DIYAPASON-L Digest #676 - Monday, October 28, 2002
 
Wind Gauges for Sale
  by "Jane and Dave Whitmore" <JDWhitmore@worldnet.att.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wind Gauges for Sale
  by <gzlmn@iwaynet.net>
Re: Blower Sound Deadening
  by "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wind Gauges for Sale
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
RE: [Residence Organs] wind conductors
  by "STEVE PITTS" <steve.pitts@adtran.com>
wind conductors
  by "Steven Durham" <sdurham11@attbi.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wind Gauges for Sale
  by "Harold Chase" <wa1vvh@net1plus.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wind Gauges for Sale
  by "Jane and Dave Whitmore" <JDWhitmore@worldnet.att.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  wind conductors
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: [Residence Organs]  blower sound deadening
  by "Drew Taylor" <drewt@loritsu.com>
 

(back) Subject: Wind Gauges for Sale From: "Jane and Dave Whitmore" <JDWhitmore@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 08:30:07 -0500   Hi Folks,   I just bought a few brand new Dwyer Magnehelic 0-10" gauges. More than I can use. Drop me a note for details if you're interested in purchasing = one.   Dave in Vermont    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wind Gauges for Sale From: <gzlmn@iwaynet.net> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 09:57:56 -0500   Hello. Please send me info. Have meant to get one, but haven't spent the time to follow it up, so here's my chance! Thanks. Cheers. Paul Gunzelmann Columbus, OH   >Hi Folks, > >I just bought a few brand new Dwyer Magnehelic 0-10" gauges. More >than I can use. Drop me a note for details if you're interested in >purchasing one. > >Dave in Vermont > > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Blower Sound Deadening From: "Dave McClellan" <deep_tremolo@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 10:54:14 -0500   I enclosed my 1-hp Spencer in a box made of 3/4" MDF and lined with carpet =   padding covered by carpet. The base of the box is doubled up with 3/4" plywood for strength.   Photo at http://www.mcclellans.com/images/Organs/blower.jpg   I considered using commercial high-density foam or felt for a liner, but these are very expensive alternatives.   The reservoir is directly on top of the enclosure, linked with a rubber cloth sleeve through a hole in the top of the enclosure. The cloth is = also wrapped with carpeting between the enclosure and reservoir. The whole assembly is on castors in my "erecting room". A panel on the enclosure = can be removed to service the blower. The inside dimension is just large = enough to enclose the turbine housing, which leaves plenty of clearance around = the motor. In my case, the blower is never run more than 1-2 hours, and my 10 =   rank instrument does not tax it that much. I say this because in my case there is no ventilation provided for the motor. I have felt the motor = after use, and it is only warm - not hot. Ideally, there would be powered ventilation for the blower motor, but that would obviously greatly complicate construction.   The blower sits on about 1.5" of felt padding. It is not attached to the housing.   There is a U-shaped baffle for air intake on one end - with inlet and = outlet openings to the top. This baffle is also lined on all sides with = carpeting. There is about 2" of clearance in the U-shaped windway. There is no "flap" in my case. The opening is stuffed with furnace filter material to =   cut down on dust and dirt.   Even though right next to the pipework, the noise is not objectionable.   Dave         _________________________________________________________________ Surf the Web without missing calls! Get MSN Broadband. http://resourcecenter.msn.com/access/plans/freeactivation.asp    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wind Gauges for Sale From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 12:04:34 EST     --part1_16f.16413da9.2aeec822_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Dave,   I'm interested in a pressure guage. How much?   Keith   --part1_16f.16413da9.2aeec822_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Dave, <BR> <BR>I'm interested in a pressure guage. &nbsp;How much? <BR> <BR>Keith</FONT></HTML>   --part1_16f.16413da9.2aeec822_boundary--  
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] wind conductors From: "STEVE PITTS" <steve.pitts@adtran.com> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 11:45:01 -0600   This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C27EA9.BD713140 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   I need to connect a blower to a reservoir using about 30 ft of 10" dia = wind conductor. All the chests need about 5" pressure. I am at a loss as = to the cheapest yet most practical means to do this. I have seen the = Flexaust product in the OSI catalogue but it is very expensive....about = $400 for 30 ft.The original organ installation was fitted with a heavy = metal conduit.Unfortunately, I did not save enough from the removal to = use in my current installation and I have no idea where to get the stuff = ...I am curious what other residence organ builders and/or professionals = might recommend. I am guessing that air conditioning duct and the like are = not appropriate. Of course, if I have to , I just get the Flexaust which = would probably be easier to work with than metal. thanks Steve Pitts Ardmore Tennessee       ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C27EA9.BD713140 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1"   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Diso-8859-1">     <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.50.4616.200" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial color=3D#0000ff><SPAN class=3D340423717-28102002>I = need to connect a blower to a reservoir using about 30 ft of 10" dia wind = conductor. All the chests need about 5" pressure. I am at a loss as to the cheapest yet = most practical means to do this. I have seen the Flexaust&nbsp;product in the = OSI catalogue but it is very expensive....about $400 for 30 ft.The original = organ installation was fitted with a heavy metal conduit.Unfortunately, I = &nbsp;did not save enough from the removal to use in my current installation and I = have no idea where to get the stuff ...I am curious what other residence organ = builders and/or professionals might recommend. I am guessing that air conditioning = duct and the like&nbsp;are not appropriate. Of course, if I have to , I just = get the Flexaust which would probably be easier to work with than metal.</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial color=3D#0000ff><SPAN class=3D340423717-28102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial color=3D#0000ff><SPAN class=3D340423717-28102002></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial color=3D#0000ff><SPAN class=3D340423717-28102002>thanks</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial color=3D#0000ff><SPAN = class=3D340423717-28102002>Steve Pitts</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial color=3D#0000ff><SPAN = class=3D340423717-28102002>Ardmore Tennessee</SPAN></FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE><FONT face=3DArial color=3D#0000ff size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------_=3D_NextPart_001_01C27EA9.BD713140--  
(back) Subject: wind conductors From: "Steven Durham" <sdurham11@attbi.com> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 10:52:15 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)   Steve:   You can use galvanized metal heating duct and joints for your project. However, you must solder the joints to make them air tight. Several years ago I used metal heating duct on an organ project and used clear silicone caulking instead of soldering to seal the joints. It was fine for awhile but it slowly deteriorated and I had wind leaks everywhere. That is why I recommend soldering as it is the professional way to do it and is relatively east. It requires getting a professional soldering iron made for this purpose (contact a sheet metal supply house).   Of course when all is said and done and you've purchased all the metal and soldering supplies, you might be better off just buying the flexaust from OSI and be done with it The great thing about flexduct is that it is easy to install and is free of leaks. It also can be easily dismantled if needed You might also want to contact a local heating & air conditioning supply house and see what types of flex ducts they use. A friend of mine got this 10" non-insulated gray flex duct for his pipe organ and it is much cheaper than OSI and holds the wind at 15" WP just fine. He purchased it a few years ago from Gensco http://www.gensco.com/home.html . I'm sure there are other companies out there who sell the same product.   If all else fails, I would recommend contacting any local organ builders to see if they have any surplus flexaust. This is probably a long shot but you never know. I hope this information is helpful.   Steven Durham Portland, OR   -------Original Message-------   From: Residence Organ List Date: Monday, October 28, 2002 9:45:12 AM To: 'Residence Organ List' Subject: [Residence Organs] RE: [Residence Organs] wind conductors   I need to connect a blower to a reservoir using about 30 ft of 10" dia wind conductor. All the chests need about 5" pressure. I am at a loss as to the cheapest yet most practical means to do this. I have seen the Flexaust product in the OSI catalogue but it is very expensive....about $400 for 30 ft.The original organ installation was fitted with a heavy metal conduit Unfortunately, I did not save enough from the removal to use in my current installation and I have no idea where to get the stuff ...I am curious what other residence organ builders and/or professionals might recommend. I am guessing that air conditioning duct and the like are not appropriate. Of course, if I have to , I just get the Flexaust which would probably be easier to work with than metal.     thanks Steve Pitts Ardmore Tennessee  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wind Gauges for Sale From: "Harold Chase" <wa1vvh@net1plus.com> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 19:39:38 -0500   I might be interested -- how big is this thing, and how much do you want for one? Thanks!     Harry Chase             ----- Original Message ----- From: Jane and Dave Whitmore <JDWhitmore@worldnet.att.net> To: Residence Organ List <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, October 28, 2002 8:30 AM Subject: [Residence Organs] Wind Gauges for Sale     > Hi Folks, > > I just bought a few brand new Dwyer Magnehelic 0-10" gauges. More than I > can use. Drop me a note for details if you're interested in purchasing one. > > Dave in Vermont > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wind Gauges for Sale From: "Jane and Dave Whitmore" <JDWhitmore@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 20:47:54 -0500   At 07:39 PM 10/28/02 -0500, you wrote: >I might be interested -- how big is this thing, and how much do you want >for one? Thanks! > > >Harry Chase   Just a note for Harry and everyone else: the wind gauges have all been spoken for. Thanks to everyone for your interest and sorry to tie up bandwidth with a commercial.   Dave in Vermont    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] wind conductors From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 20:59:00 -0800   >Steve: > >You can use galvanized metal heating duct and joints for your project. >However, you must solder the joints to make them air tight. Several = years >ago I used metal heating duct on an organ project and used clear silicone >caulking instead of soldering to seal the joints. It was fine for awhile >but it slowly deteriorated and I had wind leaks everywhere.   I agree and disagree.   We had to do a 30 ft run of 12" duct. We used 10 3ft sections. In an old theater I could not see using a torch. So our local heating supplier sold us a prduct made by "Durodyne" . It consists of cartridges of a sealer and thin fiber glass tape. First you smear the sealer over all joints and then embed the tape into it. Add more sealer and make it as smooth as you can. It sets up rock hard and is rated for pressures much higher than you ever encounter in an organ. We painted the duct grey and while not as "pretty" as soldered joints, it has lasted unaltered for over 10 years already.   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] blower sound deadening From: "Drew Taylor" <drewt@loritsu.com> Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 23:48:49 -0500   We just recently built a blower box for a Laukhuff that is to be placed in = a small tracker instrument. We built the box with rather thick wood and = lined it with the spiked foam material that's sometimes used as shipping padding = (only more durable in our application).   The incoming air has to follow a path through two slats of wood and gets = drawn across the motor of the blower to cool it on its way into the blower's = intake. The blower then pressurizes another sound insulated section of the box, = air then is free to enter the reservoir.     -Drew Taylor John Farmer Organ Builders. Winston Salem, NC         10/28/02 00:30:01, "Residence Organ List" <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> = wrote:   >DIYAPASON-L Digest #675 - Sunday, October 27, 2002 > > Re: [Residence Organs] blower sound deadening > by "Tony Newnham" <organist@tsnp.fsnet.co.uk> > blower sound deadening > by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] blower sound deadening >From: "Tony Newnham" <organist@tsnp.fsnet.co.uk> >Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 08:33:48 -0000 > >Hi > >I've seen the acoustic foam used in the blower box on the new(ish) = Vincent >Woodstock organ at Fotheringhey Church here in the UK. It did a good = job, >although I thought that box was a little small, and the motor seemed to = be >more than warm when I went to switch it off after it had been running for >about 4 hours. (The switches are inside the box). The blower is = positioned >behind the organ, and is only just audible at the console - as a one-time >audio engineer, I notice small sounds. The average listener would = probably >not notice. > >I don't know if there's any advantage in using the sculpted acoustic foam = - >it's really designed to control resonances and provide some diffusion in >studios. It's probably worth trying a fairly dense standard foam first. > >Every Blessing > >Tony > >----- Original Message ----- >From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@surfbest.net> >To: "Residence Organ List" <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> >Sent: Saturday, October 26, 2002 2:57 PM >Subject: [Residence Organs] blower sound deadening > > >| Hi gang, >| >| I would like to know what the experiences are that any of you have had = in >| building a sound-deadening compartment (cover, box) for an organ >blower/motor. >| >| I am interested in reducing the sound of a small blower for two ranks, = and >| a large old 1928 Kinetic wood box blower. (Not in the same sound >absorbing >| compartment.) >| >| I have looked at some Internet pages from companies that sell such >| materials, and see something that looks very much like thick regular = foam >| used in chair cushions. >| >| Are there any benefits to using a specialized material as opposed to = thick >| foam pads? >| >| What about the material used in audio sound chambers? >| >| Thanks in advance, >| >| Paul R. Swank >| Baltimore, MD. >| >| >| DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own >| Residence Pipe Organs. >| HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >| List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >| Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >| >| > > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Subject: blower sound deadening >From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> >Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 08:04:04 EST > > >--part1_19a.aa56357.2aed3e44_boundary >Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" >Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit > >At the Organ Company we construct a plywood box which has a 4-5" = clearance >from the blower itself. We then line the inside of the box with 1" felt = which >has an excellent sound deadening quality. Of course, we must cut a hole = in >the bow to allow for the proper amount of wind to enter. One can = construct a >light aluminum gate, hinged at the top and designed to swijng inward to = allow >air intake and covered with a layer of felt. You would experiment with = the >felt's thickness as you do not want the weight of the felt to impede on the >door's movement. > >Hope this helps. > >Stan Krider > >In a message dated 10/26/2002 11:30:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, Paul R. >Swank writes: >> >> I would like to know what the experiences are that any of you have had = in >> building a sound-deadening compartment (cover, box) for an organ >> blower/motor. >> >> I am interested in reducing the sound of a small blower for two ranks, = and >> a large old 1928 Kinetic wood box blower. (Not in the same sound = absorbing >> >> compartment.) >> >> I have looked at some Internet pages from companies that sell such >> materials, and see something that looks very much like thick regular = foam >> used in chair cushions. >> >> Are there any benefits to using a specialized material as opposed to = thick >> foam pads? >> >> What about the material used in audio sound chambers? >> >--part1_19a.aa56357.2aed3e44_boundary >Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" >Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit > ><HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">At the Organ Company we construct a plywood box which has a = 4-5" clearance from the blower itself. We then line the inside of the box with = 1" felt which has an excellent sound deadening quality. Of course, we must = cut a hole in the bow to allow for the proper amount of wind to enter. One can construct a light aluminum gate, hinged at the top and designed to swijng = inward to allow air intake and covered with a layer of felt. You would experiment = with the felt's thickness as you do not want the weight of the felt to impede = on the door's movement. <BR> ><BR> >Hope this helps.<BR> ><BR> >Stan Krider<BR> ><BR> >In a message dated 10/26/2002 11:30:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, Paul R. = Swank writes:<BR> ><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><BR> >I would like to know what the experiences are that any of you have had in = <BR> >building a sound-deadening compartment (cover,&nbsp; box) for an organ blower/motor.<BR> ><BR> >I am interested in reducing the sound of a small blower for two ranks, = and <BR> >a large old 1928 Kinetic wood box blower.&nbsp; (Not in the same sound absorbing <BR> >compartment.)<BR> ><BR> >I have looked at some Internet pages from companies that sell such <BR> >materials, and see something that looks very much like thick regular foam = <BR> >used in chair cushions.<BR> ><BR> >Are there any benefits to using a specialized material as opposed to = thick <BR> >foam pads?<BR> ><BR> >What about the material used in audio sound chambers?<BR> ></FONT></HTML> >--part1_19a.aa56357.2aed3e44_boundary-- > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- >End of DIYAPASON-L Digest > >DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own = Residence Pipe Organs. >HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org >List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org > >