DIYAPASON-L Digest #482 - Friday, January 4, 2002
 
Re: Changing Bourdon Cutups
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
appearance vs. function & price
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Fake Mixture question
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: Changing Bourdon Cutups
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Power consumption
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
e-mail address change
  by "Carl and Halie Dodrill" <dodrill@accessone.com>
Wind conductors
  by "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@sockets.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wind conductors
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Changing Bourdon Cutups From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 02:01:32 EST     --part1_30.201484cd.2966ad4c_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   hi group:   Well, my catty remarks resurrected don't look any better than a temporary repair. I do think that various people will have various standards for = the look of their experiments/restorations and I would plead for "vive la difference" depending on need/preference. I also have to confess to = having pushed on a few lips in the last few days in a completely reversible and successful voicing manuever. I just can't seem to keep my hands off those =   husky pipes. I do have another question: my Bourdons sound OK when winded = by the hair dryer one-by-one at present. What would I be likely to = accomplish by using lead/spotted metal/carefully crafted wood to change the cutup to something lower?   TIA, Roy Kersey   --part1_30.201484cd.2966ad4c_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>hi group: <BR> <BR>Well, my catty remarks resurrected don't look any better than a = temporary repair. &nbsp;I do think that various people will have various = standards for the look of their experiments/restorations and I would plead = for "vive la difference" depending on need/preference. &nbsp;I also have = to confess to having pushed on a few lips in the last few days in a = completely reversible and successful voicing manuever. &nbsp;I just can't = seem to keep my hands off those husky pipes. &nbsp;I do have another = question: my Bourdons sound OK when winded by the hair dryer one-by-one at = present. &nbsp;What would I be likely to accomplish by using lead/spotted = metal/carefully crafted wood to change the cutup to something lower? <BR> <BR>TIA, <BR>Roy Kersey</FONT></HTML>   --part1_30.201484cd.2966ad4c_boundary--  
(back) Subject: appearance vs. function & price From: "Randy Terry" <randyterryus@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 06:26:22 -0800 (PST)     Hello all, I'll break my usual silence here to state just a few personal = observations:   When one has a house organ, it is just that. A house organ is normally an = instrument that grows, shrinks, evolves, changes. There are many truly fine examples of house = organs built by professional firms or professional quality amateurs that exhibit the = finest craftsmanship down to the last detail.   There are many more though, that are assemblages of parts from here and = there and often those parts are truly junk that has been rescued, literally, from the dumpster. = The last organ I "assembled," came about simply because I had collected enough stuff to put = one together. I had a lovely Pilcher console shell that the insides were a total loss due to its = being in a barn for 20 years to which I put in a set of Klann manuals (great and choir from a 3 = manual set, which gave me 9 stops on the top and 6 on the bottom) and the pedals and their switches = from the same organ. The two chests a 4 rank and 3 rank were from a Skinner that had been butchered = unfortunately, and replaced by a Reuter at my home church. I was able to rig the rockers from = the Pilcher using radio shack parts. It looked pretty good and it worked.   The pipes came from various sources: A 1946 Moller that my church = purchased to expand its 1979 Moller and which were totally redundant: The Gedeckt, and a Gamba. Other = pipes included an old wood Harmonic Flute, a 1920's Moller Vox Humana, a Casavant Aeoline from = the Park Avenue Temple in NYC (I was told) and a 2' Principal which was part of a very old Cornet = Mixture. No 16' Pedal or fancy stuff.   The Gedeckt got its nicks filled with wax, the Harmonic Flute got several = missing pipes replaced with metal ones whose sound matched, the Gamba was resacled to be a light = Geigen starting at 4' C, and all the basses came from the Gedeckt bass or Haskell Aeoline bass.   I had some beautiful facade basses from another church which the larger = piece made a grand headboard to a king size bed, and the smaller fronted out the lower = section of the organ.   All said and done, the instrument was too loud to play in full ensemble, = but I had lovely flutes, and nice colorful 8/4 sounds in a variety of colors, and the 4' wood flute = at 2' pitch gave me a "chorus." It was a great practice organ and was far more colorful than the = small Wicks or Schlickers I found in most practice rooms. However, while tuning collars = covered my hacksaw work (on the Gamba) and my crude cut-up work was masked by the front pipes, I = had achieved nice sounds that could not be faulted, and was happy.   The cost, a few hundred bucks for wood framing and PVC and some minor = electrical supplies. The inside of the console was a spider's nest of wires, as I did not know how = to do such work neatly. I learned a lot about appreciating old pipes and parts, and I learned a = lot of what not to do if there is ever a next time, but I am proud that all that stuff save for = possibly the Aeoline and casework did not end up in the dump.   I think depending on the individual's goal, it is up to them what and how = to do their projects at home. I always knew that such a project would be totally inappropriate for = a church that would have to deal with constant adjustments etc., but for home it was fine. If = I had money I would have had one built!!   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Randy Terry, Director of Music Ministry & Organist Mona Dena, Assistant & Principal Conductor The Episcopal Church of St. Peter 178 Clinton Street Redwood City, California www.stpetersrwc.org   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Send your FREE holiday greetings online! http://greetings.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Fake Mixture question From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 09:43:50 -0500   "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com> asked about fake mixtures. = One approach is the one taken by organbuilder Chuck Kegg for small unified organs. As I understand it (and I may have some detail wrong), he = provides a short-compass quint rank, tuned as a quint, and then borrows the unison ranks from appropriate places. He used wiring in the relay to provide one or two breaks, so that the "mixture" behaves more like a real mixture.   Another approach was suggested to me in 1997 by Dave McNally of Rhode Island (does anyone have a current e-mail address for him?). He recommended an unenclosed Great division consisting of 3 straight ranks: Diapason 8', Octave 4', and Gamba 4'. The Gamba should be fairly "gritty" and its harmonics would provide the effect of a small mixture. Since Dave already has a Gamba (labial "Oboe"), it might be easy for him to experiment, playing the Gamba a 4' pitch with the existing Diapason and Octave.   While this might seem a bit strange, I know that on Skinner opus #138 (in the vicinity here), you can couple the Swell 8' Salicional (fairly "gritty"!) at 4' pitch to the BIG Great 8' Diapason and the effect is a noticeble increase in brightness.   Some Aeolian residence organs also had a similar effect. Nelson Barden wrote about one, a large instrument, in which the Great had a pair of very "nasty" Gambas (String F, in Aeolian parlance). While someone else was playing, he operated the stops, building up a crescendo. At the end, = since he ran out of stops to add, he included the "ugly" Gambas. The effect, he wrote, was a "sunshine Mixture" that very nicely crowned the full organ.   So, try it -- you might like it!   Larry Chace        
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: Changing Bourdon Cutups From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2002 06:47:34 -0800   Hi, Roy and List. I used to have a 16' octave of a Violone made of = redwood by the Murray Harris Co. It was originally voiced on high pressure (I think 8"-10") but had the pressure lowered by lowering the cutup via the expedient of slips (1"+-) of carefully fitted redwood between the pipes' ears. While I know that some of us would have been happier if the wood slips had been placed between the VOICER'S ears, I must say that they looked and sounded great. In fact, the beautifully crafted redwood additions fitted so well that they were virtually invisible at any distance. On removal, one of those great-looking additions revealed its source: a Roi-Tan cigar box... ;-)     At 02:01 AM 1/4/02 EST, Jess4203@aol.com wrote: >What would I be likely to accomplish by using lead/spotted >metal/carefully crafted wood to change the cutup to something lower? > >TIA, >Roy Kersey   Regards, Bob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA http://home.jps.net/~rrloesch/index.htm    
(back) Subject: Power consumption From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 13:44:27 EST   Someone earlier posted about his 5 HP blower not making much notice on his =   power bill, just for my own curiosity I ran mine for 1/4 hour and noted = the readings. The 2 HP orgoblo and the Marche' rectifier running used about 1-1/2 kw, = tho the computer was on and the refrigerator but that's all.   So ballpark it could be about 5 kw per hour to run the organ, here the = power is $.06899, rounded out to 7 cents a kw comes out to around $.35 an hour = and that's not bad at all. Even if one practiced every day for 2 hours, the hit on the power bill = would only amount to about $21 and that sure can get buried unnoticed if you = have heat pump lots of lights, dishwasher, electric dryer or heaters.   Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: e-mail address change From: "Carl and Halie Dodrill" <dodrill@accessone.com> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 16:58:34 -0800   CHange DIYAPASON-L carl@dodrill.net    
(back) Subject: Wind conductors From: "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@sockets.net> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 20:11:28 -0600   Hello All,   I am in the process of establishing the layout of my organ in the new = music room. It is not practical to use some of the conductors that originally connected some of the reservoirs to their chests. Those conductors are mostly 4 inch square wood conductors. It is my plan to use 4 inch PVC, which is of course 22 percent smaller in cross sectional area.   I would like to hear comments about the pros and cons of this change. The chests involved are a two rank pedal string, 16' and 8', a unit pedal 16' bourdon, and a unit open 8' diapasion scale 44. All are on 4 1/2 inches of wind. This is an Aeolian organ and the pedal ranks are the standard violone, cello and bourdon. The bung on the bourdon is already at 4 inch diameter, but that conductor transitioned from the 4' square to round within ten inches of the chest.   The length of 4 inch PVC to the pedal chests will be less than 2 feet to each chest. The diapasion line will be a bit longer. I think the 4 inch PVC is large enough, and using 6 inch PVC is just too large and too bulky.   Bob Taylor (agreeing that 2002 is indeed the year of the organ)        
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wind conductors From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 23:40:45 EST     In a message dated 1/4/02 8:13:28 PM, rtaylor@sockets.net writes:   >Hello All, > >I am in the process of establishing the layout of my organ in the new = music >room. It is not practical to use some of the conductors that originally >connected some of the reservoirs to their chests. Those conductors are >mostly 4 inch square wood conductors. It is my plan to use 4 inch PVC, >which is of course 22 percent smaller in cross sectional area.   Well, 4" square would be 16 square inches (0.111 sq feet)   4" pvc would be about 0.087 sq feet   Shame they don't have 4-1/2" pvc cause that would do it. I agree 6" pvc is =   real clunky so are the fittings, not to mention they cost a LOT more than = 4" and those were two reasons I went to 4" instead of 6" as I wanted to.   >The bung on the bourdon is already at 4 inch >diameter, but that conductor transitioned from the 4' square to round >within ten inches of the chest.   I don't see a problem since the bung is already restricted to 4", it's usually better to go with bigger but you can't really do that unless you = make new square lines. Is there a problem with making some new square ones out = of wood? Our shop uses 1/2" MDF sheets for windtrunks and lines almost exclusively, =   and pvc and flex only when required and the pvc gets painted flat black geez...   >6" pvc is too bulky   The actual outside measurements of the 6" fittings is closer to 7" at the rims of elbows and the like, pretty clunky.   Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/