DIYAPASON-L Digest #506 - Monday, January 28, 2002
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  [Fwd: Re: A hopeful sign]
  by "F. Richard Burt" <dorian.organs@verizon.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  [Fwd: Re: A hopeful sign]
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  progress report
  by "STEVE PITTS" <steve.pitts@adtran.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  progress report
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
RE: [Residence Organs]  progress report
  by "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  wood pipe finishing, was progress report.
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  wood pipe finishing, was progress report.
  by "Mac Hayes" <mach37@mindspring.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] [Fwd: Re: A hopeful sign] From: "F. Richard Burt" <dorian.organs@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 03:32:58 -0600   Mac Hayes wrote: > * * * > > Bob Elms et al.: > > James, is any firm making spinets now?... Well, I sell an organ that might be called a spinet, but in my mind it was a "parlor organ." <grins> This beast has 20 stops, divided between bass/accompaniment at about tenor G or A and treble (solo, etc.), but it is what most folks call a toaster, so haven't mentioned it before. The beast is designed much like the old parlor reed organs that you worked up sore calf muscles while pumping. It comes in a nice console case and comes with three-channels of audio. I guess I assumed that on a list where people are talking about three and four manual, mostly theater style organs that a throw-back to the days before Hammonds would be of interest. We also offer a decent small "practice" organ with two manuals and pedal (pure basic stuff; no frills or extensive stop lists). This now comes with four channels of audio. However, this one will not be as portable as the one that Christopher is talking about. I have another organ builder friend who is planning to offer a small tracker beast that would be suitable for a home installation, but that's future speculation. The plans are serious and are pending suffucient positive market reports to determine if they are more than just "pipe dreams." If any of you are interested, I will inquire in more detail concerning a prospectus for one of these little trackers. Please address me off-list. Appreciatively, F. Richard Burt ..  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] [Fwd: Re: A hopeful sign] From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 06:52:37 -0600   At 8:59 PM -0800 1/27/02, Mac Hayes wrote: >Christopher Sabatowich said very nearly the same thing, and I asked his >permission to repost his message on DIYAPASON-L. He had one >qualification, that I not leave out the post (by Bob Elms) which >inspired his post, so here is the whole thing. >-Mac Hayes   Just for everyone's information I have just added Christopher to the list at his request.   David *************************************** Owner - DIYAPASON-L  
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] progress report From: "STEVE PITTS" <steve.pitts@adtran.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 15:43:32 -0600       Greetings List Some of you may remember my posting about cleaning painted pipes several = weeks ago. I have a wooden 32 note 16 ft Bourdon and a 32 note 16 ft = Lieblich Gedeckt both of which were painted a dull brown color. They were = probably painted that color to make them "less obtrusive".My preferences = are just the opposite,I like seeing exposed pipework and consider it very = attractive.I also really like unpainted wooden pipe organ pipes , so I = decided to clean the paint off of them. So far I have cleaned the paint = off of most of the 16ft Bourdons and I have the say it has been a very = rewarding venture. The cleaned, sanded pipes are very beautiful, far more = attractive than with the dull brown paint. The wood is a very light color, = almost like pine. At this point I am beginning to think about exactly what = to do next, staining, varnishing , etc. Does anyone have any pointers about wood refinishing that might be = helpful?   thanks Steve Pitts  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] progress report From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 17:02:38 -0500   Hi Steve, If you are happy with the color, a simple sprayed on application of = clear lacquer will seal them and protect them just fine according to = several seasoned organ builders I know. It also makes them most beautiful, = bringing out the grain nicely and hiding many of the imperfections you = might have caused during the stripping process. The exact product name I = used will have to come from my friends at Nichols and Simpson, but I'm = sure if we show enough patience, one of them will respond to this, and = tell us exactly what they use. (grin). If you want them a different color, = an appropriate stain will need to be applied before the pipes are = lacquered.   Cheers Mike   STEVE PITTS wrote:   > Greetings List > Some of you may remember my posting about cleaning painted pipes several = weeks ago. I have a wooden 32 note 16 ft Bourdon and a 32 note 16 ft = Lieblich Gedeckt both of which were painted a dull brown color. They were = probably painted that color to make them "less obtrusive".My preferences = are just the opposite,I like seeing exposed pipework and consider it very = attractive.I also really like unpainted wooden pipe organ pipes , so I = decided to clean the paint off of them. So far I have cleaned the paint = off of most of the 16ft Bourdons and I have the say it has been a very = rewarding venture. The cleaned, sanded pipes are very beautiful, far more = attractive than with the dull brown paint. The wood is a very light color, = almost like pine. At this point I am beginning to think about exactly what = to do next, staining, varnishing , etc. > Does anyone have any pointers about wood refinishing that might be = helpful? > > thanks > Steve Pitts > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] progress report From: "Elders, Craig" <c.elders@tcu.edu> Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 16:13:10 -0600   Good afternoon, Steve!   I refinished my 16' Bourdon. Boy, as much area as on those lower few = pipes, it was like sanding and finishing all the walls of a house.   After I had finished sanding everything, I used a high gloss lacquer and a sprayer. I finished them the same way as I did my chests, frames, etc. Somewhere around 12 to 18 coats. Two coats, sanding, 2 more coats, = sanding, 2 more etc. (Starting with 150 grit sandpaper and ended up somewhere = around 600 on the last sanding.) Beautiful to look at! On the Bourdon Pipes, I did use a darker stain on the tuning "knobs" and on the front mouths that can be removed. Then after staining, they were lacquered like everything else. It sure makes them look nice.   (As a side note, I did all my final sanding and lacquering outside on my driveway. The neighborhood kids were always coming by to see what I was doing. When they were younger and before they found out that sanding was not as much fun as it looked, I would give them a little block of wood = with sandpaper around it. So I often had some help with all that initial sanding. That ended quickly and I was left to do it myself. Even my dog also said no as she thought guarding me and the "stuff" was enough.)   Best of luck on the project.   Craig Elders       -----Original Message----- From: STEVE PITTS [mailto:steve.pitts@adtran.com]   Greetings List Some of you may remember my posting about cleaning painted pipes several weeks ago. I have a wooden 32 note 16 ft Bourdon and a 32 note 16 ft Lieblich Gedeckt both of which were painted a dull brown color. They were probably painted that color to make them "less obtrusive".My preferences = are just the opposite,I like seeing exposed pipework and consider it very attractive.I also really like unpainted wooden pipe organ pipes , so I decided to clean the paint off of them. So far I have cleaned the paint = off of most of the 16ft Bourdons and I have the say it has been a very = rewarding venture. The cleaned, sanded pipes are very beautiful, far more attractive than with the dull brown paint. The wood is a very light color, almost = like pine. At this point I am beginning to think about exactly what to do next, staining, varnishing , etc. Does anyone have any pointers about wood refinishing that might be = helpful?   thanks Steve Pitts    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] wood pipe finishing, was progress report. From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 17:15:25 EST   Hi Steve--- Re: finishing wood pipes---I'm a new tecchie in most everything but organbuilding,,,and in that field I am an old tecchie,,,that having been said--- I use the tried and true shellac on wood pipes. It brushes nicely,,,the *amber* coloration that can be purchased gives a nice honey color to the pipes, its dry to the touch in almost seconds, cleans up and dilutes with common alcohol,,,has no environmental problems that I know of,,,can be "recovered" if scratched or dinged without problem. Now that shellac is available in longer pot (can) life formulations,,its easy to keep a small = can around, or take it out on jobs for quick fixes. Give it a try and see what =   you think. Regards, ---Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] wood pipe finishing, was progress report. From: "Mac Hayes" <mach37@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 20:18:45 -0800   GRSCoLVR@aol.com wrote: > ... > I use the tried and true shellac on wood pipes. It brushes nicely,,,     I'll second Roc's vote for shellac. I have used both the homebrew kind - shellac flakes bought from OSI and dissolved in shellac thinner - and the Zinnser "Bulls Eye" bought at Home Depot. Everything Roc said about the brush application process is true. Spraying is quicker if you have the equipment, but then you have the overspray problem, so I prefer brushing. If you buy Zinnser, get the big cans for economy. I'm looking at one of the can labels right now and it is called Zinnser Bulls Eye Shellac, Amber, Sealer & Finish. In fine print it says "formerly called 3lb orange." I believe it also comes in "white" - clear shellac.   Mac Hayes