DIYAPASON-L Digest #397 - Tuesday, September 25, 2001
 
Spencer Orgoblo, Century motor
  by "Jon Fick" <jon@VermontFicks.org>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Spencer Orgoblo, Century motor
  by "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Spencer Orgoblo, Century motor
  by "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Spencer Orgoblo, Century motor From: "Jon Fick" <jon@VermontFicks.org> Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 11:31:06 -0400   I've inquired about the Century motor in our Spencer blower in past = months. I'm getting to the point where I may have to replace the motor with a = modern motor. (I know, I know...there are valid reasons to keep the old Century. It runs all day with minimal thermal increase, etc. But these things need to be weighed against issues of reliability and frustration. )   The problem is that occasionally the motor does not get out of start mode. The brushes don't snap away abruptly. The brushes don't suddenly "snap" away from the commutator strip; instead they slowly drift away and the = motor fails to reach a speed where the run windings can sustain it alone. (The blue arcing is impressive in this mode.) I have the Spencer manual and = have tried various adjustments of the centrifugal assembly, from early to late release, but nothing guarantees that the motor will start every time.   The question I'm asking is this. If we get to a point where we replace = the 1/2HP Century motor, does anyone have suggestions on what type of motor to use in this application? I suspect it will be a capacitor-start motor, perhaps rated at 0.75HP to run a bit cooler. Ball bearings rather than sleeves. I would be inclined to direct-drive the fan and weld up some mounting arrangement to fit the current bed. That, rather than mount it above the Century and belt drive it through the Century tail shaft.   Thanks.   Jon Fick Christ Memorial Church Williston, Vermont http://www.ChristMemorialChurch.org    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Spencer Orgoblo, Century motor From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 10:50:19 -0500   Jon wrote:   > I've inquired about the Century motor in our Spencer blower in past months. > I'm getting to the point where I may have to replace the motor with a modern > motor.....     Hi Jon, I have been through what you are experiencing and trust me you don't want to do this! Bite the bullet and find another blower with a little more umph than what you need. New blowers are expensive but you get what you pay for... I have a Spencer Bobco which I purchased new in 1982 = and it has given me 19 years of trouble free service and looks not a day older than when I purchased it. Replacement motors are often very expensive because of their unique specs. I wish you all the best. Please think about this very carefully before purchasing a motor which you can' return and which causes you much heartache and grief.   Robert Eversman Mineral Point, WI    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Spencer Orgoblo, Century motor From: "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 17:48:25 -0400   At 11:31 AM 9/25/2001 -0400, you wrote:   >The question I'm asking is this. If we get to a point where we replace = the >1/2HP Century motor, does anyone have suggestions on what type of motor = to >use in this application? I suspect it will be a capacitor-start motor, >perhaps rated at 0.75HP to run a bit cooler. Ball bearings rather than >sleeves. I would be inclined to direct-drive the fan and weld up some >mounting arrangement to fit the current bed. That, rather than mount it >above the Century and belt drive it through the Century tail shaft.   Jon. If this blower is belt driven from the motor, then it would be an = easy task to find a replacement motor. As far as direct coupling a motor that was belt driven, the motor would need to turn the correct RPM's. Standard motors only come in a few different RPM's. If the motor is direct coupled now, with the fan blades attached directly to a special extended shaft, then I think it would be very difficult to replace the motor as one with a =   special shaft would need to be made. Or to use a standard motor, one would =   need to cut off the shaft of the old motor and then support it with a pillow block bearing, then couple the new motor to the existing shaft with =   a flexible coupler. I'm sorry, but I'm not clear on the construction of your blower. My Spencer is a 1 HP and has a GE capacitor start motor with the fan blades mounted directly to the motor shaft. When I wrote Spencer = to find out how old the blower is using the serial number, they told me it = was from the 30's. This means that the motor had been replaced at some point with I suspect a special designed one. Capacitor start motors hadn't been thought of yet in the 30's, at least that I'm aware of.   Eric     >Thanks. > >Jon Fick