DIYAPASON-L Digest #511 - Saturday, February 2, 2002
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Buying a Church
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Buying a re-cycled Church
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Buying a Church (somewhat in depth)
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: Allen reverb
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Allen reverb
  by "F. Richard Burt" <dorian.organs@verizon.net>
Reverberation - a new twist
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Adaptive re-use of Churches and other structures
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Allen reverb
  by <Wdh2@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Speaking of allen reverbs
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Allen reverb reminiscences
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Reverberation - a new twist
  by "Jon" <sparky@CEINetworks.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  reverberation
  by "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu>
RE: [Residence Organs]  reverberation
  by "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu>
Speaking of reverberation in new home construction check this out
  by "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca>
Re: [Residence Organs]  reverberation
  by "Jon" <sparky@CEINetworks.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Buying a Church From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 01:08:10 EST   My wife found several vacant churches for sale on the Internet. Not to = pricey either.   Have a nice week end. Dennis  
(back) Subject: Buying a re-cycled Church From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 00:17:16 -0600   Pipewheezr@aol.com wrote: > My wife found several vacant churches for sale on the Internet. Not to = pricey > either.   Where??   Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Buying a Church (somewhat in depth) From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 02:00:39 EST   Hey list---- Having been involved for a number of months in looking at vacant churches in the New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania area and finally = getting involved with a friend in a purchase--heres the first pitfall to look out = for and think about. ---- Its been my findings that commercial/residential mortgage outfits = want NOTHING to do with an "ole" church, I perceive the general feeling is that =   its so wierd that the liklihood of the person ever getting it finished is unlikely,,,so go looking with a big pocket full of cash. Perhaps the dissolving/merging church will carry the mortgage for you,,but my = experience was that they were just trying to get as much money as they could out of = the "for sale" structure and running to the "tilt up" builder as quickly as possible to get started on the "new" one. Next hurdle,,,at least in this area,,,is taxes. Active churches are = not taxed, however they are appraised for the worth of the building(s) and = land. That all immediately changes soon as you--the individual--purchases. Then = its your tax burden,,,,and needs re-assessment immediately to hopefully what = you paid for the structure/land, assuming it was reasonable. There are other pitfalls to look out for,,,but thats another story = for another time. But the idea is great and having assessed the sanctuary its more than likely gonna sound GREAT!!! get the pipe organ up and running first,,,,THEN worry about the living amenities,,,right?? Regards to all--- ---Roc L V Rockafellow Niew Joisey    
(back) Subject: Re: Allen reverb From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 09:49:15 EST   Hi group:   I am sure there are better systems than the Allen, even the newest ones. = I attended a Diane Bish dedication recital on a hybrid Schantz = (reconditioned from the 1950's) and Allen (four manual Renaisannce). The = Schantz was in chambers rather than a case and the Allen evidently cost a = good bit and I couldn't for the life of me understand not just spending = that money on more stops for the Schantz or revoicing it or getting it out = of the chambers. It was not easy to tell that the digital voices were = digital, and the reverb was rather fakey. I did not see a lot of speaker = units, and I'm sure that a more sophisticated processor and multiple = speaker units would help.   At our present state of the art, maybe digital pedal stops (16 and 32), = but God and St. Arp save us from these other "improvements." Ms. Bish = defines prostituting her art, I think.   Regards, Roy Kersey  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Allen reverb From: "F. Richard Burt" <dorian.organs@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 10:21:53 -0600   Jess4203@aol.com wrote: > > Hi group: > > I am sure there are better systems than the Allen, even the > newest ones. I attended a Diane Bish dedication recital on > a hybrid Schantz (reconditioned from the 1950's) and Allen > (four manual Renaisannce)..... * * *   > At our present state of the art, maybe digital pedal stops > (16 and 32), but God and St. Arp save us from these other > "improvements." Ms. Bish defines prostituting her art, > I think. Easy... especially on the personal attacks. This all part of the evolutionary process. The problem is not based solely on adding digital stuff to a pipe organ. It is an integral part of the larger task of learning in the only proven valid laboratory; that of an installed organ that we can hear over an extended period of time. Ron, the digital technologies are fairly mature now. They will continue to improve in audible ways as we learn how to use them properly. Maybe the emphasis should be on the "properly." Some of us are having relatively good success with digital augmentation. However, I believe that it extremely important to have the project under control of a person who completely understands the pipe-side of the equation. I know people who can do this work. They are not cheap, but respect the time-honored pipe traditions and do everything in their power to make the digital voices behave as wind blown pipe-type sound and blend with the "real" pipes. This ability always seems to impress the masters of imitation organ building. So, I ask what's missing when the fellows who build and augment pipe organs with digital systems and voices do not properly understand what they were building in the first place? Evolutionary development in the technology and market forces will hone a keener edge to their ears and understandings in the future. Watch and see. It will all continue to improve. If you listened to the Schantz/Allen combo and were having even a little bit of difficulty discerning which stops were wind blown and which were digital, that indicates some of the maturity of which I speak. Properly regulating the digital voices to the rest of the pipes is one of the most critical parts of the tonal finishing job. There is still a bit of tension between the wind-blown camp and the digital camp to find people who are open-minded enough to do this and do it well. I do not understand why reverb was added to the organ. I cannot fathom that addition. You mentioned not understanding why they didn't just add more stops. The answer to that might simply be the enormous increase in the cost of stop additions. The cost of pipe additions (in 2000) probably far exceeded the original cost (ca. 1950s) of the organ and emotional rejection of the sticker price was a real issue for the church. I cast my vote with you. When we added seven digital stops to complete the "prepared for" stops left vacant by Schantz when they installed our organ in 1979, no reverb was even considered. All pipes and digital stops play into the same acoustical environment equally. So, the potential problem of identifying the "artificial" reverb sound was precluded. As for identifying the digital stops aurally, we recently had a visiting organist from Germany play a recital. When he heard me tell him that seven of the stops were digital, he said, "I didn't hear any imitation organ stops. They are very good to get past me." The only functional problem that I have seen so far is the organist did not quickly adapt to the "tune" function on the organ. Just last week (she has had this tuning function operable for more than a year) she excalimed quite enthusiastically that she tuned the digitals to the pipes, "...and you know what? It works." <grins> Some pipe traditions change slowly, ...as exhibited by her slowness to accept the digital tuning function. While it seems intuitively obvious to me, she had been trained and practiced for the past 25 years to simply ignore stops that were out of tune, for they would be corrected on the next tuning by the organ tech. Today, she is has a different attitude about those "out of tune" digital stops. Yes, I know there are some technologies with automatic tuning sensors, but this is not one of them. Let's not attack chasms which are too wide to jump right now. I believe that, in due time, we will also have an automatic tuning adjustment feature in the software. But that is for another day. Stay in touch. F. Richard Bur ..  
(back) Subject: Reverberation - a new twist From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 12:41:15 EST     --part1_72.16fc37e3.298d7ebb_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Greetings,   Regarding the reverberation issue (Walker Organ & Allen Organ companies = take note), at the following website a compnay has developed the technology to ELIMINATE reverberation in large buildings.   http://www.nctclearspeech.com/   Perhaps they could also help do the reverse, namely, add reverberation to = a room.   Musically, Stan Krider   In a message dated 02/01/2002 12:39:22 AM Eastern Standard Time, Ross = Wards writes:   (Most of text deleted)   > The organ room itself is about 45ft long and 25ft wide, with the roof = ridge > lengthwise. Wall height is about 8ft at the eaves, about 13ft in the = down > the ridge. The organ will be taking up a space about 20ft wide by 18ft > deep. > Looking forward to some utterly brilliant, wonderful, expert knowledge = that > can be understood by someone who loves sound and has a keen ear but = knows > nothing of electronics. > > > >     --part1_72.16fc37e3.298d7ebb_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Greetings,<BR> <BR> Regarding the reverberation issue (Walker Organ &amp; Allen Organ = companies take note), at the following website a compnay has developed the = technology to ELIMINATE reverberation in large buildings. <BR> <BR> http://www.nctclearspeech.com/<BR> <BR> Perhaps they could also help do the reverse, namely, add reverberation to = a room. <BR> <BR> Musically,<BR> Stan Krider<BR> <BR> In a message dated 02/01/2002 12:39:22 AM Eastern Standard Time, Ross = Wards writes:<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">(Most of text = deleted)</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: = #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" = SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The organ room = itself is about 45ft long and 25ft wide, with the roof ridge<BR> lengthwise. Wall height is about 8ft at the eaves, about 13ft in the = down<BR> the ridge. The organ will be taking up a space about 20ft wide by 18ft = deep.<BR> Looking forward to some utterly brilliant, wonderful, expert knowledge = that<BR> can be understood by someone who loves sound and has a keen ear but = knows<BR> nothing of electronics.<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR> <BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_72.16fc37e3.298d7ebb_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Adaptive re-use of Churches and other structures From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 14:18:15 -0600   Jess4203@aol.com wrote: > Hi group: > I am glad Randy spoke up, I had heard of his project thru a mutual = friend, it's an interesting idea. I have a friend, Bradley Rule, an = organbuilder in Jefferson City, Tennessee who has his workshop in an old = church <snip>   Another organbuilder, Michael Bigelow, who is located in American Fork, UT, uses an old LDS Stake Center (turn-of-the-century-building) as his combination shop/residence. It's a "U"-shaped building with a second floor (I believe, I never saw this portion of the structure when I was there 10 years ago!) and they have the shop on one "leg" of the "U", while the erecting area/storage is in the former Chapel area on opposite "leg" of the "U".   Some on this list know of our adaptive re-use of a turn-of-the-century 2-story brick opera house for our shop space. Of course, it was already this way when we bought it 22 years ago from another organbuilder who retired.   Of course, never being content with far to much to handle as it is, I keep lusting for the old abandoned high school building on the south end of town, imagining what kind of "killer" Concert Hall/Erecting Room the old Gym would make.   Faithfully,   Grandpa Arp (who keeps his eyes peeled for someone with deep pockets and similar aspirations. . .)   Faithfully,   Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Allen reverb From: <Wdh2@aol.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 16:00:54 EST   Greetings Everyone, The point of adding "artificial reverb" to help the sound of an organ is =   far from a new thing, particularly in Washington, DC where this system was =   installed many years ago. Some on this list will be old enough to remember =   the Schober Electronic Organ Kit Company. They sold electronic organs in = kit form which one was supposed to assemble at home. One accessory offered, = was a device with a continuous audio tape loop winding over one record head and several playback heads. I cant say for fact, but a system of this similar description was installed at St. John's Episcopal Church (Lafayette = Square) shortly after the 3mnl 62 rank Gress-Miles was installed (appx '69 ). In = this case, several microphones were suspended at the front of the pipe chambers =   and were then connected to the "reverb" device which was connected to an amplifier and loudspeakers placed in the sanctuary. The explanation I got = for this was that the acoustics in St. John's were DREADFUL, the room was dead = as a doornail and this was albeit a crude attempt to help the organ a little. =   Unfortunately, those same mics were not extended to the room, and when the =   congregation would sing, and this reverb device was employed, when the singing stopped, the voices died immediately, while the organ "rolled on = in it's assisted glory." I strongly doubt this device remains in use today, = as the advances in technology have given audio engineers the ability to re-create the acoustical properties of a desired space by "sampling" the space with microphones and using a microprocessor to treat the audio it processes and give the aural impression of a room far different from your own. As for electronic augmentation of pipe organs, I have seen excellent examples of digital voices added where pipe ranks would not fit (example Crystal Cathedral Garden Grove Cal). Digital voices used to displace problematic sounds (i.e., chimes and other tuned percussions that would = not stay in tune) or in the Cathedral of the Incarnation in Baltimore (3mnl Rodgers 960 and 20+ ranks of White-Legg Moller) where design and = installation errors resulted in an instrument that required almost total dismantling to =   get to buried chests when service was required). Finally, as for Diane Bish, I applaud her ability to wake up every = morning and to know that she can make a living playing music, whether on "real = pipe organs" or electronic instruments. Personally, I must engage in other pursuits to keep a roof over my head, and my mortgage company doesn't care = a tinker's damn whether I have pipes at my church or not. I suspect Ms. = Bish's creditors don't, either.   Warren D. Hood, II  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Speaking of allen reverbs From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 16:24:26 -0500     The old Allen in my old church had a little box in it for the reverb who's ID plate said something like "built by lovely ladies in Menomonee Wisconsin" or something to that effect.  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Allen reverb reminiscences From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 16:37:41 EST   Hi Listers---- I well remember the Schober Reverb-a-tape machine. At the time (mid-60's) it seemed to do a better job than the Fisher Space-expander (necklace springs), which seemed to be the only 2 devices on the market, besides the Hammond method of springs in damping fluid. However,,,,one wanted to have several extra tape loops made up ahead of time before = playing an entire evening, the tape loops seemed to have a pretty short life. At the time,,,my friend Jeff Barker was playing his Allen Theatre = Deluxe in one of the clubs on Long Beach Island (organ island) and he had = equipped the Allen with the Schober reverb-a-tape. One evening Jeff was surprised = to find several engineers and technicians from the Allen Organ Co. in the audience and at a break they were most interested in the Schober unit. No reverb of any sort was offered on an Allen of the day, it seems that = Jerome Markowitz had decreed that "if you want reverb, put my instrument in a = room big enough to give it". Looking back on those days,,both in tone generation and = reverb,,,,,,we have come a long way,,,and I suspect, a long way to go yet... Cheers to all--- ---Roc L V Rockafellow Niew Joisey  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Reverberation - a new twist From: "Jon" <sparky@CEINetworks.com> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 17:16:11 -0500   > This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --B_3095514972_35952 Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   Considering that a number of Walker hybrids are voiced by Bob Walker with the specific task of making them sound like they are part of the organ, I would be surprised to find someone who can honestly say the Walker side =3DB3didn=3DB9t fit=3DB2 the pipe side.   And as for... > At our present state of the art, maybe digital pedal stops > (16 and 32), but God and St. Arp save us from these other > "improvements." Ms. Bish defines prostituting her art, > I think.   I can only assume that you haven=3DB9t heard properly installed Walker = stuff. Their sounds are to the point that they are often of higher quality sound than the pipes that they have been installed next to.   ~j   On 2/2/02 12:41 PM, "Wuxuzusu@aol.com" <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> wrote:   > Regarding the reverberation issue (Walker Organ & Allen Organ companies = t=3D ake > note), at the following website a compnay has developed the technology = to > ELIMINATE reverberation in large buildings. >=3D20 > http://www.nctclearspeech.com/ >=3D20 > Perhaps they could also help do the reverse, namely, add reverberation = to=3D a > room.=3D20 >=3D20 > Musically, > Stan Krider >=3D20 > In a message dated 02/01/2002 12:39:22 AM Eastern Standard Time, Ross = War=3D ds > writes: >=3D20 > (Most of text deleted) >=3D20 >> The organ room itself is about 45ft long and 25ft wide, with the roof = ri=3D dge >> lengthwise. Wall height is about 8ft at the eaves, about 13ft in the = dow=3D n >> the ridge. The organ will be taking up a space about 20ft wide by 18ft = d=3D eep. >> Looking forward to some utterly brilliant, wonderful, expert knowledge = t=3D hat >> can be understood by someone who loves sound and has a keen ear but = know=3D s >> nothing of electronics. >>=3D20 >>=3D20 >>=3D20 >>=3D20 >>=3D20 >>=3D20 >>=3D20     --B_3095514972_35952 Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: [Residence Organs] &nbsp;Reverberation - a new twist</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D3D"Verdana">Considering that a number of Walker hybrids are = voiced=3D by Bob Walker with the specific task of making them sound like they are = par=3D t of the organ, I would be surprised to find someone who can honestly say = th=3D e Walker side &#8220;didn&#8217;t fit&#8221; the pipe side.<BR> <BR> And as for...<BR> </FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"Monaco"><TT>&gt; At our present state of the art, = maybe =3D digital pedal stops <BR> &gt; (16 and 32), but God and St. Arp save us from these other <BR> &gt; &quot;improvements.&quot; &nbsp;Ms. Bish defines prostituting her = art,=3D <BR> &gt; I think.<BR> <BR> </TT></FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"Verdana">I can only assume that you = haven&#8217;t h=3D eard properly installed Walker stuff. &nbsp;Their sounds are to the point = th=3D at they are often of higher quality sound than the pipes that they have = been=3D installed next to.<BR> <BR> </FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"Monaco"><TT>~j<BR> </TT></FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"Verdana"><BR> On 2/2/02 12:41 PM, &quot;Wuxuzusu@aol.com&quot; &lt;Wuxuzusu@aol.com&gt; = w=3D rote:<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Verdana"><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2">Regarding = the reverb=3D eration issue (Walker Organ &amp; Allen Organ companies take note), at the = f=3D ollowing website a compnay has developed the technology to ELIMINATE = reverbe=3D ration in large buildings. <BR> <BR> <FONT COLOR=3D3D"#0000FF"><U>http://www.nctclearspeech.com/<BR> </U></FONT><BR> Perhaps they could also help do the reverse, namely, add reverberation to = a=3D room. <BR> <BR> Musically,<BR> Stan Krider<BR> <BR> In a message dated 02/01/2002 12:39:22 AM Eastern Standard Time, Ross = Wards=3D writes:<BR> </FONT></FONT><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial"><BR> (Most of text deleted)<BR> <BR> </FONT></FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT SIZE=3D3D"2"><FONT FACE=3D3D"Arial">The = organ room =3D itself is about 45ft long and 25ft wide, with the roof ridge<BR> lengthwise. Wall height is about 8ft at the eaves, about 13ft in the = down<B=3D R> the ridge. The organ will be taking up a space about 20ft wide by 18ft = deep=3D ..<BR> Looking forward to some utterly brilliant, wonderful, expert knowledge = that=3D <BR> can be understood by someone who loves sound and has a keen ear but = knows<B=3D R> nothing of electronics.<BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR> </FONT></FONT><FONT FACE=3D3D"Verdana"><BR> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D3D"Verdana"><BR> </FONT> </BODY> </HTML>     --B_3095514972_35952--    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] reverberation From: "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 18:46:24 -0500   At 11:23 PM 2/1/2002 -0500, you wrote: >Hey Eric, > >Try creating a separate "reverb" channel. Using a network of resistors, = sum >the inputs of all your amps to one signal. Take that into your reverb = unit >and run its output (mono or stereo your choice) to a power amp with = separate >speakers. This way your "audio system" on the organ doesn't get hampered = up >with trying to reproduce the reverb (this is one of the numerous flaws in >the allen (reverb system)).   That would have been my next approach had I not chosen to go pipes = instead, as I just wasn't happy with the digital sound.   Thanks, Eric    
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] reverberation From: "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 18:57:59 -0500   At 05:43 PM 2/1/2002 -0500, Frank wrote: >Hi everyone. > >I have a couple of thoughts that might be of interest to the use of = reverb >in small spaces. This would be an entirely different approach, BTW, than >Kurt's >suggestion of completely deadening the room and applying only = electronically >generated reverb. Actually, it's nearly a complete opposite! Erhm. >   Sounds like a good idea. I really hate the thought of making my organ room =   as dead as possible just to try and use artificial reverb. At this point I'm trying to make it as live as possible in hopes I'll be satisfied with it that way. This way if I want some real life I have it when the artificial unit is turned off. Just speaking in a room with some real reverb. makes it feel much bigger already. As it is I doubt I would be satisfied with artificial reverb. over the long haul being the purist that =   I am. But I still would like to experiment some with it.   Eric      
(back) Subject: Speaking of reverberation in new home construction check this out From: "Daniel Hopkins" <danielwh1@ns.sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 22:09:39 -0400   When all of us are trying to liven up the acoustics . this particular = sound engineer is trying to do the opposite for a music room of a persons = house on PBS this old house. they are using all kinds of sound absorbing = material for this persons Music room Check this out!!!! http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/thisoldhouse/projects/manchester/features/feature16= .html      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] reverberation From: "Jon" <sparky@CEINetworks.com> Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 21:57:21 -0500   Well, eventually the toast gets burned :-)   You had an Allen MDS so you were subject to the incredible 1-sample-per-rank-allen-syndrome.... Of course I don=B9t know this for fact, but the chiff, wind noise, and all that stuff just oscillates faster as you scale up ... Talk about fake sounding, no wonder you were displeased... Of course Redundance (errr Renaissance) is no better... Although the festival trumpet of the better models is a killer between like C2 and C4 ... Its quite nice (although you cant use any other choir stops at the time)... But in typical allen fashion, solo stops are OK.. Ensemble is garbage. Hasn't improved since day 1...   ~jon   On 2/2/02 6:46 PM, "Eric Sagmuller" <ess4@psu.edu> wrote:   > At 11:23 PM 2/1/2002 -0500, you wrote: >> Hey Eric, >>=20 >> Try creating a separate "reverb" channel. Using a network of resistors,= sum >> the inputs of all your amps to one signal. Take that into your reverb u= nit >> and run its output (mono or stereo your choice) to a power amp with sepa= rate >> speakers. This way your "audio system" on the organ doesn't get hampere= d up >> with trying to reproduce the reverb (this is one of the numerous flaws i= n >> the allen (reverb system)). >=20 > That would have been my next approach had I not chosen to go pipes instea= d, > as I just wasn't happy with the digital sound. >=20 > Thanks, > Eric >=20 >=20 > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >=20 >=20