DIYAPASON-L Digest #637 - Wednesday, September 4, 2002
 
Poplar - Toe board?
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Poplar - Toe board?
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Re: Drilling the Toeboard...
  by <TheGluePot@aol.com>
MIDI Options
  by "Drew Taylor" <drewt@loritsu.com>
 

(back) Subject: Poplar - Toe board? From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Sep 2002 01:41:48 EDT   Dennis:   Poplar is your best choice and as I stated use quartersawn kiln dried at = 8% or less. If the wood is not checked and the moisture measured you will = get bows, splits, twists, cups, and crooks as it dries. Also look for sap pockets. Since most trees are about 90+% water when cut down, the wood really needs to be properly dried and dressed by the supplier so s4s is = the easiest way to spot problems. This select grade is expensive but then in = the long run it is worth it. If you can choose from a large selection of = boards, have a moisture meter, and a kiln at home then you can avoid most of the problems. For the less experienced the dimensionally stabile plywood is = the better choice since the plywood is laminated at optimum conditions.   Best of luck,   Al Sefl An old dried out thing himself...  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Poplar - Toe board? From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Sep 2002 10:28:01 EDT   The lumber place is Baker Hardwood. I will ask about the kiln drying. It = has been suggested to make the top in two pieces each 11" wide and 8' long, = any thoughts? When you drill toe holes in 5 quarter wood you can plane out the splinter side, what do you do with plywood? I can plane up to 12." I don't take the best pictures buuuuuuutttttt an album of how you spent = your fall, about the chest building would be neat to have.We'll see :) Thank again for the help. Dennis = .    
(back) Subject: Re: Drilling the Toeboard... From: <TheGluePot@aol.com> Date: Wed, 4 Sep 2002 14:08:27 EDT   << The lumber place is Baker Hardwood. I will ask about the kiln drying. = It has been suggested to make the top in two pieces each 11" wide and 8' long, = any thoughts? When you drill toe holes in 5 quarter wood you can plane out the splinter =   side, what do you do with plywood? I can plane up to 12." I don't take the best pictures buuuuuuutttttt an album of how you spent = your fall, about the chest building would be neat to have.We'll see :) Thank again for the help. Dennis >>   Dennis:   I cannot stress enough about having solid lumber at 8% or less moisture so = it is dimensionally stabilized *before* you start to work with it. As for = two joining two pieces together, this is OK and might save you big money. A moisture meter is a vital tool in organ building and they are not = expensive considering the extra work involved when having to rework major = construction.   When drilling holes in all woods you can stop the splintering with three things. #1 - have your drills as sharp as you can get them. #2 - put a quality masking tape on the opposite side to prevent splintering. AND #3 = - use a cheap backer board that is clamped tight under the wood you are drilling. This way the bit goes down easily and cleanly with no = splinters. The sharp drill bit means less force is needed, the masking tape = reinforces the wood being drilled, and the backer board keeps any downward bit force from breaking out splinters. The setup is a bit longer but then you have = no extra surface planning to do when you are finished.   Al Sefl  
(back) Subject: MIDI Options From: "Drew Taylor" <drewt@loritsu.com> Date: Wed, 04 Sep 2002 22:40:14 -0400   I have been giving some thought to adding MIDI support to a small organ I = am still (still) in the process of building. What I mean by MIDI support is = taking the MIDI output of a computer and simply operating valves, shades, stops = etc. I don't need any MIDI input, so a simple output driver board should work = fine.   For changing stops and working the expression shades I figure I can map = those to notes on the output board then edit the MIDI files to turn those specific = notes on and off.   My real question is, what is the best option for buying an output board? = The only ones I have seen for sale is at JW Electronics (www.j-omega.co.uk). = Is JW the only maker of these? I figure it would be easier to buy a ready made = board rather than programming a PIC IC and building one (although that is an = option).   I figure it would cost a little over $200 for 2 boards, one 64-note board = for the main input and one smaller board for working stops and etc. I would = have to combine MIDI channels on the software side in order to feed them into the = single main board, then the control data can be split into another channel to be = sent to the control board.     Best wishes!       -Drew Taylor