DIYAPASON-L Digest #562 - Thursday, April 18, 2002
 
Moller Keyboards
  by "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Moller Keyboards
  by "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu>
pipes for sale
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Moller Keyboards
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Moller Keyboards
  by "noel" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Moller Keyboards
  by <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Moller Keyboards From: "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 09:05:44 -0500   Good Friday-eve to the gang! =20 ((Are we a gang? Flock? Group? or what?))   My home console is a 1982 Moller that was in Orchestra Hall in Chicago. = The keyboards have, what I have been told, is Moller's "tracker" touch. = To put it simply, it is a VERY heavy action. Even friends that play big = trackers remarks how heavy the touch is. I have thought that it was = just good physical exercise for me. When I go to play other = instruments, there is always a period of time to get use to playing on = lighter touch keyboards.=20   My practice time at home is increasing as I am trying to teach Eleanor, = my pipe organ, some new music for a big program on a new instrument in = the fall - lots of new music with lots of notes. My fingers and arms = are getting tired after some time of practicing. SO........   I have never "played" with keyboard's insides and know little about them = - just wiring contacts. I do know there are some "tension" type = adjustments, plastic or leather nuts to adjust, I think. What I am = getting at is, can these keyboards be adjusted? Since the feel requires = a lot of pressure and then the key goes down easily, is there something = else involved besides a nut tension adjustment? Is this something that = I can do? Any thoughts?   Thanks for any information and suggestions.   Craig (the one with strong fingers and arms!)  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Moller Keyboards From: "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 10:16:13 -0400   At 09:05 AM 4/18/2002 -0500, you wrote: >Good Friday-eve to the gang!     Are you sure you wrote this Friday evening?      
(back) Subject: pipes for sale From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 10:40:25 -0700   Hi people,   Weve started selling stuff again to fund the highschool organ. Currently we have a 61 note Kilgen theatre Diapason, and a 49 note Austin Classical tuba on Ebay. if you're interested please have a look. It's for a good cause. Will have a lot of percussions up soon too.   John V   FDR High School project - NYTOS  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Moller Keyboards From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 10:44:53 -0700   Hi, Craig and List. I'm not sure how Moller achieved the 'tracker touch', but one way was to put a bar of magnets above the keys just ahead of the fulcrum, or near the back of the tail of the key. The key or a metal = piece attached to the key was actually in contact with the magnet, so that the attachment of the magnet to the key would have to be broken before the key could be depressed. This was supposed to simulate the 'pluck' of a = tracker pallet; heavy at first, and diminishing as the key was depressed and the pallet opened.   At 09:05 AM 4/18/02 -0500, Elders, Craig wrote: >Good Friday-eve to the gang! > ((Are we a gang? Flock? Group? or what?)) > >My home console is a 1982 Moller that was in Orchestra Hall in Chicago. The keyboards have, what I have been told, is Moller's "tracker" touch. = To put it simply, it is a VERY heavy action. Even friends that play big trackers remarks how heavy the touch is. I have thought that it was just good physical exercise for me. When I go to play other instruments, there is always a period of time to get use to playing on lighter touch = keyboards. > >My practice time at home is increasing as I am trying to teach Eleanor, = my pipe organ, some new music for a big program on a new instrument in the fall - lots of new music with lots of notes. My fingers and arms are getting tired after some time of practicing. SO........ > >I have never "played" with keyboard's insides and know little about them = - just wiring contacts. I do know there are some "tension" type = adjustments, plastic or leather nuts to adjust, I think. What I am getting at is, can these keyboards be adjusted? Since the feel requires a lot of pressure = and then the key goes down easily, is there something else involved besides a nut tension adjustment? Is this something that I can do? Any thoughts? > >Thanks for any information and suggestions. > >Craig >(the one with strong fingers and arms!) > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > >   Regards, Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA http://home.jps.net/~rrloesch/index.htm   "Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep." Scott Adams, "The Dilbert Principle".    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Moller Keyboards From: "noel" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 15:57:21 -0400   Moller used a toggle switch to achieve this effect on many of their = instruments.   nj  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Moller Keyboards From: <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 17:30:04 -0500   Hi, Craig!   Tracker-touch keyboards I've had experience with get the extra 'feel' from =   a spring mounted under each key, usually at the outermost part of the keyframe from the pivot point (under the fronts of the keys). This spring =   is made of flat steel bent into a "c" shape (sorta) with one end riding on =   a post protruding down from the underside of each key vertically, and the other end riding on a post protruding from the back of the keyframe horizontally. Pushing the key downwards causes this spring to offer extra =   resistance at the beginning of key movement, but as the key continues downwards, the spring reaches and overcomes its 'flip point' and ceases to =   work against the key's motion. (which does produce a 'feel' resembling that of a squishy, poorly regulated tracker action...but that's another issue entirely! <g>) The action of this spring is similar in operation to =   the spring action of a typical stoptab unit -- once you push it "so far" (halfway or so, usually), the spring takes over and helps/finishes pushing =   it down for you.   Springs which adjust the actual key *tension* are a different matter entirely, and are arranged differently. This is likely what you're seeing =   with the adjustable nuts.   Your keyboards sound like they might benefit from both removing the tracker-touch springs, AND loosening the tension of the keys!! <g>   Hope a little of this makes some sense!   Cordially,   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR (who's got several bags full of t-t springs laying around somewhere if anyone needs a few -- *I'll* never use 'em!!)