DIYAPASON-L Digest #613 - Friday, August 2, 2002
 
Drilling pipe racks
  by "Drew Taylor" <drewt@loritsu.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  Drilling pipe racks
  by "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu>
Drilling pipe racks (LONG!)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
 

(back) Subject: Drilling pipe racks From: "Drew Taylor" <drewt@loritsu.com> Date: Fri, 02 Aug 2002 14:02:00 -0400   Okay here's another one.   What is the best and most efficient way to drill pipe racks to fit a = toeboard precisely? I use forstner bits on a drill press and drill the rackboard = first then the toeboard while they are clamped. It is still hard to get the = pipes to stand straight, espically when dealing with conical metal pipes.   I used to drill the rackboard and stick it on the chest before drilling = the toeboard, then stick the pipe in the rack and scribe a center point for = the toe hole, which seemed to work better but still not perfect.   So now I need an expert explination on how it "should" be done. Also, how = would I drill a fresh rackboard to match an existing toeboard that already has = valves in it?     -Drew Taylor      
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] Drilling pipe racks From: "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu> Date: Fri, 2 Aug 2002 13:16:19 -0500   TGIF to you Drew.   Saw your note and know that others will share what they do or what they = have done. So here is my story.   After I layout, or transfer the pipe locations onto the rack board, I = tack (small nails, some call these threadless screws) the rack board to = the toe board. I then drill a pilot hole through both, something like a = 1/8" bit. Also while they are "together" I drill holes for rack pins. = Then I separate them and get on with the business of drilling the rack = and toe boards. That way you have the same "center" for each as well as = a perfect alignment for the rack pins. I also use the forstner bits and = drill 1/2 way from each direction on both the toe and rack boards - that = way no splintering anywhere. =20   By the way, I have seen some people use a larger size bit for the = underside of the rack boards. As we know, the pipe feet, with their V = shape will not be the same size at the bottom of the rack board hole as = it is at the top. And if you are like me, I just hate to have to go = back and file and clean up the mess afterwards. So that might make it = easier for a perfect fit more of the time. (By the way, I saw this = method after I completed my 17 chests.)   So there you have my 2 cents worth!   Have fun drilling and drilling and drilling...   Craig Elders   -----Original Message----- From: Drew Taylor [mailto:drewt@loritsu.com] Sent: Friday, August 02, 2002 1:02 PM To: Residence Organ List Subject: [Residence Organs] Drilling pipe racks     Okay here's another one.=20   What is the best and most efficient way to drill pipe racks to fit a = toeboard=20 precisely? I use forstner bits on a drill press and drill the rackboard = first=20 then the toeboard while they are clamped. It is still hard to get the = pipes to=20 stand straight, espically when dealing with conical metal pipes.=20   I used to drill the rackboard and stick it on the chest before drilling = the=20 toeboard, then stick the pipe in the rack and scribe a center point for = the toe=20 hole, which seemed to work better but still not perfect.   So now I need an expert explination on how it "should" be done. Also, = how would=20 I drill a fresh rackboard to match an existing toeboard that already has = valves=20 in it?     -Drew Taylor       DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own=20 Residence Pipe Organs. HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Drilling pipe racks (LONG!) From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Fri, 02 Aug 2002 14:29:59 -0500     Drew Taylor wrote: > What is the best and most efficient way to drill pipe racks to fit a = toeboard > precisely? I use forstner bits on a drill press and drill the rackboard = first > then the toeboard while they are clamped. It is still hard to get the = pipes to > stand straight, espically when dealing with conical metal pipes.   There are two different ways:   #1) We used to drill our Rackboard holes undersized and then use conical shaped "branding irons" that were heated cherry red hot in a gas heating furnace and then burn the Rackboard holes to the correct size by trial-and-error fitting of the pipes until the holes are just right. One has to wait a few seconds in order to allow the wood to cool before putting in the pipe, otherwise you'll scorch the pipe metal with the charred wood!   Such Irons could be fabricated in a machine shop, but the organ supply firm of Laukhuff in Germany sells these already made up. We used to use this method for years, and after sanding and lacquering, the black charred edge looks very sharp and handsome.   #2) We recently had a set of 4 conical-shaped Racking Reamers fabricated to drawings supplied to us through the courtesy of Jan Rowland, who himself used to make and sell these, but no longer does. We had the work done in a local machine shop and the set of four cost us a little over a thousand dollars, so it was NOT an inexpensive proposition. However, they have been well worth the investment for us; particularly for last-minute on-the-job fitting where method #1 would be impractical.   If you're having new Windchests built professionally, the better supply companies such as Duys and Nicholson in Northfield Minnesota can loan you a Racking Jig that allows you to determine the sizes of Rackboard holes ahead of time, which they can then match exactly on their C-N-C Machine by transmitting them the information for each rank of pipes.   Unfortunately, our years of experience and looking for a better way has shown that there is really no "quick and dirty", nor inexpensive way to fit pipes to Rackboards -especially the larger ones. The small ones are relatively simple because the feet on them are relatively straight and the bigger Drill Index sets have a variety of sizes available to accommodate fitting them. However, larger sizes of drill bit have rather large "gaps" in the standard sizes available. Moreover, the larger the bits are, the more expensive they are.   > So now I need an expert explination on how it "should" be done.   Normal practice is to clamp the Rackboard to the Toeboard and "center-spot" the holes with a very small bit through both boards, and then enlarge from there as needed for both the Toeboards and Rackboards. Most woodworkers use Brad-point bits, which fit the center spots exactly and ensure perfect alignment.   > Also, how would I drill a fresh rackboard to match an existing toeboard = that already has valves in it?   By laying a piece of Brown wrapping paper over the Toeboard, taping it down, and then tracing the outlines of the Toe-holes. Afterward, the centers of those holes are found using metal pipe patterns. The pattern is then laid over new Rackboard stock, the holes center-spotted and then the racking process can begin.   Something that can greatly aid the process of racking is to make up a jig with a height (usually 5" to the top for standard Rack Pins) exactly as the Rackboard you're intending to make, and then create a chart by trial fitting the pipes to the jig, and then using a calipers to measure the diameter of the foot at that point. If doing reeds, we usually felt the Rackboards to prevent rattles, so we add 1/4" extra for the thickness of the felt we use. The only other way, although not terribly efficient (and it usually doesn't cut very "clean"-looking holes!) is to use an adjustable circle cutter. If you do this, however, BEWARE: Clamp your stock down and use the SLOWEST feed speed possible on the drill Press. NEVER EVER try to do this by hand with a drill motor!!   Unless you have the aforementioned reamers, you'll find out in the long run that it is usually more time and cost efficient to just go ahead and replace the Rackboards. We always use Baltic Birch Plywood for ours, rather than solid lumber, as this prevents splitting. Trying to enlarge existing holes is risky business with most bits available to homeowners and false economy.   Hope this is of some help. Unfortunately, the very nature of this work typically mandates some costly tooling in order for the results to be professional looking.   Faithfully, -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL