DIYAPASON-L Digest #379 - Wednesday, September 5, 2001
 
Resend: Recommended sources for replacement of missing pipes
  by "Dave McClellan" <drmc@speedfactory.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Resend: Recommended sources for replacement of mi
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Wurlitzer relay for parts or ?
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: New Member Bio and Organ Design Question
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Resend: Recommended sources for replacement of missing pipes From: "Dave McClellan" <drmc@speedfactory.net> Date: Wed, 5 Sep 2001 06:41:05 -0400   Pardon the resend, but I never received a copy of a Digest in which this message appeared, and therefore received no responses.   I have a rank with one missing pipes. What is the recommended method of acquiring a replacement? I'm sure the residence builders on this list = have dealt with this problem before. I would imagine that there is a whole = range of possible costs and waiting times.   In my case, the missing pipe is from the Great 2' Fifteenth (Principal), = 61 pipes. The scale of low C is about 70. Wind is 3.75". The pipe missing = is F above Middle C (speaking length aproximately 4"), slide tuned, spotted metal.   Any estimate on cost if adjacent pipes were sent to a parts supplier such = as OSI, or a pipe maker, and a suitable pipe made or provided, and voiced to match?   Any recommendations?   Thanks, Dave      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Resend: Recommended sources for replacement of missin... From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Wed, 5 Sep 2001 10:37:34 EDT     --part1_6e.f93f0e9.28c792ae_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Dave, you need to send, to a pipe maker, the pipes on either side to = get a replacement. You might talk to a pipe builder first to see what suggest. Have fun. Dennis <A HREF=3D"http://www.arschopp.com/">A.R. Schopp's Sons, Inc. = America's Largest Maker of Organ Pipes</A>   --part1_6e.f93f0e9.28c792ae_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hi Dave, you need to = send, to a pipe maker, the pipes on either side to get a <BR>replacement. <BR>You might talk to a pipe builder first to see what suggest. <BR>Have fun. <BR>Dennis <A HREF=3D"http://www.arschopp.com/">A.R. Schopp's Sons, Inc. = America's Largest Maker of Organ Pipes</A> </FONT></HTML>   --part1_6e.f93f0e9.28c792ae_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Wurlitzer relay for parts or ? From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Wed, 05 Sep 2001 12:59:38 -0700   Hi, List. I'm starting the process of disposing of my surplus organ pipes and parts. These are located in Lakeport, CA, a northern California town. Most is fair to good rebuildable condition (believe me, I'd tell you if it wasn't). I need to get rid of a Wurlitzer style 235 relay, not complete, but a good source of magnets and parts. This is free to the first one who gets here to pick it up. Come on, you Wurlitzer nuts! I KNOW you're out there... Also, I'll have many ranks of pipes, most complete and in good condition. When I get further into the storage shed (dry, by the way) I'll post a = list. To start with, I'd like to sell an E. M. Skinner Trombone 16', 12 pipes $400. One or two resonators have seperated joints, easily resoldered. This set is NOT mitred, so the longest pipe is about 12'-13' long. Pressure (written on low CCC) is 7-1/2". I'd prefer these items be picked up, as I'm not in the best of health, and building crates etc. takes me away from projects to which I'd much rather apply myself. Reply to this email, or call me at 707-272-7070. There is voicemail on this phone, so you may feel free to call anytime, day or night.   Thanks!     Regards, Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA NAWCC 140818 http://www.cuckoobob.com alternate mailto:cuckoobob@eudoramail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: New Member Bio and Organ Design Question From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Wed, 5 Sep 2001 23:32:41 EDT     --part1_120.42e1ed2.28c84859_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi DIYers:   I found this site through Bart Kleinweber. My name is Roy Kersey. I'm a psychologist in Knoxville, Tennessee. I learned piano in my teens from my =   uncle, a band musician, church organist and piano/organ salesman who also taught me to tune and left me his tools. When I should have been writing a =   dissertation at the University of Tennessee (I did finish eventually), I = was taking voice lessons (bass-baritone) and teaching myself the pedalboard on = a 2/20 Schantz in the Music Department (~1976). I haven't had much = opportunity to play the organ since then, but recently decided that, with = semi-retirement an option in a few years, I might look into working with an organ builder part time. I have been reading about organ building and that led me to = this list and to the idea that I might build my own instrument. Which leads to = my question:   Like all of us, I'd love to have a large instrument, but I don't know = where I will eventually be in five or ten years, so I'd like to build an = instrument which would fit in the average living room. The case footprint I've been discussing would be about ten feet wide, five feet deep and about seven = and a half feet high (fits under the average eight foot ceiling). I will be building a workshop on an existing foundation this fall (I hope) with approximate dimensions of 12 x 32 and I hope to assemble an organ in this shed. From there, the shed could be finished out as a music shed, or the organ might move into my current living room or into another residence. = My preference is for a Baroque type instrument which would be appropriate for =   JSB and composers of that era (Buxtehude, Scheidt, etc.). While I would = love to have a tracker, I've been advised to go direct electric (much simpler = and more flexible) and to unify to get the most out of the space that will be available. This seems to make sense, as I don't want to bite off more = than I can chew and never get finished. Of course I am aware that unit organs do =   have limitations when it comes to polyphonic music especially. I have = also been told that using an extended rank for more than one stop means voicing = it such that it can't provide the kind of blend and balance that separate = stops can have. It has been suggested that I try to build a three or four rank = DE organ on a unit chest such as those built by Wicks in from 60's thru the 80's.   I would be interested in comments from the list members on this. Particularly: Could a four rank unit organ work for the Baroque = repetoire? What more could fit in the footprint I described above? Could there be = room for expansion beyond four ranks in that space? (manual reeds, a pedal = reed, additional stops/ranks, mixtures, upperwork). Would others on the list suggest doing something else? I could build a bigger case in the shed and =   even raise the shed roof over eight feet, but I might have a problem = fitting the organ in my eventual domecile. Of course, I could leave that problem = to be solved later (or give the finished organ to one of you <BG>).   I am glad to have found this list. I've learned a lot already from = reading all the Archives available last weekend (whew!). I just wish there were = more Archives available for a further "organ-fix". I look forward to hearing = from you all.   Best Regards, Roy Kersey   --part1_120.42e1ed2.28c84859_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hi DIYers: <BR> <BR>I found this site through Bart Kleinweber. &nbsp;My name is Roy = Kersey. &nbsp;I'm a <BR>psychologist in Knoxville, Tennessee. &nbsp;I learned piano in my = teens from my <BR>uncle, a band musician, church organist and piano/organ salesman who = also <BR>taught me to tune and left me his tools. When I should have been = writing a <BR>dissertation at the University of Tennessee (I did finish eventually), I was <BR>taking voice lessons (bass-baritone) and teaching myself the = pedalboard on a <BR>2/20 Schantz in the Music Department (~1976). &nbsp;I haven't had much = opportunity <BR>to play the organ since then, but recently decided that, with = semi-retirement <BR>an option in a few years, I might look into working with an organ = builder <BR>part time. &nbsp;I have been reading about organ building and that led = me to this <BR>list and to the idea that I might build my own instrument. &nbsp;Which = leads to my <BR>question: <BR> <BR>Like all of us, I'd love to have a large instrument, but I don't know = where I <BR>will eventually be in five or ten years, so I'd like to build an = instrument <BR>which would fit in the average living room. &nbsp;The case footprint = I've been <BR>discussing would be about ten feet wide, five feet deep and about = seven and a <BR>half feet high (fits under the average eight foot ceiling). &nbsp;I = will be <BR>building a workshop on an existing foundation this fall (I hope) with <BR>approximate dimensions of 12 x 32 and I hope to assemble an organ in = this <BR>shed. &nbsp;From there, the shed could be finished out as a music = shed, or the <BR>organ might move into my current living room or into another = residence. &nbsp;My <BR>preference is for a Baroque type instrument which would be appropriate = for <BR>JSB and composers of that era (Buxtehude, Scheidt, etc.). &nbsp;While = I would love <BR>to have a tracker, I've been advised to go direct electric (much = simpler and <BR>more flexible) and to unify to get the most out of the space that will = be <BR>available. &nbsp;This seems to make sense, as I don't want to bite off = more than I <BR>can chew and never get finished. &nbsp;Of course I am aware that unit = organs do <BR>have limitations when it comes to polyphonic music especially. &nbsp;I = have also <BR>been told that using an extended rank for more than one stop means = voicing it <BR>such that it can't provide the kind of blend and balance that separate = stops <BR>can have. &nbsp;It has been suggested that I try to build a three or = four rank DE <BR>organ on a unit chest such as those built by Wicks in from 60's thru = the <BR>80's. &nbsp; <BR> <BR>I would be interested in comments from the list members on this. = &nbsp; <BR>Particularly: &nbsp;Could a four rank unit organ work for the Baroque = repetoire? &nbsp; <BR>What more could fit in the footprint I described above? &nbsp;Could = there be room <BR>for expansion beyond four ranks in that space? (manual reeds, a pedal = reed, <BR>additional stops/ranks, mixtures, upperwork). &nbsp;Would others on = the list <BR>suggest doing something else? &nbsp;I could build a bigger case in the = shed and <BR>even raise the shed roof over eight feet, but I might have a problem = fitting <BR>the organ in my eventual domecile. &nbsp;Of course, I could leave that = problem to <BR>be solved later (or give the finished organ to one of you &lt;BG&gt;). =   <BR> <BR>I am glad to have found this list. &nbsp;I've learned a lot already = from reading <BR>all the Archives available last weekend (whew!). &nbsp;I just wish = there were more <BR>Archives available for a further "organ-fix". &nbsp;I look forward to = hearing from <BR>you all. <BR> <BR>Best Regards, <BR>Roy Kersey</FONT></HTML>   --part1_120.42e1ed2.28c84859_boundary--