DIYAPASON-L Digest #507 - Tuesday, January 29, 2002
 
Re: wood pipe finishing, was progress report.
  by "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es>
Re: Wood Pipe Finishing
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
Re: TO's and Classical Churchies
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: TO's and Classical Churchies
  by "F. Richard Burt" <dorian.organs@verizon.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: TO's and Classical Churchies
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  wood pipe finishing, was progress report.
  by <d.doerschuk@att.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: TO's and Classical Churchies
  by "Dan Emery" <danemery@yahoo.ca>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: TO's and Classical Churchies
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: TO's and Classical Churchies
  by "Trailrider" <horseback@shell.core.com>
organs (what else?)
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: [Residence Organs]  organs (what else?)
  by "Trailrider" <horseback@shell.core.com>
My console
  by "Trailrider" <horseback@shell.core.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Re: TO's and Classical Churchies
  by "Jimmy" <jrbaird@erols.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  Re: TO's and Classical Churchies
  by "Clyde R. Putman" <cputman@att.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  organs (what else?)
  by "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: [Residence Organs]  organs (what else?)
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: wood pipe finishing, was progress report. From: "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 10:41:19 +0100   Since real shellac isn't available here, I like to use a colorless matt finish varnish (over a couple of coats of transparent wood preserver). The result looks as though the wood has a completely natural finish - better than shiny varnish, IMHO.   Just my 2 euros' worth...   Peter.    
(back) Subject: Re: Wood Pipe Finishing From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 06:47:05 EST   Hi All:   Yes, I, too, thought about refinishing the Bourdons, but I'm anxious to = get the organ playing first. They look like what the furniture people = call "stressed" pine. Lots of nicks and wear and yellowing and that is = charming, too. I can't help but wonder what they would look like = refinished, though. I guess I will have to make sure that the tubing off = is fairly easily reversible so that they can be removed if/when the time = comes. I was surprised no one mentioned stain, as some light woods look very nice = with some stain and it could go better with your decor than plain orange = shellac and bring out the grain some. What follows is certainly not = expert advice, but I have learned a little on my various bookcase/table = projects in the past few years. New pine, and maybe old pine, too, takes = stain in a blotchy way sometimes, and a coat of a commercial pretreatment = (I forget what you call it just now, but it will be next to the stain on = the shelf) or a wash coat of very dilute shellac (I believe 25 to 1 is = right, but check some old books, this is cheaper than the commercial prep) = will deal with this. I recently found that one can't at all expect that = the samples on the can or in the display have anything to do with what the = stain will look like on your wood. I went thru three different kinds on a = pine bookcase trying to match my walnut furniture (reddish brown) and = still did not succeed at all. Some old fashioned h an for you and try it . . . you might want to take a pipe down to the = store and have the wood ID'd . . . were all the old Bourdons made of sugar = pine or what? could it be poplar or something else? I know some of the = new baroquey makers fashion flute of oak, but I've never heard of such in = an old American Organ. I have thought of building a set of wood pipes = just for fun, but I wonder what to use. Any experience with this out = there?   Regards, Roy Kersey  
(back) Subject: Re: TO's and Classical Churchies From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 07:04:26 EST   Hello again all:   F. Richard Burt wrote that (excuse the paraphrasing 'cause I can't get = quote to work onthis computer) this list was mostly about three and four = manual TO's. I haven't taken a poll, Richard, and I don't want to start a = debate or controversy (I love all organs, I just like churchies more), but = I think there are at least several members whose installations are more = toward a classic church spec than a TO. My little project is geared = toward eventually playing JSB and the other baroqueys mostly, and I think = Craig Elders' and Bart Kleinwebber's installations and Randall's Moller = are all more church organs than TOs (I hope I don't offend those = mentioned).   So, let's not fight, but let's not limit ourselves, either.   What ever happened to Homer V. in Canada (?) and his project, which = started out with much homage to the Compenius Organ at Buckeborge? Homer, = are you still out there? My present project is "solenoid" = (electromchanical) action, but I harbor dreams of a tracker one day and I = know that there is one member with a circa 1850's tracker at his house . . = . I just couldn't swing it as a first project.   Any thoughts, folks?   Happy Piping, Roy Kersey  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: TO's and Classical Churchies From: "F. Richard Burt" <dorian.organs@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 07:46:48 -0600   Jess4203@aol.com wrote: > > Hello again all: > > F. Richard Burt wrote that * * * this list was mostly about > three and four manual TO's...... Honestly, Ron... it was just all a preconceived notion that a "fun organ" at home would most likely be a theater organ type. It blinded me to what was actually going on and being posted. Having said that, I was wondering if a kit organ would be of interest, expecially where all you really have to do is assemble the beast. It appears that most home organs have an owner who likes to get his/her hands into it. <grins> The console would arrive complete. The windchest(s) might have to be set on legs. The winding would be complete with all of the necessary material to attach to the windchest and reservoir/regulator/tremulant. The swell shades would need to be assembled (fairly simple task if designed properly) and erected. Depending on your setting, you may need to build a box for the Swell to go with the shutters. Once all of the physical pieces are in place, then pre-built cables would be plugged in. The blower turn-ON relay would be connected to a proper source of current, and you should be able to check for wind egress from each of the pipe valves. Next, you would erect the pipes. Most of the pipes will be short enough to stand erect without upper support. Open 8-foot flues would have haskel'd bass octaves. If you have an offset octave of bottom Bourdons, the rack would be attached to the offset chest first. When all pipes are in place, another pass through all pipe valves should make noise. Tune it. Sit down. Play it. Is this overly simplified? Maybe not. Much of the problem with having a pipe organ at home is adapting it from whatever was acquired from a church somewhere. If the kit is properly designed and voiced, very little should be needed after assembly in its new digs. While we are talking about this, let me add that the pipes would be voiced to fit in a smaller space, typical of most homes. The variants needed after assembly should be minimized to the point that playing it as it is might be quite all right. Sure, if you have pipes that poke out or pipes that fall too far away in the ensemble, some toe work might be needed. That shouldn't be too difficult. The concept started in my mind with what Robert Eby did with his Artisan kits 40 years ago. Then, I remembered that M=F6ller, Kimball, and others had small ensembles that were designed for home use. Put these concepts together, and a modern kit organ gets a whole new prospectus.   If the kit was of mechanical action, then the trackers would be the most complicated part of the puzzle. Properly packed and labeled, the trackers should go together logically in one or two evenings work. After the trackers are all in place, mount the pipes, and complete the case by mounting the swell shades and sides. Tune it. Sit down. Play it. I've watched several people who carried portativ ensembles for use with small orchestra. Tuning it for performance is usually being sure to arrive and have the organ placed at least one hour earlier than the rest of the orchestra. That provided the players sufficient time to have the beast completely tuned by the time the rest of the people were ready to get their chops or fingers warmed up. The real question for home use is how much expert woodworking would be demanded for sculpting, ornamentation, and/or stain to make it into a fine piece of furniture? I believe we must separate these two issues. If the sound is everything, can it be fairly plainly finished and still be acceptable? This inquiring mind would like to know. F. Richard Burt ..  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: TO's and Classical Churchies From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 05:46:56 -0800   At 07:04 AM 1/29/02 EST, Jess4203@aol.com wrote: >So, let's not fight, but let's not limit ourselves, either.   AMEN! There's enough dissention on the 'other' list... ;-)   >My present project is "solenoid" (electromchanical) action, but I harbor >dreams of a tracker one day and I know that there is one member with a = circa >1850's tracker at his house . . . I just couldn't swing it as a first project. > >Any thoughts, folks?   Sounds great! Just don't fall into the 'early 20thC American' style of 8' everything and nothing higher. As William Barnes said, their idea of crescendo is '8' tone going from nearly inaudible to a loud roar'.   Bob, who loves TO, but respects the others, too    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] wood pipe finishing, was progress report. From: <d.doerschuk@att.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 16:42:27 +0000   Mac Hayes and Roc have noted how nice shellac is to work with. I agree, and want to mention that it's only real shortcoming is durability: high-impact surfaces like floors and tabletops should probably not be finished in shellac. Key desks get beat on a good bit, and should probably be finished in something else. Pipes are OK, hopefully no physical trauma there! A shellac french polish finish is really gorgeous!   To the fellows out there sanding away on 16' ranks, I've got a suggestion: if you've a compressor, get a random orbital sander or a palm sander for it. They're TINY, and much much easier to hold for long periods of time than the bulkier electric devices. A friend of mine pointed this out to me, and I ended up feeling it was well worth the purchase price! :-)   One last note: for those of you who are bringing down high cutups on wooden ranks and enjoy making the pipes look beautiful, you may want to consider cutting in a piece of ebony as either a longer replacement for the existing upper lip, or a glued-in add-on using the existing upper lip as a mount. Just like that cool 19th century spy story where the spy hid the secret letter from searchers by putting it out in open sight, modifications can perhaps be best hidden by putting them on display! :-) Ebony is expensive, but you'd only use a little bit. It's really very black and dramatic, and what's more it is hard as the dickens and wears like iron which is a good thing when you start calculating 70 and 80 mph wind velocities oscillating across the upper lip!   Thanks for listening, and good luck to all on their projects! David  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: TO's and Classical Churchies From: "Dan Emery" <danemery@yahoo.ca> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 12:24:25 -0500 (EST)   --0-152788328-1012325065=3D:36188 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii     I believe there used to be pipe organs available in kit form about 20 = years ago. I think I saw ads for them in the Diapason magazines of that = era. Anyone else remember them? One of the reasons I would go with a 'vintage' organ would the cost - = hopefully low! Same would apply to a kit. "F. Richard Burt" <dorian.organs@verizon.net> wrote: Having said that, I = was wondering if a kit organ would be of interest ...     --------------------------------- Web-hosting solutions for home and business! Yahoo! Website Services.   --0-152788328-1012325065=3D:36188 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii   <P> I believe there used to be pipe organs available in kit form about 20 = years ago. I think I saw ads for them in the Diapason magazines = of&nbsp;that era. Anyone else remember them? <P>One of the reasons I would go&nbsp;with a&nbsp;'vintage'&nbsp; organ = would the cost - hopefully low! Same would apply to a kit. <P>&nbsp; <B><I>"F. Richard Burt" = &lt;dorian.organs@verizon.net&gt;</I></B> wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; = PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Having said that, I was wondering if a kit organ would = be of <BR>interest ... </BLOCKQUOTE><p><br><hr size=3D1>Web-hosting = solutions for home and business! <a = href=3D"http://ca.website.yahoo.com"><b>Yahoo! Website = Services</b></a>.<br> --0-152788328-1012325065=3D:36188--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: TO's and Classical Churchies From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 13:10:36 -0500   Hi kitmeisters, The Early Music Shop in the UK offers several small hand pumped organ kits. http://www.e-m-s.com/cat/catstart.html They also offer just the plans for the kits along with several larger pre built practice organs, and even a 4 rank positive built by Laukhuff. They are all pretty pricey though. Cheers Mike   Dan Emery wrote:   > I believe there used to be pipe organs available in kit form about 20 > years ago. I think I saw ads for them in the Diapason magazines of > that era. Anyone else remember them? > > One of the reasons I would go with a 'vintage' organ would the cost - > hopefully low! Same would apply to a kit. > > "F. Richard Burt" <dorian.organs@verizon.net> wrote: > > Having said that, I was wondering if a kit organ would be of > > interest ... > > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------- >    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: TO's and Classical Churchies From: "Trailrider" <horseback@shell.core.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 13:34:27 -0600 (CST)       On Tue, 29 Jan 2002, Dan Emery wrote:   > I believe there used to be pipe organs available in kit form   Check out this link.   http://www.w3.org/people/howcome/o/   Gary K    
(back) Subject: organs (what else?) From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 10:12:29 +1300   Dear List, I've been on this List for a few weeks now but haven't made much input. = I'm impressed by people willing to share their expertise and experience, so = keep it up. Whether theatre organ or not, it doesn't worry me which is predominant, as I plain enjoy reading about whatever it is with pipes. It was a WurliTzer 2/8 in my high school days that got me interested in the organ, but it went on from there to a classical model, though I still play my theatre organ lps and CDs very happily indeed. As an Anglican clergyman just retired, I've got a massive organ project under way. I've been collecting, swopping and trading organ pipes for = years, and now have, at a total financial outlay of about $3,000 (i.e. about US$7,500) some 42 ranks of pipes. The lot will go into a quadruple garage here in my retirement house. I've replaced the roller days with 2nd-hand ranch sliders and windows, have lined and insulated the walls, and am to line and insulate the ceiling as well. The room, which I'm calling my = barn, is 1200 sq.ft, but has sadly not the height I'd really like, being only = 8ft at the eaves and about 13ft down the ridge. My console started off as a 2-deck of some 25 drawknobs, by Croft in about the 1960s. A friend has just finished adding 3rd and 4th manuals. And he's vastly increased the stopjamb size so I can add, unit or straight, = virtually ad infinitum - I had masses of knobs, ferrules and solenoids. So, I now = have 104 drawknobs. The organ will be completely unenclosed, as I haven't the money or = expertise to make swell boxes and mechanisms etc. Too, with my lack of ceiling = height, I don't want any box to mask other pipes. And again, maintenance and = tuning is a lot easier if you can walk right round the pipes. The whole organ will be freestanding as I've got bookcases and record = racks right round the outside walls and need to leave access to them. My drawknobs, some of which I've had to have re-engraved, date from = between about 1875 and 1920, being convex ivory nameplates set in hardwood knobs = and shanks. Gothic script, black for lowercase and red for capitals. As some = of my "old odd" knobs are worth preserving, some of the stopnames will not quite match what the rank is: so, for example I intend re-using two old 19th-century knobs of "twelfth" pitch - one is labelled "Twelfth 3ft" and the other "Twelfth 2 3/4ft". You can see the attraction. The shapes of the knobs varies a bit too - there must be about 15 different shapes over all = my knobs, but that doesn't worry me. I've got plenty of old reservoirs in good nick, and have a number of = chests, but need space for about another 22 ranks yet, and have no idea where = these might eventually come from. I have 4 blowers, believe it or not. 1. 0.25hp Ventus which blows my little Positive at 2.2" pressure. 2. 0.25hp ditto. = 3. Laukhuff 0.75hp. 4. BOB 0.75hp. Altogether, I'll have stacks of wind. As I can't afford the solidstate circuitry for about another 12 months, my friend is wiring up just a few ranks to make something go on each deck, using wiring direct from the existing key contacts. That way, it'll cost = me nothing to get something going, and I can save up for the next year. Using old chests in good order etc., and good ranks that will fit on them, this = is to be the scheme for the next year, realising that the odd design is a matter of necessity meantime: GREAT (6rks) (on 5rk slider chest with an added Principal) 8 Gedackt (metal, Laukhuff, c1975) 4 Principal (unknown make, c1910, plain metal) 4 Rohr Flute (as for 8 Ged.) 2 Prinzipal (as for 8 Ged. but high tin) 1 1/3 Gemsquint (Ten.G# up only, soft metal, as for 8 Gedackt) 1 Oktav (high tin, as for 8 Ged.)   SWELL (unenclosed!) 8 Stopt Diap. (wood, Sandford & Parson, 1883) 8 Vox Humana (Hill Norman & Beard 1931, enormous scale, largely spotted metal)   CHOIR (unenclosed) 8 Gedackt (wood, Tom McKay c1968, unit) 2 Piccolo (extn)   SOLO (unenclosed) 8 Gamba (CC, unknown make, c1910, largely zinc) 8 Celeste (TenC, ditto) 8 Tromba (Hill, Norman & Beard, 1933, on 3.5" wind)   PEDAL 16 SubBass (Croft, 1916, wood) 8 Ped.Flute (extn) 4 Flute (from Choir unit) 16 Trombone (half-length, zinc, Laukhuff 1992) Great to Pedal Tromba to Pedal (no other couplers possible meantime)   Well, that's what it will be, to be up and playing in about 6 weeks' time.   Regards to all, Ross (in New Zealand)      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] organs (what else?) From: "Trailrider" <horseback@shell.core.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 16:11:38 -0600 (CST)   Hello;   I enjoyed your post and It sounds like your console is very beautiful with those drawknobs.   On Wed, 30 Jan 2002, Ross & Lynda Wards wrote:   > Ventus which blows my little Positive at 2.2" pressure.   What ranks do you have on this organ and who built it?   Gary K.    
(back) Subject: My console From: "Trailrider" <horseback@shell.core.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 16:22:12 -0600 (CST)   Hello group;   As I mentioned before I am using a Gulbransen Rialto style console on the little 8 rank theatre type instrument that I am building.   The console was a self contained version of the Gulbransen Rialto J and its model name is Riviera K. Other than the fact that this console was self contained, it resembles the Rialto J to a Tee.   I am in the process of wiring up the key spreaders to the driver boards and I discovered something very interesting. The keyboard spreaders that Gulbransen used in this organ have only 60 connections instead of 61. As far as I can see, key number 61 was never wired down to the tone generators. How strange. I wonder if GULCO had those spreaders made, discovered that they were made wrong in the leaving out of one connection and just decided to go with them anyway thinking that no one wil miss high C. Oh well---I will just add the missing wire.   Gary K.      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Re: TO's and Classical Churchies From: "Jimmy" <jrbaird@erols.com> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 18:55:29 -0500   Dan Emery wrote: > > I believe there used to be pipe organs available in kit form about 20 > years ago. I think I saw ads for them in the Diapason magazines > of that era. Anyone else remember them?   Yup, seen and played them. They were made in Alexandria, Virginia, but can't remember the name of the builder. Think it might have been Dan Meyer?? They came as a kit and were available with up to 4 sets of pipes. I'm not sure if a pedal was an option. The one that I saw had the metal pipes made in France.   Jimmy Baird  
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] Re: TO's and Classical Churchies From: "Clyde R. Putman" <cputman@att.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 20:51:14 -0800   A company called "Pembroke" used to make some kinda cool looking tracker pipe organ kits. Seemed to be modular in design, with a seperate chest for each division, chromatic layout, simple backfall action. I have been keeping my eyes peeled for somthing like that. Probably a builder could "assemble" kits based on Laukhuff parts and come up with somthing rather cool. Whether it would pay the rent is another = question....   Cheers from Dallas where winter is....um....warm??? -Clyde      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] organs (what else?) From: "Ross & Lynda Wards" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 18:05:04 +1300   Hi! The Positive is the Great, for the meantime, i.e. the 8 4 2 1.1/3 1 stops = I listed, plus the 4ft Principal from somewhere else. Not exactly certain of make, but it appears to be Stinkens pipes on a Laukhuff slider chest which is divided TenG/TenG#. Electric action, electric drawstop motors (huge magnet solenoid thingies). The organ was built, as far as I can find out, between 1975 and 1979. It has its own reservoir built in below the slider chest, which latter is a curiosity to me as it has the action on one side, so the thing could sit flat on a table if you wanted it to. The bottom 20 = of the stopt metal 8ft form an attractive tiny showcase about 5'3" high = (adding in the pipe feet and wood casework above the ends of the pipes) and these pipes are tubed off the chest by plastic plumbing pipe (about 1.25" diameter) conveyancing. The thing was put together by Gerard van Delden, a local man here in Paraparaumu Beach, near Wellington, and is the only = organ he ever made, though he made a few fair harpsichords up from kitsets. The Anglican Church at Raumati Beach, about two miles from where I now = live, put this wee organ up for tender about 4 years ago. After six months I = rang the Vicar and asked if it had sold and if so where to. He said no one had bid. So, as a joke I offered him $300, and he told me $250 would be quite enough. The console, so-called, was a horrid little plastic manual with awful stopkeys that sat on a table. I threw it away. (Incidentally, the church then spent $27,000 on a ghastly 2-deck allen electronic). Some = idiot had put extra weights on the organ reservoir and thus increased the = pressure to about 4", so the thing would hardly speak and various pipes were way = off speech. I put it back to 2.2" wind and it now speaks absolutely perfectly, softly and delightfully, but with the 2 and 1 Principals of tin giving a very bright silvery sheen. The wee Gemsquint down to TenG# is tapered and = of dull soft metal, but the sound is perky and rather nice. Of course, as you can imagine, the longest pipe is only about 6 inches long! The top handful of the 1ft break back. Compass is only to 54-note E, but I've no intention of adding to it. I have no way of putting photos on this site, but could I ask here of the Administrator if he would put them on the List if I sent him some snail-mail, i.e. by airmail post? Yes, the design will work I think. To describe the other ranks a bit: The Great 4ft Principal is a very moderate stop of gentle tone full of harmonics. The Vox Humana is of enormous scale - bottom CC is some 4" in diameter, about 2ft long, and the boot is about 1ft long. Tone is large, guttural = and remarkably deep. The Stop.Diap. on the Swell is of square section and of very thin wood, = with very low cutup and no nicking. From TenC up the rank was once open, but a friend put stoppers in and didn't need to touch the voicing. The strings are plain metal, except for the 8ft octave of zinc. Gambas, = not loud, not harsh, but pleasant if unremarkable. The Tromba is a genuine smooth-toned Tromba of quite hefty power for a = home organ. Big scale, but only on about 3.5" wind (yet to be determined exactly). All the Tromba pipes of heavy plain metal, CC is about 7" across the top = of the resonator. Bottom 4 hooded, bottom 12 mitred. Top 20 harmonic, except for very top 5 which are flues to top C. The Choir stopt flute unit is of quite thickish wood, kauri (a new Zealand wood). Unnicked, ordinary mouths, smallish scale. Only top 15 of the 2ft = are open metals - all the rest are stopt wood, so the top stopt wood pipes is about 1/4" by 1/3" internally and speaking length about 1 1/4" with tiny = wee wooden stoppers. A more hollow sound than my other 8ft stopt wood going = in, almost a "rohr" tone. The Pedal 16ft SubBass is 9.5" by 7.5" externally and has a fairly low straight-across cut-up. Sunk blocks. Very deep pervading tone but not = loud. The Trombone, as mentioned, is quite new and of half-length zinc pipes, = but the boots are of wood on two sides and paper on the other two. Laukhufff. It has a dark interesting tone, moderate power, but I would have preferred it to be full-length if I'd been able to find one 2nd-hand! Kind regards, Ross -----Original Message----- From: Trailrider <horseback@shell.core.com> To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Date: Wednesday, January 30, 2002 11:12 AM Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] organs (what else?)     >Hello; > >I enjoyed your post and It sounds like your console is very beautiful = with >those drawknobs. > >On Wed, 30 Jan 2002, Ross & Lynda Wards wrote: > >> Ventus which blows my little Positive at 2.2" pressure. > >What ranks do you have on this organ and who built it? > >Gary K. > > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] organs (what else?) From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 21:10:26 -0800   For Ross, and anyone else on the list who needs: I have a lot of space on my new website, and would be happy to temporarily put up a page, no = charge. Just email the information along with the picture, and I'll put it up.     At 06:05 PM 1/30/02 +1300, Ross & Lynda Wards wrote: > >I have no way of putting photos on this site, but could I ask here of the >Administrator if he would put them on the List if I sent him some >snail-mail, i.e. by airmail post? >       Regards, Cuckoobob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA   Cuckoobob's (more than just Cuckoo) Clocks, 707-272-7070   I buy (too often), sell (too seldom), repair (too few), and collect (too many) cuckoo clocks   NAWCC 140818 http://www.cuckoobob.com alternate mailto:Bob@cuckoobob.com