DIYAPASON-L Digest #659 - Wednesday, October 2, 2002
 
ANNOUNCEMENT: Institute for Pipe Organ Research and Education
  by "Ed Stauff" <ed@mewsic.com>
Residence Organ Spec
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
RE: Proposed Specification
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Residence Organ Spec
  by "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org>
 

(back) Subject: ANNOUNCEMENT: Institute for Pipe Organ Research and Education From: "Ed Stauff" <ed@mewsic.com> Date: Wed, 2 Oct 2002 08:23:42 -0400   The Institute for Pipe Organ Research and Education, Inc. (IPORE) is a new =   non-profit organization which has been created to fulfill the following missions:   1. To increase, refine and disseminate knowledge of the pipe organ, including its history, construction, literature, and music, for use by scholars, organists, organ builders, organ enthusiasts, and the general public.   2. To make this information freely available via the World Wide Web, as allowed by law and permitted by available funds.   3. To rank among the most complete and most respected on-line sources for information about the pipe organ.   IPORE's first projects will be to sponsor further work on the Encyclopedia =   of Organ Stops at "http://www.organstops.org" (in particular, the addition =   of sound samples), and to establish an XML standard for pipe organ specifications. Other possible projects include a comprehensive Dictionary of the Organ, a comprehensive web site on organ construction for the organ hobbyist, and on-line editions of notable organ literature which has passed into the public domain.   IPORE is run by a board of directors which currently includes Ed Stauff (author of the Encyclopedia of Organ Stops), Peter Rodwell (founder of the =   International Organ Foundation), Sebastian Matth=E4us Gl=FCck = (organbuilder), Peter Storandt, Michael Whitcomb, and Mary Ellen Wessels. We are currently seeking 501(c)(3) status to make us a legally tax-exempt organization.   Visit our web site at: "http://www.ipore.org"     +-------------------------------------------------------+ | IPORE | | Institute for Pipe Organ Research and Education, Inc. | | 23 Rock Bass Lane, Charlotte, VT 05445 | | Edward L. Stauff, President & Treasurer | | 802-425-7322 ed@mewsic.REMOVE_THIS_SPAMGUARD.com | +-------------------------------------------------------+  
(back) Subject: Residence Organ Spec From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 2 Oct 2002 10:28:24 -0500   Robert--Thanks for your suggestion...........just in case, where are you located (with the stopped flute octave)   Roger--Can you define what you mean by "effective?" If you're talking about amount of sound produced, that's a function of the scaling and wind pressures. If you're talking about reverb, it won't be any drier than lots of churches! Those problems could exist whether I had one rank or fifty. Or perhaps you mean something else yet again.   The organ will certainly be a tight squeeze and it will certainly be too loud initially. But that's okay with me because this is a temporary installation. In 2-8 years, I'll be moving it to a larger space in what will presumably be my long term retirement home, Lord willing.   Dennis Steckley   Ich liebe meine Katzen   -----Original Message-----   From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Hi Dennis, Looks impressive and also looks like a ton of work, best of luck with this and keep us informed as to progress and problems.
(back) Subject: RE: Proposed Specification From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 2 Oct 2002 11:40:12 -0500   Thanks, Larry.   The principal chorus (8, 4, 2 2/3, 2) goes on a straight pitman chest. The rest of the organ will be on d-e chests that are much more flexible, but I don't plan much unifying or borrowing. The pedal viola is indeed 44 pipes. Plenty of stop tabs--don't have that in front of me at the moment, but more than the proposed spec I posted requires. For space reasons (and personal choice), I don't want a 3-manual organ.   Everything but the principal chorus (above) will eventually be enclosed, not initially, because this is a temporary installation. I'll move it in 2-10 years to a permanent retirement home, Lord willing.   Dennis Steckley   Ich liebe meine Katzen   -----Original Message----- However, one important consideration may be the type of chests you have, whether they are straight or unit, and how you can arrange them in the areas set aside for the Great and Swell and Pedal divisions. Will the Great (and Pedal?) be enclosed? How many pipes in each rank? (For example, does the Pedal Viola have only 44 pipes, or it is a former manual rank?)   If you could add that info to your posting on DIY-L, that might help show what possibilities exist (or don't!). For example, if you have all straight chests, then no unification or borrowing will be feasible (without modifying the chests). If all of the chests are unit chests, they you have full flexibility for borrows or unification. If you had a 3-manual console, I'd say that you have most of the stuff necessary for a nice (little) 3-manual instrument. What sort of limitation does your current console present (number of stops in each division)?          
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Residence Organ Spec From: "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org> Date: Thu, 3 Oct 2002 10:13:52 +1000     > Roger--Can you define what you mean by "effective?" If you're talking > about amount of sound produced, that's a function of the scaling and > wind pressures.   Though presumably both are to some extent predetermined by the pipework you have acquired.   > If you're talking about reverb, it won't be any drier > than lots of churches!   Well that was what I was wondering - I don't know what space you have. I've certainly heard plenty of residence organs where FAR too much was squashed into a small room, very much to the detriment of the musical sound.   I couldn't, for example, envisage your specification sounding acceptable in the sort of music room I have (see my website)   > Those problems could exist whether I had one > rank or fifty. Or perhaps you mean something else yet again.   It's not a question of loudness per se but of the suitability of that type of sound to a small room.   >In 2-8 years, I'll be moving it to a larger space in what > will presumably be my long term retirement home, Lord willing.   But as you are addressing that issue my question is to a large extent answered. I hope it works out really well for you.   I'm afraid I'm not one of the people with the skills to build an instrument - I guess my question reflects the view of the guy who just tries to play the beast. But I do nevertheless have the feeling that some home builders, in all the fun and frustration of creating their instrument, sometimes forget the musical qualities it should have in the space provided.   -- Regards, Roger   Roger Brown roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org http://rogerbrown.tripod.com http://member.melbpc.org.au/~robrown/