DIYAPASON-L Digest #393 - Friday, September 21, 2001
 
Re: Reisner Direct Action Valve question
  by "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com>
Re: Reisner Direct Action Valve question
  by "Jon Fick" <jon@VermontFicks.org>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Reisner Direct Action Valve question
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Reisner Direct Action Valve question
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Swell Shutters
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Reisner Direct Action Valve question From: "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2001 06:35:23 -0400   Jon Fick wrote:   >We have Reisner Direct Valve Actions in a pair of chests (4' Spitz >Principle.) These magnet/pouch combination units default to an open = state >when there is no wind pressure. That is, the magnet armature falls by >gravity and would allow the pouch valve to open if there were actually >pressure at the time.   Most of my chests also use Reisner DVA's, but only on the LARGER pipes. = The smaller pipes use Reisner 601 magnets which are similar to Wicks' Direct Electric magnets. And the felt/leather valve sizes on those vary = depending on the size of the pipe hole.   In my case, the DVAs are in a CLOSED position with no wind, held there by = a spring inside the unit, beneath the valve and hidden by the leather diaphragm. No whimpering occurs. I am running 3.75" of wind. Perhaps as =   one list member wrote, the wind pressure is too high. I have not looked = at the OSI catalog recently, but is there not a DVA available that is adjustable for wind pressure? Could the closing spring be missing? Is there an adjustment for the armature?   Dave       _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp    
(back) Subject: Re: Reisner Direct Action Valve question From: "Jon Fick" <jon@VermontFicks.org> Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2001 08:53:34 -0400   > I have had I similar problem with my home organ , and I found that a > bigger rectifier took care of the problem there was no more sluggish > specah and the action was as it was supposed to be , try a new rectifier > then if that dose not fix it try new armature   > it sounds like he is attempting to use these on a > higher pressure than they were designed for, OR it may be that the > pouch/pallet size is too large for "small pipe holes".   Thanks for the replies and suggestions. Other unrelated chests in this organ use the DVA's (various sizes and vintages) without problem. There's adequate voltage (~13V) and WP is 2.75" (actually a bit below minimum = rated pressure). This sluggish action occurs at 4" during tests so I know that 2.75" is not the cause.   The unfortunate part is that whoever built the pair of chests drilled very nice exhaust holes with a Forstner bit, but a slightly smaller diameter = than the armature housing. You can plainly see the removable cap, but you = can't remove it. I'll have to remove the pipes, upend the chests, remove the bottom boards, and remove each valve to replace the armatures if that's what's required. I may at that time decide to drill the exhaust holes larger! Of course, I will never have to replace the armatures again so perhaps the extra effort is not necessary.   Jon      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Reisner Direct Action Valve question From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2001 11:22:10 EDT     --part1_70.10574c20.28dcb522_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Could there be broken spring's? I just had some of these releathered and = the springs were replaced. Now for those who wanted to see Moller glass shades they are out of hiding =   and I will have the shutter bug take pictures soon. Have fun Dennis   --part1_70.10574c20.28dcb522_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Could there be broken = spring's? I just had some of these releathered and the springs were = replaced. <BR>Now for those who wanted to see Moller glass shades they are out of = hiding and I will have the shutter bug take pictures soon. <BR>Have fun <BR>Dennis</FONT></HTML>   --part1_70.10574c20.28dcb522_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Reisner Direct Action Valve question From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2001 20:39:47 -0500   At 11:58 AM 9/20/01 -0400, you wrote: >We have Reisner Direct Valve Actions in a pair of chests <snip>   Hi, Jon!   I'll offer one more course of action to deal with your Reisner DVA's. (these *are* those pot-metal all-in-one units, no?)   I've had experience with an organ using many of these things, and it also would develop troublesome notes. We discovered, somehow, that the cork gasket between the unit and the underside of the toeboard was the fault. = I really never studied the problem thoroughly, but when servicing that = organ, I quickly learned which ranks had those actions, and that if any of those notes started acting wierd, to drop the bottom board and the unit, and give it a new gasket (from the supply kept on hand nearby). I seem to recall that the gaskets would become compressed, thereby changing the operating tolerances of the armatures, thereby making them not work right. (but please don't quote me too far on that...!<g>)   So, before you go *too* far into replacing/rebuilding the things, try contacting OSI and ask them about replacement gaskets for the Reisners. Hopefully, you'll be pleasantly surprised with the results.   Hope this helps --   Tim Bovard Nichols and Simpson, Inc. Little Rock, AR  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Swell Shutters From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2001 21:10:28 -0500   At 11:29 AM 9/20/01 -0500, you wrote: <snip> >That slight movement beyond the high center point in the arc >allows the shutters to "snap" shut. The return spring in >that position only serves to increase the tension on the >"snapped shut" shutters. > >This is a relatively new problem. I have not experienced >this condition in the previous 10 years. > >Oh, ...the organ was built by Schantz, just to identify the >swell mechanisms. <snip>   Hi, Richard!   If this is standard "Schantz", those are whiffletree swell engines. If = you examine the axle/arm arrangement atop the engine itself, you should see that at least one of the "arms" (the one connected to the shade linkage, IIRC) has a couple of setscrews such to be adjustable on its axle. I submit that it was simply set *just a bit* too close when installed and adjusted (and that that time was *not* in the depths of humid Texas summer dog-days, as it is now).   The solution: study the linkage for a moment, to determine which way to move that adjustable arm to alleviate the binding shades. Find the large spring affixed to the shades somewhere that keeps tension on the whole apparatus, and take it loose on one end. (if the spring is attached to something via a length of chain, be sure to notice how many chain-links from one end or the other it is hooked at, such to be able to return it to the same place for correct tension) You'll also have to take loose the spring on the engine itself. Then loosen the setscrews, move the arm a hair in the correct direction, and tighten it again. Replace the springs in their previous location. (if the spring on the shades themselves seemed overly "tight" when removed, you might also try relaxing it a link or two, assuming that the shades will still work correctly with the reduced = "tension")   There is also likely some point within the trace from the engine to the shades where one can slightly lengthen/shorten the linkage -- but it = really sounds to me like the adjustment that needs help in your case is the arm = on the engine itself. It should work from (roughly) "7 o'clock" to just = *shy* of "12 o'clock" if one tries to imagine the arm as a clock hand.   The final step is the most important.   Go to the console, turn the organ on, register something with lots of 8' flutes and all the trems, and play a rousing rendition of "Mack the Knife" (or something similar <g>) all the while flapping those shades furiously. If you adjusted the wrong way, or didn't retighten things enough, you'll soon find out! <lol>   Seriously, hope this helps. Good luck!!   All Best,   Tim