DIYAPASON-L Digest #675 - Sunday, October 27, 2002
 
Re: [Residence Organs]  blower sound deadening
  by "Tony Newnham" <organist@tsnp.fsnet.co.uk>
blower sound deadening
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] blower sound deadening From: "Tony Newnham" <organist@tsnp.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 08:33:48 -0000   Hi   I've seen the acoustic foam used in the blower box on the new(ish) Vincent Woodstock organ at Fotheringhey Church here in the UK. It did a good job, although I thought that box was a little small, and the motor seemed to be more than warm when I went to switch it off after it had been running for about 4 hours. (The switches are inside the box). The blower is = positioned behind the organ, and is only just audible at the console - as a one-time audio engineer, I notice small sounds. The average listener would = probably not notice.   I don't know if there's any advantage in using the sculpted acoustic foam = - it's really designed to control resonances and provide some diffusion in studios. It's probably worth trying a fairly dense standard foam first.   Every Blessing   Tony   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net> To: "Residence Organ List" <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, October 26, 2002 2:57 PM Subject: [Residence Organs] blower sound deadening     | Hi gang, | | I would like to know what the experiences are that any of you have had = in | building a sound-deadening compartment (cover, box) for an organ blower/motor. | | I am interested in reducing the sound of a small blower for two ranks, = and | a large old 1928 Kinetic wood box blower. (Not in the same sound absorbing | compartment.) | | I have looked at some Internet pages from companies that sell such | materials, and see something that looks very much like thick regular = foam | used in chair cushions. | | Are there any benefits to using a specialized material as opposed to = thick | foam pads? | | What about the material used in audio sound chambers? | | Thanks in advance, | | Paul R. Swank | Baltimore, MD. | | | DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own | Residence Pipe Organs. | HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org | List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org | Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org | |    
(back) Subject: blower sound deadening From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 08:04:04 EST     --part1_19a.aa56357.2aed3e44_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   At the Organ Company we construct a plywood box which has a 4-5" clearance =   from the blower itself. We then line the inside of the box with 1" felt = which has an excellent sound deadening quality. Of course, we must cut a hole in =   the bow to allow for the proper amount of wind to enter. One can construct = a light aluminum gate, hinged at the top and designed to swijng inward to = allow air intake and covered with a layer of felt. You would experiment with the =   felt's thickness as you do not want the weight of the felt to impede on = the door's movement.   Hope this helps.   Stan Krider   In a message dated 10/26/2002 11:30:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, Paul R. Swank writes: > > I would like to know what the experiences are that any of you have had = in > building a sound-deadening compartment (cover, box) for an organ > blower/motor. > > I am interested in reducing the sound of a small blower for two ranks, = and > a large old 1928 Kinetic wood box blower. (Not in the same sound = absorbing > > compartment.) > > I have looked at some Internet pages from companies that sell such > materials, and see something that looks very much like thick regular = foam > used in chair cushions. > > Are there any benefits to using a specialized material as opposed to = thick > foam pads? > > What about the material used in audio sound chambers? > --part1_19a.aa56357.2aed3e44_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">At the Organ Company we construct a plywood box = which has a 4-5" clearance from the blower itself. We then line the inside = of the box with 1" felt which has an excellent sound deadening quality. Of = course, we must cut a hole in the bow to allow for the proper amount of = wind to enter. One can construct a light aluminum gate, hinged at the top = and designed to swijng inward to allow air intake and covered with a layer = of felt. You would experiment with the felt's thickness as you do not want = the weight of the felt to impede on the door's movement. <BR> <BR> Hope this helps.<BR> <BR> Stan Krider<BR> <BR> In a message dated 10/26/2002 11:30:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, Paul R. = Swank writes:<BR> <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><BR> I would like to know what the experiences are that any of you have had in = <BR> building a sound-deadening compartment (cover,&nbsp; box) for an organ = blower/motor.<BR> <BR> I am interested in reducing the sound of a small blower for two ranks, and = <BR> a large old 1928 Kinetic wood box blower.&nbsp; (Not in the same sound = absorbing <BR> compartment.)<BR> <BR> I have looked at some Internet pages from companies that sell such <BR> materials, and see something that looks very much like thick regular foam = <BR> used in chair cushions.<BR> <BR> Are there any benefits to using a specialized material as opposed to thick = <BR> foam pads?<BR> <BR> What about the material used in audio sound chambers?<BR> </FONT></HTML> --part1_19a.aa56357.2aed3e44_boundary--