound insulation, I am considering using 2" Ductboard... > > If the blower is used no more than 1-2 hours at a time, is there any danger > of the Century motor overheating inside the enclosure? > > _________________________________________________________________ > Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at = http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org       --- Gregory Rister --- grandcornet@earthlink.net --- EarthLink: The #1 provider of the Real Internet.      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Blower Enclosure Questions From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Oct 2001 22:54:41 EDT     In a message dated 10/4/01 8:09:01 AM, deep_tremolo@hotmail.com writes:   >I am currently in the process of designing a sound enclosure for my 1HP > >Spencer Orgoblo. I am thinking about using 3/4" MDF material for the=20 >enclosure, with a baffled intake (single U-shaped passage insulated on >all surfaces). I am planning on using the special drill and fasteners for >MDF if I can find them!=20   Yuk, I hate that MDF garbage, it's heavy, soft, brittle, murder on saw blade= s=20 being it's mostly glue binder, and creates dust when cut I wonder how safe i= t=20 is to be around. We simply use 3/4x3/4 screw blocks inside for the screws to go into becaus= e=20 MDF simply won't hold threads     My thinking is that MDF, being denser, would be=20 >superior to plywood for the enclosure.   I would prefer plywood for several reasons, we also line the inside of the=20 box with accoustic board, so really it doesn't seem to make a lot of=20 difference on the type of board used. I'm not font of ply or MDF for looks either, if your lines are a little off=20 between panels and you want to sand to there is no raised edge where one=20 panel meets another ( we glue and bisquit a lot ) you go right through the= =20 now tissue-paper thin veneer they seem to tack on this stuff these days.   > >For sound insulation, I am considering using 2" Ductboard for the walls >and=20 >1" Ductboard for lining the intake baffle surfaces. > Ductboard is used by HVAC contractors for fabricating ductwork. One side >is foil, cemented to compressed fiberglass. It will be cemented to the=20 inside > of the enclosure using 3M spray adhesive. One HVAC contractor I spoke >with sprays the fiberglass side with hair spray to prevent any future fibe= r >separation!   Good grief, you might want to read this information about soft fiberglass as= =20 used for insulation, ducts etc and make your own choices, after reading some= =20 of this information from several sources, including some case histories=20 medical related, I decided it's not something I want in my house. An organ=20 blower would put out I believe more velocity of wind in ducts than a=20 furnace/airconditioner, so it would stand to reason this stuff lining the=20 insides of ducts will eventually break down and these fibers start=20 circulating all over the house;   http://www.sustainableenterprises.com/fin/House/sleuthing.htm http://www.sustainableenterprises.com/fin/victims.htm   Ways to find out whether your house has fiberglass contamination   By Robert Horowitz A fiberglass contaminated home is more common than you might think.   The widespread use of fiberglass insulation and exposed-fiberglass-lined=20 ducts in modern--particularly American--construction is sowing the seeds for= =20 an environmental health catastrophe. Overall shoddy construction standards o= n=20 today's mass-produced homes further increase the odds that there is some=20 amount of fiberglass in your home environment..   Many people will never notice a small amount of fiberglass in their living=20 space. But that same amount could trigger an intense allergy-like reaction i= n=20 a person with a damaged immune system. With moderate amounts of fiberglass i= n=20 the living space, nearly all occupants become progressively ill over a perio= d=20 of weeks or months. When large amounts of fiberglass are present in the home= ,=20 even the most robust individuals become noticeably ill within a few days or=20 weeks.   SNIP FIN--the Fiberglass Information Network-- Service to the on-line community=20 since 1995.   Lilly Brown http://www.sustainableenterprises.com/fin/Victims/brown.htm became sick while working at a Children's Center in a posh Palm Springs,=20 California, suburb.=A0 A poorly designed and haphazardly installed heating a= nd=20 air conditioning system spewed fiberglass around the building.=A0 The case w= as=20 settled for $825,000.   The Markel family =20 http://www.sustainableenterprises.com/fin/Victims/markel.htm suffered greatly because their air conditioner, immersed in an attic full of= =20 fiberglass, spread the tiny fibers all over their home. The family's two=20 boys, ages 4 and 6, appear to have permanent respiratory disease.=20 * The Glass family=20 http://www.sustainableenterprises.com/fin/Victims/glass.htm (not their real name) bought a new house in the Southwest and became sick=20 soon after. You can probably guess the reason why.     >Any defects in this plan?=20   Sounds good except the fiberglass part!     Has anyone had experience using Ductboard for >insulation?   What about some kind of bumpy textured foam rubber type sheeting, the kind=20 I've seen used to pack computer things in...     Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: cleaning zinc pipes From: "Fr. Larry Covington" <larry.covington@St-Louis.org> Date: Thu, 4 Oct 2001 22:09:54 -0500     Greetings to list,   Does anyone out there have some favorite methods for cleaning zinc pipes? = I am curious as to what is most effective especially when there is = oxidation. When zinc pipes are cleaned what is the concensus on re-lacquering them?   Thanks,   Larry  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Blower Enclosure Questions From: "Olliff Weldon" <oweldon2@mindspring.com> Date: Thu, 4 Oct 2001 23:30:53 -0400     In stead of fiberglass you might consider SONEX acoustical foam. I comes in several thicknesses, for different frequency attenuation, as well as several foam materials. One type is made of melamine foam making the material almost fireproof.   A source of the material is McMaster-Carr in Atlanta.   Olliff Weldon