DIYAPASON-L Digest #520 - Sunday, February 17, 2002
 
Re: Winding magnets
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
Re: Winding magnets
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
Re: Winding magnets
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  making DE valves
  by "Gregory Rister" <grandcornet@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Winding magnets From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2002 18:41:32 EST   Hi Christopher and all:   I have no experience with winding magnets myself, but I believe there is a = German book on House Organs which gives instructions on how to do it. The = Germans seem to have a tradition of building the whole organ from scratch = which dates from Borman's book and the Hausorgel chapter of the GDO, which = publishes several publications each year. I haven't yet joined because = it's all in German. The book I'm speaking of is not Borman's, but a later = book on House Organs which features direct electric action (Borman's = advocates tracker action). Both books, from reports of them, give = complete instructions on building everything, including the blower, from = scratch. If I can find the citation somewhere, I'll send it along. = Probably someone in the GDO could easily give it to you if you emailed an = officer from their website . . . the other option would be to try to find = some used magnets, which should be less than half of new, if they can be = found.   As far as I can tell, there are organ builders who merely assemble organs = from parts bought at supply houses, there are some who make most of their = consoles, cases and actions and buy only pipes, and there are builders, = such as Fritts, Brombaugh, Richards and Fowkes, etc., who make most = everything in house. The level of scholarship of the best American = builders is high, from what I can see. Paul Fritts' organ built for Jeff = Smith, the Frugal Gourmet, is basically a homage to the Compenius Organ at = Buckeborge, all the pipes are of wood save for the Cornet. I gather that = Mr. Fritts did some research on the pipe scales of this instrument before = starting. There is a companion, similar instrument at one of the = California Universities, too. Richards and Fowkes have published a = comparison of various tin-lead alloys from different Baroque organs = (Schnitger and others) along with the assay of their own high and low tin = recipes. The Dobson Organ at Holy Cross University Chapel is a copy of   I can't say that I want to build an entire organ from scratch for = starters. I do dream that I will live long enough to build a tracker and = even cast some of my own pipes, but I think that is years into the future = right now. I realized that I need 36 Stopped wood pipes to complete my 97 = pipe Bourdon rank (16-8-4-2), so I was thinking of building those pipes, = maybe breaking to open wood where I start (the last stopped pipe I have is = three inches long). Any comments on this idea or on what the scaling = should be? Should I stay with the current halving ratio or get wider as I = ascend?   Best Regards, Roy Kersey  
(back) Subject: Re: Winding magnets From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2002 18:41:39 EST   Hi Christopher and all:   I have no experience with winding magnets myself, but I believe there is a = German book on House Organs which gives instructions on how to do it. The = Germans seem to have a tradition of building the whole organ from scratch = which dates from Borman's book and the Hausorgel chapter of the GDO, which = publishes several publications each year. I haven't yet joined because = it's all in German. The book I'm speaking of is not Borman's, but a later = book on House Organs which features direct electric action (Borman's = advocates tracker action). Both books, from reports of them, give = complete instructions on building everything, including the blower, from = scratch. If I can find the citation somewhere, I'll send it along. = Probably someone in the GDO could easily give it to you if you emailed an = officer from their website . . . the other option would be to try to find = some used magnets, which should be less than half of new, if they can be = found.   As far as I can tell, there are organ builders who merely assemble organs = from parts bought at supply houses, there are some who make most of their = consoles, cases and actions and buy only pipes, and there are builders, = such as Fritts, Brombaugh, Richards and Fowkes, etc., who make most = everything in house. The level of scholarship of the best American = builders is high, from what I can see. Paul Fritts' organ built for Jeff = Smith, the Frugal Gourmet, is basically a homage to the Compenius Organ at = Buckeborge, all the pipes are of wood save for the Cornet. I gather that = Mr. Fritts did some research on the pipe scales of this instrument before = starting. There is a companion, similar instrument at one of the = California Universities, too. Richards and Fowkes have published a = comparison of various tin-lead alloys from different Baroque organs = (Schnitger and others) along with the assay of their own high and low tin = recipes. The Dobson Organ at Holy Cross University Chapel is a copy of   I can't say that I want to build an entire organ from scratch for = starters. I do dream that I will live long enough to build a tracker and = even cast some of my own pipes, but I think that is years into the future = right now. I realized that I need 36 Stopped wood pipes to complete my 97 = pipe Bourdon rank (16-8-4-2), so I was thinking of building those pipes, = maybe breaking to open wood where I start (the last stopped pipe I have is = three inches long). Any comments on this idea or on what the scaling = should be? Should I stay with the current halving ratio or get wider as I = ascend?   Best Regards, Roy Kersey  
(back) Subject: Re: Winding magnets From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2002 18:41:36 EST   Hi Christopher and all:   I have no experience with winding magnets myself, but I believe there is a = German book on House Organs which gives instructions on how to do it. The = Germans seem to have a tradition of building the whole organ from scratch = which dates from Borman's book and the Hausorgel chapter of the GDO, which = publishes several publications each year. I haven't yet joined because = it's all in German. The book I'm speaking of is not Borman's, but a later = book on House Organs which features direct electric action (Borman's = advocates tracker action). Both books, from reports of them, give = complete instructions on building everything, including the blower, from = scratch. If I can find the citation somewhere, I'll send it along. = Probably someone in the GDO could easily give it to you if you emailed an = officer from their website . . . the other option would be to try to find = some used magnets, which should be less than half of new, if they can be = found.   As far as I can tell, there are organ builders who merely assemble organs = from parts bought at supply houses, there are some who make most of their = consoles, cases and actions and buy only pipes, and there are builders, = such as Fritts, Brombaugh, Richards and Fowkes, etc., who make most = everything in house. The level of scholarship of the best American = builders is high, from what I can see. Paul Fritts' organ built for Jeff = Smith, the Frugal Gourmet, is basically a homage to the Compenius Organ at = Buckeborge, all the pipes are of wood save for the Cornet. I gather that = Mr. Fritts did some research on the pipe scales of this instrument before = starting. There is a companion, similar instrument at one of the = California Universities, too. Richards and Fowkes have published a = comparison of various tin-lead alloys from different Baroque organs = (Schnitger and others) along with the assay of their own high and low tin = recipes. The Dobson Organ at Holy Cross University Chapel is a copy of   I can't say that I want to build an entire organ from scratch for = starters. I do dream that I will live long enough to build a tracker and = even cast some of my own pipes, but I think that is years into the future = right now. I realized that I need 36 Stopped wood pipes to complete my 97 = pipe Bourdon rank (16-8-4-2), so I was thinking of building those pipes, = maybe breaking to open wood where I start (the last stopped pipe I have is = three inches long). Any comments on this idea or on what the scaling = should be? Should I stay with the current halving ratio or get wider as I = ascend?   Best Regards, Roy Kersey  
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] making DE valves From: "Gregory Rister" <grandcornet@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2002 16:21:20 -0800   Hi Chris,   You're a brave man; I'd go stark, staring mad if I had to wind magnets all day!   One source you might consider for magnets is used electric chestwork. I have found that frequently this stuff makes it into the used component market, having been cobbled together by amateur organ builders out of electro-pneumatic or other varieties of chestwork. The resale value is usually rather low in comparison to supply house electric chestwork, sometimes with very good reason. I came across some rather horrific examples of such chestwork some time ago, which I picked up very cheaply. They were perhaps the worst-made/modified windchests I'd ever seen, but they yielded about 600 Justin Matters magnets. The woodwork (what was = left of it) kept me quite warm in the winter :)   As for the current state of organbuilding, I think that the industry has gone in large part toward the sort of specialization you find in other professions. You get your pipes from one source, chestwork from another, console from yet another. I myself don't see a great deal of difference between specifying scales, materials and construction details to a pipemaker in Ohio, and doing the stuff in-house, except for the vast overhead you acquire in doing it in-house.   There are still many, many shops that build organs virtually entirely in house, both factory operations and small boutique outfits. On the other hand, depending upon what sort of work you're doing, it is very = convenient, quick and efficient to get some components from an outside source.   We build our own chestwork (mostly electric), but our shop isn't set up = for cabinetry work or finishing, so we will usually order a console shell, and then outfit it ourselves (once again with mostly supply-house components). =   But then, we do quite a bit of rebuild work but no new organs to-date. There really isn't as much money in that, anyway! :)   Greg Rister Pipe Organ Craftsmen Pomona, California     > [Original Message] > From: Christopher Sabatowich <c.sabatowich@sthedwigchurch.zzn.com> > To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org>; <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> > Date: 02/16/2002 7:49:11 PM > Subject: [Residence Organs] making DE valves >   > Anyone willing to share their success and horror stories with making magnets?   > Do many of today's organ builders predominantly put together parts > ordered from a supply house according to their own designs, or do they build > a lot of the organ from raw materials (e.g. ingots or sheets of metal = for > making pipes)?