DIYAPASON-L Digest #491 - Sunday, January 13, 2002
 
Paint/pipes et.al.
  by <LLWheels@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Paint/pipes et.al.
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Paint/pipes et.al.
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Paint/pipes et.al.
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Paint/pipes et.al.
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Paint/pipes et.al.
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Paint/pipes et.al.
  by "Jon" <sparky@CEINetworks.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Paint/pipes et.al.
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Paint/pipes et.al.
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Paint/pipes et.al.
  by <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com>
Racking questions/discussion
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Removing Masking Tape
  by "Paul Soulek" <pipeorganpaul@yahoo.com>
Measuring Watts
  by "Marc Kaufman" <kaufman@cs.stanford.edu>
Removing Masking Tape
  by "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net>
 

(back) Subject: Paint/pipes et.al. From: <LLWheels@aol.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 00:55:39 EST     --part1_e6.215f0500.29727b5b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   During our rebuild, we are moving a set of Degan class A chimes, which had =   been installed in a chamber, to an exposed position. At some time in the past, some scoundrel painted the front (only) of the tubes with flat black =   paint, probably because they reflected through the screen. (Heaven forbid chimes or pipes be seen through the screen - God would be distracted!!) = };-)   I don't know what kind of paint it is, but I suspect it is not latex, = because I had a can of "Goof-Off" handy and it seemed to have no effect on the = paint.   Any suggestions.   Larry L. Wheelock Madison, Wisconsin   "SI HOC LEGERE SCIS NIMIUM ERUDITONIS HABES"   --part1_e6.215f0500.29727b5b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2>During our rebuild, we are = moving a set of Degan class A chimes, which had been installed in a = chamber, to an exposed position. At some time in the past, some scoundrel = painted the front (only) of the tubes with flat black paint, probably = because they reflected through the screen. (Heaven forbid chimes or pipes = be seen through the screen - God would be distracted!!)&nbsp; };-)<BR> <BR> I don't know what kind of paint it is, but I suspect it is not latex, = because I had a can of "Goof-Off" handy and it seemed to have no effect on = the paint.<BR> <BR> Any suggestions.<BR> <BR> Larry L. Wheelock<BR> Madison, Wisconsin<BR> <BR> "SI HOC LEGERE SCIS NIMIUM ERUDITONIS HABES"</FONT></HTML>   --part1_e6.215f0500.29727b5b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Paint/pipes et.al. From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 02:03:23 EST     In a message dated 1/12/02 11:56:41 PM, LLWheels@aol.com writes:   >During our rebuild, we are moving a set of Degan class A chimes, which >had >been installed in a chamber, to an exposed position. At some time in the >past, some scoundrel painted the front (only) of the tubes with flat = black > >paint, probably because they reflected through the screen. (Heaven forbid >chimes or pipes be seen through the screen - God would be distracted!!)   Yeah, a certain someone I know has that same obsession with painting stuff =   brown so it can't be seen or looks like wood, PVC gets wiped down with = rags soaked in lacq thinner, and painted FLAT black, talk about a color that shows EVERY little scuff, mark or dust UGH!!!!!!!!!!   Going back to the thread about quality and appearances, thats one area = where trying to beautify or adapt materials to an organ use that were never designed for such a thing gets rediculous on the labor part and isn't = worth the time and money. For example, 2 days for cleaning and painting then having to wrap in brown =   paper to ship, rough plastic that was made to be used for sewer and water =   lines, (um they DO MAKE black plastic pipe, Iv'e used it) One little = scratch and that nice "black" pipe shows glaring white. I would remove sticky = labels but I wouldn't paint the stuff.   Or galvanized 3/4" conduit made to be used for running electrical wiring where no one cares what it looks like, like in the basement, not cleaned with thinner to remove the ink measure marks and maker name and painted = for supporting rackboards in an organ. I've also seen 10' long cardboard tubes such as used for cores for paper = and wrapping, used for small windlines, SOAKED in trays full of lacquer to = "seal" the cardboard, wiped down and set at an angle to drain, that took a couple = or three days and the lacquer tended to make the cardboard turn mottled in appearance.   Probably 1/4 of the tubes were unusable, they originally came dented, = scraped or crushed from the maker when shipped via truck (were just bundled with strapping and dumped in the truck), utility products like that are made = for a one time throwaway use not appearance.     Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: Paint/pipes et.al. From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 03:53:55 -0600   Randall <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> wrote:   > Yeah, a certain someone I know has that same obsession with painting > stuff brown   > Going back to the thread about quality and appearances, thats one area = where > trying to beautify or adapt materials to an organ use that were never > designed for such a thing gets rediculous on the labor part and isn't = worth > the time and money.   And the alternatives are???? > For example, 2 days for cleaning and painting then having to wrap in = brown > paper to ship, rough plastic that was made to be used for sewer and = water > lines, (um they DO MAKE black plastic pipe, Iv'e used it)   It's called A.B.S. However, it's not as widely available, and I don't think there's the assortment of fittings for it like there is for P.V.C.   > One little scratch and that nice "black" pipe shows glaring white.   It makes more sense to paint it on the job after installation, rather than go to such extremes beforehand. Otherwise, adapt to the electrical Schedule 40 pipe, which usually comes in gray. > Or galvanized 3/4" conduit <snip> for supporting rackboards in an > = organ.   We use this too. What's wrong with it?? I can't understand painting it, because it actually "matches" the pipework pretty well in its "natural" state.   > I've also seen 10' long cardboard tubes such as used for cores for paper = and > wrapping, used for small windlines, SOAKED in trays full of lacquer to = "seal" > the cardboard, wiped down and set at an angle to drain, that took a = couple or > three days and the lacquer tended to make the cardboard turn mottled in > appearance.   Hinners used to use something like this also. I didn't think anyone did this anymore with the advent of PVC and the array of fittings available for it.   Faithfully, Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Paint/pipes et.al. From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 12:32:31 EST     In a message dated 1/13/02 3:49:12 AM, arpschneider@starband.net writes:     >And the alternatives are????   Leaving them in their natural finish perhaps, the only one who is going to =   see rack supports or windlines buried inside an organ are the the guys or gals who tune them     >It's called A.B.S. However, it's not as widely available, and I don't >think there's the assortment of fittings for it like there is for P.V.C.   I know about ABS, I've used it and there should be the same assortment of fittings as for PVC since it's used for sewer and drain     >It makes more sense to paint it on the job after installation, rather >than go to such extremes beforehand.   But then there's other problems or issues with doing that and they won't look perfect either.       >Otherwise, adapt to the electrical >Schedule 40 pipe, which usually comes in gray.   Frankly I don't see what difference the final color makes. white, black, grey.. when it's function is a windline to hose off small chests and it's = all buried under, behind or around things. I would leave it it's original = color and just clean any lables off and dirt/marks     >> Or galvanized 3/4" conduit <snip> for supporting rackboards in an > = organ.   >We use this too. What's wrong with it?? I can't understand painting it, >because it actually "matches" the pipework pretty well in its "natural" >state.   That it does, but it's not ~perfect~, so the stuff gets worked on.     >> I've also seen 10' long cardboard tubes such as used for cores for = paper >and >> wrapping, used for small windlines, SOAKED in trays full of lacquer to   >Hinners used to use something like this also. I didn't think anyone did >this anymore with the advent of PVC and the array of fittings available >for it.   I didn't think so either till a truck dropped off a load of it to test = out, as potential replacements for the galvanized conduit used to wind things = like mounted cornets. If you figure a shop labor rate of $50 an hour and 2 days = to do things like this, (cleaning, painting pvc, etc) are the end results = worth that cost?     Here's 2 photos I uploaded of a hanging lamp I made for the organ room out = of red oak, the 6 openings will have frosted glass, and the smaller openings = in it will have red stained glass. Not shown in it is the brass 6 sided = "cone" top that fits between the chains and goes up about 1/2 way.   http://members.aol.com/churchdogue/room.jpg http://members.aol.com/churchdogue/lamp.jpg          
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Paint/pipes et.al. From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 13:25:04 -0500   Hi Homeys, The week I spent at Nichols and Simpson Organs in Little Rock = impressed me with the care and sense of craftsmanship that went into their chests and = rack boards. The backboards were custom made of band sawn ply to form the exact = shape needed to support the ranks upon each particular chest. Every sharp edge = was lovingly smoothed and the racks were spaced above the chests with study = wooden dowel stock that was firmly attached to the toe board in strategic = locations. The rack board was then attached to the top of these dowels with screws such = that they could be easily removed for future chest maintenance. The whole rack = board system recieved an excellent natural finish after which felt was glued = onto the pipe support cut-outs. The finished product resembled the finest piece of furniture. I took a picture of a chest they were installing in a Methodist = Church in Paragould AR., but have lost it in the maze of my computer storage = system. Perhaps David or Tim would be kind enough to post a picture of one of = their expert creations so we can all see how the experts feel about the = appearance of chest work even though it is hidden in the chambers. I don't recall how = they ran major wind trunks, but I did see neatly run orgaflex used to feed their = set-off pipes. I might also mention that the wiring of the electrical components = was a beauty to behold with component boards neatly connected with impeccably = coiled relay wiring. These boards were covered with a clear plex to display the = wonders of it all. I'm not saying that the chamber contents cannot be accomplished and = made to function without all this careful attention to detail, but the results of = such attention are spectacular when anyone views an N&S pipe chamber. It gives = one a strong sense of the pride and craftsmanship of this company.   Cheers Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Paint/pipes et.al. From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 14:34:38 EST     In a message dated 1/13/02 12:24:04 PM, mike3247@earthlink.net writes:   >Hi Homeys, > The week I spent at Nichols and Simpson Organs in Little Rock = impressed >me >with the care and sense of craftsmanship that went into their chests and >rack boards. The backboards were custom made of band sawn ply to form the =   exact >shape needed to support the ranks upon each particular chest. Every sharp =   edge >was lovingly smoothed and the racks were spaced above the chests with = study >wooden dowel stock that was firmly attached to the toe board in strategic =   locations.   Hi Mike,   I'm not sure how many chests and rackboards you have examined, but going = by your description it sounds like the typical making of chests and racking, even OSI from whom we bought two custom = built pitman chests does a great job making the chest and raching nice looking = and clear finished like furniture. They use the standard rack pins which I believe you named "dowels" above. That has been pretty standard for ages, even the 1927 Kilgen and the 1934 Reuter I salvaged used these rack pins = and all the boards had bevelled sanded edges.   OSI uses solid boards for racking, we use 3/4 apple ply, the solid boards =   can tend to split or break if a careless person step on them wrong and = pipes are not in     >The rack board was then attached to the top of these dowels with screws = such >that they could be easily removed for future chest maintenance.   Shouldn't need screws for this if you are describing what I am thinking = you are, no screws are necessary because the pins have a reduced diameter on = both ends that fit into a hole in the chest and into a hole in the racking.   >The whole rack >board system recieved an excellent natural finish after which felt was = glued >onto the pipe support cut-outs.   Pretty typical too, clear finish anyway, not sure about the felt but we = felt all rack holes so the pipes are snug and don't rattle.     >in Paragould AR., but have lost it in the maze of my computer storage = system. >Perhaps David or Tim would be kind enough to post a picture of one of = their >expert creations so we can all see how the experts feel about the = appearance >of chest work even though it is hidden in the chambers.   Another thing is, the chest is covered on top with a forest of pipes, and around it with walk boards, but the smoother the chest surfaces are the = less dust and dirt would tend to cling to it, and since the technician would be =   working around the chests they should be smooth, free of sharp edges, = screw heads that could catch clothing or trip someone etc   >I don't recall how >they ran >major wind trunks, but I did see neatly run orgaflex used to feed their >set-off   Nothing wrong with orgaflex but it only comes up to I think 6" or 8" = sizes, so we make wood trucks for larger windlines.     >pipes. I might also mention that the wiring of the electrical components >was a >beauty to behold with component boards neatly connected with impeccably >coiled >relay wiring.   Now THERE it makes perfect sense to keep all the wiring in perfect order, neat, and organized because when you have a harness with hundreds of wires = in it, it BETTER be organized and neat or there will be trouble later. I wish I could wire like our Bob does, he does damn nice wiring, in fact = my moller manuals had gorgeous cross-wiring under them for the various octave =   couplings, all laid out in nice, neat, taught, fan fold patterns. Try as I =   might I was unable to replicate that when I replaced all the old cloth covered wires.   > I'm not saying that the chamber contents cannot be accomplished and >made to >function without all this careful attention to detail, but the results >of such >attention are spectacular when anyone views an N&S pipe chamber. It gives >one a >strong sense of the pride and craftsmanship of this company.   The other issue is the COST, remember, N&S is a business like any other = that has to make money, there's a fine line between doing things right or = nicely, and going overboard, a difference between good craftsmanship, and CRAPSmanship. For a business, one has to remember the client Church may not understand = or care about the difference between one builder's really nice walkboards, windlines etc and another's, they care what it SOUNDS like, and the cost = is the big factor that can determine if they will even HAVE a pipe organ = instead of going cheap with an electronic.   For you and I with our home instruments, we don't worry about how much = time, labor it takes, there's no deadline or contract and if it takes a year or = ten to complete it doesn't matter. The home hobby builder (us here) may = either not know about products or items available or how things are made, may not =   have complete tools, a lathe, milling machine, $20,000 table saw or the = $$$ to buy components from Laukhuff in Germany or the like. I can see where some of us have to cut corners for those very reasons, = but one reason I mentioned the lead sheet on wood pipes for lowering cutups looking poorly is that perhaps those who are considering doing that did = not know there may be a better way or another way that could work better and = look better too. If someone doesn't feel that additional work is worth it to = them for appearances that is fine, at least they have the information to = decide.   How about walkboards? My chamber is divided in two, with two chests in each, and I built a walkboard between the chests that folds up and out of the way against the back wall when not needed to reach the tops of the taller pipes. It took = more time to add piano hinges to them, I also added a narrow strip of wood on = the top edges of the walkboards so tools and the like can't roll off and fall down. To get up on the walkboards or to the short one between the = chambers I added nice grab handles bolted to the walls.   My chest bungs are held in with washered wingnuts on short 1/4-20 hanger bolts, so about 5 turns of each and the nut is off and the bung drops = down, no screw driver, tool or wrench needed.   The flooring in the chamber is linoleum, and clear enough it can be = vacuumed and mopped to remove grit and dust.   In my basement the 4" PVC lines are left as they came from the store, = plain white, I did not paint them nor will I, but the wood trunks I built from laminated strips of wood cut offs were all given several heavy coats of lacquer on the outside, and coated with glue on the inside to seal them. I did take the time to clean, degrease the blower and paint it gloss black =   with grey on the motor supports and back board, it looks great but another =   reason for doing that was a clean motor and machine will be easier to = keep clean as well as notice immediately if there is any oil or grease drips or =   other problem like a hot bearing which may discolor the paint and show it = has a problem.   I also reinforced both reservoirs inside with screw blocks and lacquered = them inside and out.   Small details like this go a long way towards making maintenance easier as =   well as look better.   Randall                                                                      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Paint/pipes et.al. From: "Jon" <sparky@CEINetworks.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 16:32:18 -0500   Why must you argue with everything Randall? We are usually all aware of = the things you say or in the case of your electrical metering, unaware of it because its not true.   ~jon    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Paint/pipes et.al. From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 16:43:45 -0500       Mpmollerorgan@aol.com wrote:   > Hi Mike, > > I'm not sure how many chests and rackboards you have examined,   <Hi Randall, Let me first say I am quite impressed with your contributions to this = list. Your posts make for exciting and informative reading to those of us who = are so in love with pipe organs. I admit to my very limited experience examining = organ chambers, in fact most I have seen are brand new. The Severance Hall = instrument is a many splendored wonder as I attest to in my report at:   http://members.tripod.com/Brucon502/id56.htm   My N&S shop visit saw me try to climb into an older Moller (I believe) chamber, but alas, I was too big to fit past the major wind line or = ventilation duct that nearly occluded the opening (grin)     > They use the standard rack pins which I > believe you named "dowels" above.   <Ahh, I'm a bit vague on correct terminology at this point too. They look = like round wooden pieces, so I simply labeled them as dowels, albeit long ones. = (grin)   > Shouldn't need screws for this if you are describing what I am thinking = you > are, no screws are necessary because the pins have a reduced diameter on = both > ends that fit into a hole in the chest and into a hole in the racking.   <Now that you mention this, I do remember that the rack board was = assembled onto the toe board and then the entire assembly was placed atop its = corresponding slider plate and then appropriately screwed down to the top of the chest completing the slider action mechanism for that particular rank. There = were 4 or 5 slider plates on this chest, and I remember being astounded by the elegant simplicity of this system, and how precision the construction needed to be = to get all the holes to line up, get the holes all sealed, and allow the sliders = to work without unnecessary friction. The slider plates were sprayed with some = super slickery stuff before assembly to insure smooth operation.   > > > not sure about the felt but we felt > all rack holes so the pipes are snug and don't rattle.   <I think this what I was describing but in some cases the rack holes were = slotted out to the perimeter of the rack board so the pipes would not have to be = raised as high to remove them--a major consideration when ceiling height is limited.   > > Another thing is, the chest is covered on top with a forest of pipes, = and > around it with walk boards, but the smoother the chest surfaces are the = less > dust and dirt would tend to cling to it, and since the technician would = be > working around the chests they should be smooth, free of sharp edges, = screw > heads that could catch clothing or trip someone etc   < As I begin my organ chamber excursions, one of the biggest fears I have = is tripping and heaven forbid, falling upon pipes. I am a 6' 240# auto = mechanic, and not yet as graceful as I will need to be if I am to continue being = welcomed into pipe chambers. (grin)   > Now THERE it makes perfect sense to keep all the wiring in perfect = order, > neat, and organized because when you have a harness with hundreds of = wires in > it, it BETTER be organized and neat or there will be trouble later. > I wish I could wire like our Bob does, he does damn nice wiring, in fact = my > moller manuals had gorgeous cross-wiring under them for the various = octave > couplings, all laid out in nice, neat, taught, fan fold patterns. Try as = I > might I was unable to replicate that when I replaced all the old cloth > covered wires.   <Though Tim Bovard is involved in all of the aspects of N&S organbuilding, = I think he does much of the electronic work, and takes huge pride in the = appearance of it. I know I will carry the picture of it in my mind as a model if ever called = upon to wire anything ever again.   > The other issue is the COST, remember, N&S is a business like any other = that > has to make money, there's a fine line between doing things right or = nicely, > and going overboard, a difference between good craftsmanship, and > CRAPSmanship.   <I know that this is one of Joe Nichol's concerns at N&S, and I wouldn't dare to second guess his judgment about it. The 5 year long line of clients = waiting for their N&S organs testifies to the fact that he and Wayne Simpson seem to = be balancing this issue properly. I'm certain that appearance as well as the = sound of their instruments are established signatures whose formula will not be = compromised to satisfy the bottom line of the contract. There are other areas of = compromise such as recycling appropriate ranks and building with an awareness of = "prepared for" portions such that the instrument will eventually reach all its = design goals without sacrificing the standard they build to.     Small details like this go a long way towards making maintenance easier as = well as look better.   Randall   < And it seems you are also balancing priorities very well Randall. I hope = that someday we can both visit each other's instruments, inside and out, and = know that we were both on the same page today about organ construction. I'm a few = steps behind you at this point, but am catching up as furiously as I can.   Cheers Mike    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Paint/pipes et.al. From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 17:50:08 EST     In a message dated 1/13/02 3:31:37 PM, sparky@CEINetworks.com writes:   >Why must you argue with everything Randall? We are usually all aware of >the >things you say or in the case of your electrical metering, unaware of it >because its not true. > >~jon >   So in other words I'm a liar is that it?   Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Paint/pipes et.al. From: <Mpmollerorgan@aol.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 17:51:31 EST     In a message dated 1/13/02 3:42:59 PM, mike3247@earthlink.net writes:   > > >Mpmollerorgan@aol.com wrote: > >> Hi Mike, >> >> I'm not sure how many chests and rackboards you have examined, > ><Hi Randall, > Let me first say I am quite impressed with your contributions to this >list.     Thanks, seems some are not so I will just sit back and read, no more posts =   then to annoy people with. Take care!   Randall http://members.aol.com/mpmollerorgan/  
(back) Subject: Racking questions/discussion From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 21:39:45 -0600   Mike wrote:   > The backboards were custom made of band sawn ply to form the > exact > >shape needed to support the ranks upon each particular chest. Every = sharp > edge > >was lovingly smoothed and the racks were spaced above the chests with = study > >wooden dowel stock that was firmly attached to the toe board in = strategic > locations.   Then Randall replies: > I'm not sure how many chests and rackboards you have examined, but going = by > your description it sounds like the typical > making of chests and racking, even OSI from whom we bought two custom = built > pitman chests does a great job making the chest and raching nice looking = and > clear finished like furniture. They use the standard rack pins which I > believe you named "dowels" above. That has been pretty standard for = ages, > even the 1927 Kilgen and the 1934 Reuter I salvaged used these rack = pins and > all the boards had bevelled sanded edges.   Actually: I think that Mike is describing the procedure for building Sky Racks for larger pipes. We also do the same thing, except that we use 1/2" or 3/4" E.M.T. Conduit (depending upon the size of the pipes in question!) to support them, rather than dowels, since we feel it's much stronger.   It's sometimes easy for those who are uninitiated in terms of an organ lexicon to be misunderstood. Moreover, different terms are used by different shops, depending up on one's training and background.   Faithfully, Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL  
(back) Subject: Removing Masking Tape From: "Paul Soulek" <pipeorganpaul@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 21:45:33 -0600   As I attempt to clean up my pipes, there are two of them with masking tape. Does anyone have any specific tips/success stories that they would share about removing masking tape? It's been on there for quite a while and I don't know where to start.   Thanks! Paul   _________________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Measuring Watts From: "Marc Kaufman" <kaufman@cs.stanford.edu> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 20:34:13 -0800   There is a quick way to measure the power demand without running the motor for an hour.   Your electric meter has a disk that turns at a rate proportional to the instantaneous power demand. Somewhere on the meter face is a number, such as "Rr 7.2", which means that each revolution of the disk is 7.2 Watt-Hours (or whatever number is on your meter). If you count 'n' revolutions of the disk in 's' seconds there are (n * 3600 * Rr)/s Watt-Hours per hour, meaning that the current draw is that many watts.  
(back) Subject: Removing Masking Tape From: "The Schneider Family" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 22:53:21 -0600   Paul Soulek wrote: > As I attempt to clean up my pipes, there are two of them with masking > tape. Does anyone have any specific tips/success stories that they would > share about removing masking tape? It's been on there for quite a while > and I don't know where to start.   Try the following products in this order:   1) Goo Gone   2) Goof Off   3) Lacquer Thinner.   Be very careful with the last two as they are very flammable. Properly dispose of any rags you soak in these materials. My favorite method is to incinerate them in a metal barrel outside.   Faithfully, Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Pipe Organ Builders 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpschneider@starband.net HOME EMAIL mailto:arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com WEB PAGE URL