DIYAPASON-L Digest #629 - Wednesday, August 21, 2002
 
Re: DIYAPASON-L Digest #628 - 08/20/02
  by "Mickey Sadler" <msadler@netset.com>
Whiting and soldering
  by <d.doerschuk@att.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: DIYAPASON-L Digest #628 - 08/20/02 From: "Mickey Sadler" <msadler@netset.com> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 11:59:38 -0400   >DIYAPASON-L Digest #628 - Tuesday, August 20, 2002 > > Whiting and soldering > by "Pieter Smit" <pieter@cadence-engineering.co.za> > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Whiting and soldering >From: "Pieter Smit" <pieter@cadence-engineering.co.za> >Date: Tue, 20 Aug 2002 17:17:42 +0200 > >Dear List, > >Thank you very much for the information. > >What is so special about Gum Arabic that it needs reporting to = authorities? >Is there a substitute for it that is not such a problem? > >Greetings, >Pieter Smit >pieter@cadence-engineering.co.za >   Hi All,   My wife is a wedding cake designer and baker. She uses gum arabic as a binder and emulsifier in making gum past for flowers, etc. It is also used in the dirnk industry to stabilize flavors and essential oils. I saw that an artist uses it in painting to outline figures so paint does not flow outsied the figures. It has many, many uses. Check Google.com and look up gum arabic for lots of info. Could it be used as a binder in explosives? I have no idea.   Later,   Mickey -- Mickey E. Sadler Dublin, Ohio  
(back) Subject: Whiting and soldering From: <d.doerschuk@att.net> Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2002 16:20:44 +0000   Pieter Smit writes: > What is so special about Gum Arabic that it needs > reporting to authorities? Is there a substitute for > it that is not such a problem?   Gum arabic, or gum acacia as it is also known, has an interesting history. It has been used for 3 or 4 thousand years, and is still largely manually harvested. It's used as in inert binder in munitions, lithography, soft drinks, and organ building. Its recent history has been plagued: in the mid 1990's Osama bin Laden owned significant holdings in the production industry, and apparently at one point tried to corner the market. There was public fear that buying a diet soft drink was helping to finance terrorism. The use in munitions manufacturing is, however, the reason the ATF might pay you a friendly visit. I can see it now:   "Awright, jack, drop the 16' Bourdon and assume the position!"   Interestingly, there are substitutes but none as efficacious, or at least none that I'm aware of.   Hope this helps, and that everyone is having a good time with their projects!   Best, Dave Doerschuk