DIYAPASON-L Digest #632 - Wednesday, August 28, 2002
 
Thanks for the help
  by <lcollins@premiermeansbusiness.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Thanks for the help
  by <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Thanks for the help From: <lcollins@premiermeansbusiness.com> Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2002 17:35:30 -0500   Hi List Folk   Thanks for the help and advice with those "different" direct electric magnets. I checked Klann and kimber-Allen web pages and find some vaguely similar assemblys but not a direct replacement. After looking at them more closely, I see where they could be troublesome. Noticed some corrosion on the valve seat formed in the metal base that could be trouble and, sure enough, some of the armatures do not move as freely as they ought in their plastic bearing.I'll replace any with Reisner or Wicks as they need it.   There are two or three that have already been replaced at some time with what looks like Wicks valves. The leather/felt pad just closes on the hole in the board---they should have some type of valve seat shouldn't they ?   thanks for the help   Lloyd Collins                    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Thanks for the help From: <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2002 19:10:48 -0500   At 05:35 PM 8/28/2002 -0500, you wrote: >There are two or three that have already been replaced at some time with >what looks like Wicks valves. The leather/felt pad just closes on the = hole >in the board---they should have some type of valve seat shouldn't they ?   Hi, Lloyd!   Original Wicks valves in older chests will usually have a valve seat -- a turned wooden button sort of thing, glued to the underside of the toeboard =   around the toehole, against which the valve comes to rest. At some point, =   Wicks abandoned the usage of the valve seats, and their newer work has the =   same leather valve face seating directly against the flat underside of the =   toeboard (as, in fact, most other electric chests I've seen, and as you = are describing).   As long as the armature gap is maintained at a correct size to allow the valve to operate, either method will work equally well. (assuming that = the underside of the toehole is bored cleanly in a flat surface, of course!)   Remember that most electric pipe valve units do not have to actually open very far to allow copious wind to the toehole -- if the valve seat moves away from the toeboard - at all - when the magnet is energized, it's probably enough opening for all but the biggest toeholes. Magnets that = are gapped too widely can act strange -- sometimes slow or irregular to open, sometimes slow to close, sometimes wanting to physically bounce back and forth (note: this is not so-called "valve bounce", which is an electrical phenomonon* ). Over-wide armatures will also require more electric = current to work reliably.   Good luck, and happy valve-adjusting! <g>   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR   *many old electric-action organs with non-solid-state relay equipment may be heard to have a mild case of electrical valve bounce (the "wiccups" <lol>), if one listens closely...   PS -- additional hint: if/when you ever have an older magnet out for service, or if you replace one with another used unit, do yourself a favor =   and add a small drop of light oil to the hinge pin before putting it all back together. They often will like that.... ;-)