DIYAPASON-L Digest #707 - Friday, December 20, 2002
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  Morning routine
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Morning routine
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Morning Routine
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Regulating wind
  by "Itsnet" <rtadams@itsnet.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Regulating wind
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Regulating wind
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Books
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Books
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Regulating wind
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Regulating wind
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
Regulating wind
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Morning routine From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 01:17:25 EST     --part1_146.5a121cb.2b340ff5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   This is a crazies club, hum I like it a lot! To much fun. Dennis the menace   --part1_146.5a121cb.2b340ff5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">This is a crazies club, hum I like it a lot! To = much fun.<BR> Dennis the menace</FONT></HTML>   --part1_146.5a121cb.2b340ff5_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Morning routine From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 01:22:02 EST     --part1_137.18869e79.2b34110a_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   It ain't fair! The good stuff is never where you are! A twelve hour drive = is the minimum. Except for the Hall organ. Have fun Dennis (still Christmas shopping)!   --part1_137.18869e79.2b34110a_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">It ain't fair! The good stuff is never where you = are! A twelve hour drive is the minimum. Except for the Hall organ.<BR> Have fun Dennis (still Christmas shopping)!</FONT></HTML>   --part1_137.18869e79.2b34110a_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Morning Routine From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 00:38:54 -0600   I think one heck of a lot of it is "back east." That's the oldest part of the country, had lots of builders, and lots of established churches who bought pipe organs. I think the wide open western spaces could be the slimmest pickings of all.   And, yes, I start my day, too, with Keyboard Trader, check ebay a time or two a week, and barton theatre organs a couple of times a week, too.   Dennis Steckley    
(back) Subject: Regulating wind From: "Itsnet" <rtadams@itsnet.com> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 09:45:00 -0700   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0072_01C2A80C.76975BA0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Friends,   I am now seriously setting up my little neo-baroque organ (i.e. low wind = =3D pressure). My 8' and 4' upper wooden flue pipes sit on 5/16 in. brass =3D tubes. Since I got the organ, some little wooden chips have fallen out =3D of them , which I surmise had been intentionally inserted into the =3D bottom of these tubes to regulate their wind. Now most notes blow too =3D loud, overblow or in general seem to be getting too much air.   Any hints on re-regulating them? Popsicle sticks? Wooden dowel chips? =3D Wedged, not glued, I suppose? Machine screws into the tubes may not =3D work, at least near the tube's bottom, since the tubes have to go =3D through the really tight rack board holes. But there is a little room =3D between the wooden pipe bottom and the rack board. Some of these uppers = =3D I really need to tame down since the low end pipes speak rather softly.   Sorry to ask a real DIY organ question midst the OT chatter. Richard Adams ------=3D_NextPart_000_0072_01C2A80C.76975BA0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 6.00.2800.1106" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Friends,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I am now seriously setting up my = little =3D neo-baroque=3D20 organ (i.e. low wind pressure). My 8' and 4' upper wooden flue pipes sit = =3D on 5/16=3D20 in. brass tubes.&nbsp;Since I got the organ, some&nbsp;little wooden =3D chips have=3D20 fallen out of them , which I surmise had been =3D intentionally&nbsp;inserted into=3D20 the bottom of these tubes to regulate their wind. Now most =3D notes&nbsp;blow too=3D20 loud, overblow or in general seem to be getting too much =3D air.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Any hints on re-regulating them? =3D Popsicle sticks?=3D20 Wooden dowel chips?&nbsp;Wedged, not glued, I suppose? Machine screws =3D into the=3D20 tubes may not work, at least near the tube's bottom, since the tubes =3D have to go=3D20 through the really tight rack board holes. But&nbsp;there is a little =3D room=3D20 between the wooden pipe bottom and the rack board. Some of these =3D uppers&nbsp;I=3D20 really need to tame down since the low end pipes speak rather=3D20 softly.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Sorry to ask a real DIY organ = question =3D midst the OT=3D20 chatter.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Richard =3D Adams</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0072_01C2A80C.76975BA0--    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Regulating wind From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 12:06:30 -0500   Richard Adams <rtadams@itsnet.com> asked about regulation of pipes that have brass tubes as feet. In his book "Heimorgelbau", Karl Borman = suggests the use of brass tubing for pipe feet and discusses a means of regulation that involves soldering a brass washer onto the bottom of the foot and = then carefully reaming out the hole to get the proper regulation. While not a simple approch, it probably is pretty close to "permanent"!   The little wooden regulating wedges no doubt dried out and shrunk. = Perhaps new ones made of a non-drying/non-shrinking material would do the job. Still, anything that might fall out is certain to jam in the most inconvenient place and at the most inconvenient time! ;-)   Larry Chace        
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Regulating wind From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 12:24:59 EST   Regarding regulating wind on brass-tubed pipe feet---- A possibility is to cut a hacksaw slit into the brass pipe, and fabricate = a "wind gate" cut out of galvanized sheet that will just fit the cut in = slit, put a "L" shaped bend on the end, and insert the gate into the tube. It would give one the ability to adjust from the outside without any reaming. =   Hilgreen-Lane did this method on their larger Bourdon pipes, albeit with wooden feet. I would definitely use galvanized stock,,,as the small imperfections and *bumps* in the galvanizing would help hold the gate fast = in the slot. I suspect that one would not have to deal with the plethora of *patent police* to use this idea. Good Luck ---Roc L V Rockafellow New Jersey  
(back) Subject: Books From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 12:39:01 EST     --part1_d0.31e5ab92.2b34afb5_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,   I would like a list of the books you have found most helpful in your pipe organ building endeavors. I'm not interested in books on organ "playing" right now. I'm interested in books on the practical aspects of building = pipe organs.   I already have:   Milne, How to Build a Small Two-Manual Chamber Pipe Organ Wicks, Organbuilding for Amateurs.   I've seen (years ago): Barnes, The Contemporary American Organ Audsley, The Art of Organ Building   I've heard of: Author?, A Practical Treatise on Organ Building Author?, Heimorgelbau - the German book that has been recommended   I saw at BN.com: Jergensen?, How to Build Your Own Foot-Pumped Pipe Organ, Working Plans = for the Amateur. (of course, this one is out of print).   I've heard of several others, but i'd like to hear about which ones you've =   found practical for your projects - that have answered most of your = questions.   Thanks, Keith Zimmerman   --part1_d0.31e5ab92.2b34afb5_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>List, <BR> <BR>I would like a list of the books you have found most helpful in your = pipe organ building endeavors. &nbsp;I'm not interested in books on organ = "playing" right now. &nbsp;I'm interested in books on the practical = aspects of building pipe organs. <BR> <BR>I already have: <BR> <BR>Milne, How to Build a Small Two-Manual Chamber Pipe Organ <BR>Wicks, Organbuilding for Amateurs. <BR> <BR>I've seen (years ago): <BR>Barnes, The Contemporary American Organ <BR>Audsley, The Art of Organ Building <BR> <BR>I've heard of: <BR>Author?, A Practical Treatise on Organ Building <BR>Author?, Heimorgelbau - the German book that has been recommended <BR> <BR>I saw at BN.com: <BR>Jergensen?, How to Build Your Own Foot-Pumped Pipe Organ, Working = Plans for the Amateur. &nbsp;(of course, this one is out of print). <BR> <BR>I've heard of several others, but i'd like to hear about which ones = you've found practical for your projects - that have answered most of your = questions. <BR> <BR>Thanks, <BR>Keith Zimmerman</FONT></HTML>   --part1_d0.31e5ab92.2b34afb5_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Books From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 13:17:32 -0500   Keith Zimmerman <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> asked about books on organbuilding.   Barnes, The Contemporary American Organ, is available as a reprint by the Organ Historical Society. This book has been published since the 1930s (and has been updated). It contains quite nice drawings of windchest actions.   Audsley, The Art of Organ Building, is available as a Dover re-print. It has marvelously ponderous language and is almost 100 years old. The = action diagrams and other drawings are very fine. The tonal ideas are Audsley's own, but he certainly was a proponent of low wind pressures (and that just as pressure were starting their ascent). I've used his instructions for re-leathering a reservoir. He has very little to say about electric actions.   Karl Borman, Heimorgelbau is an amazing book, telling you how to build *everything* (except for the motor that turns the blower). He advocates wooden pipework for the at-home builder, and he is an advocate of coupler manuals. This book is out of print and is written in German using terminology that might be quite strange to a foreigner not well-versed in German woodworking vocabulary. I've built a few pipes following his instructions and they *do* work. There was a 2nd edition, and perhaps it fixes some of the errors in some tables of pipe dimensions. (In Germany, there is a group of home builders associated with the Gessellshaft der Orgelfreunde; they have carried on Karl Borman's approach to building = small "classical" instruments. These are typically mechanical action organs of = 1 to 3 manuals and up to about a dozen ranks, often all home-made of wood.)   Another approach is to find a friendly local organbuilder and helping out from time to time (if you *have* the time!). An additional source of information is the video tapes sold by the American Institute of Organbuilders (http://www.pipeorgan.org). (One of those, by Chuck Kegg, = is very informative on the subject of "electro-mechanical" actions: "Electric Chest Action: Heathen or Hero?".)   Larry Chace (sitting listening to downloaded MIDI files playing on the 1-rank Residence Pipe Organ)      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Regulating wind From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 21 Dec 2002 09:03:36 +1300   In all the wooden pipes with brass feet I've seen, the actual tip of the foot has been made of lead, thus enabling easy regulation. I don't know if you could do it, but could try soldering on little lead tips?   Ross -----Original Message----- From: Itsnet <rtadams@itsnet.com> To: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Date: Saturday, December 21, 2002 5:45 AM Subject: [Residence Organs] Regulating wind     Friends,   I am now seriously setting up my little neo-baroque organ (i.e. low wind pressure). My 8' and 4' upper wooden flue pipes sit on 5/16 in. brass = tubes. Since I got the organ, some little wooden chips have fallen out of them , which I surmise had been intentionally inserted into the bottom of these tubes to regulate their wind. Now most notes blow too loud, overblow or in general seem to be getting too much air.   Any hints on re-regulating them? Popsicle sticks? Wooden dowel chips? Wedged, not glued, I suppose? Machine screws into the tubes may not work, = at least near the tube's bottom, since the tubes have to go through the = really tight rack board holes. But there is a little room between the wooden pipe bottom and the rack board. Some of these uppers I really need to tame down since the low end pipes speak rather softly.   Sorry to ask a real DIY organ question midst the OT chatter. Richard Adams    
(back) Subject: Regulating wind From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 16:19:33 EST   Seasons Greetings everyone:   Just have a few minutes between tunings (this and Easter are my busy = times) to say that most of the old tracker pipework was regulated by putting = wooden wedges into the pipe feet to meter the wind going into the pipe. Open toe =   voicing is the other method but it involves working the mouth on metal = pipes and does not apply well to wooden pipes. The wedges are installed and = held with friction. As time goes by they do tend to fall out. The pipe which = is really voiced on a lower pressure than the chest pressure so it then does overblow or get too loud for decent regulation. I too read the part Larry =   Chace mentioned about washers installed in brass pipe feet. I take them = out because many start to whistle like a rubber ducky toy. Instead I prefered = to install a wooden dowel to fit the same internal diameter as the brass = tube. It will have a hole drilled through it and can be reamed out until the = pipe is loud enough without overblowing. A felt washer on the topside of the dowel will keep it from whistling and reduce turbulence after the dowel. = The later pipework which would be considered modern involves gates for the = large wood flues that are fitted to each pipe foot and the lead toes on pipe = feet are the greatest thing since sliced bread. You can cone them down if too open or ream them out if too closed. Regulating the wind to a pipe is an = art in itself and the better methods of control are so much better than = sticking wedges into the feet. I could also cut little discs of the correct brass tubing diameter, drill a holes in opposite walls of the brass tube, and soldering the disc to a brass rod that can turn to operate the valve structure. Then all you have to do is put a bend for a handle in the = brass rod and adjust away! A drop of superglue will keep the butterfly valve = set where you left it.   Best wishes to everyone,   Al Sefl  
(back) Subject: Regulating wind From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2002 20:31:27 -0600   TheGluePot@aol.com wrote: <snip> most of the old tracker pipework was regulated by putting wooden > wedges into the pipe feet to meter the wind going into the pipe.   <snip>   > The wedges are installed and held with friction. As time goes by they = do tend to fall out.   We have found that the "neatest" way to regulate wooden pipes is to remove all of the old wood plugging material and CAREFULLY drill holes into the pipe foot laterally, as close to the underside of the pipe as possible. We then insert VERY large-diameter "Grub Screws" (the kind used as set screws for securing pulleys onto shafts in Industrial Applications. The OD of these screws is the same diameter as the ID of the windway of the pipe foot.   > Regulating the wind to a pipe is an art in itself and the better > = methods of control are so much better than sticking > wedges into the feet.   Yup, which is why we went to this method! These allow one to simply regulate the pipe in situ with the turn of a screwdriver or Hex Key.   Very neat, simple and convenient.   And I'd like to wish Merry Christmas to everyone also.   Faithfully,   G.A.   -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL mailto:arp@starband.net SHOP SATELLITE EMAIL mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME OFFICE EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL