DIYAPASON-L Digest #929 - Thursday, December 4, 2003
 
coiled wire connections for electomechanical action valves -question
  by "H Chase" <wa1vvh@net1plus.com>
Re: coiled wire connections for electomechanical  action valves -question
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  coiled wire connections for electomechanical acti
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  coiled wire connections for  electomechanical act
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  coiled wire connections for electomechanical acti
  by "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
 

(back) Subject: coiled wire connections for electomechanical action valves -question From: "H Chase" <wa1vvh@net1plus.com> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 14:35:23 -0800   Does anyone know why the wiring to the Reisner 601 ( or other similar) = valves always seems to have a tightly coiled section of wire as it goes = from the wire bundle on the toeboard to the valve contact? Is = this just for fatigue/vibration immunity, or is there anything being = accomplished by the inductance of these coils when the valve is = triggered? I am about to wire up a lot of Reisner 601's and = I need to know how important this is, thanks!       Harry Chase          
(back) Subject: Re: coiled wire connections for electomechanical action valves -question From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 14:40:50 -0500   Harry Chase asked about the coiled "pigtails" on Reisner 601s. They serve several purposes:   1. The do provide some relief from vibration-induced fatigue. 2. They give some slack in case you have to removed a unit from the chest. 3. They look neat and tidy!   If you are wiring to 601s using a telephone-type cable (24ga solid twisted pair cable), then you can just cut each wire a bit long, strip the portion to be soldered, and then neatly wrap the wire around a dowel or other form. Then pull it out slightly longer than needed to reach the terminal on the 601, so that when you solder it there is no tension.   (These hints were presented in the AIO video-taped lecture given by organbuiler Chuck Kegg.)   When stripping that sort of wire, you can use gauge-specific strippers; I like to use a thermal stripper, whose hot blade cuts the insulation = without danger of nicking the conductor. Digi-key lists them, as to other = suppliers   Larry Chace (just back in from the shop, where wiring is today's activity) =          
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] coiled wire connections for electomechanical action v... From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 14:45:10 EST   Harry-- Far as I have ever known in over 50 years of working with this stuff, =   the coil is just to neaten up the wire, which is supplied extra long, the manufacturer not knowing what the exact distance is between magnet base = and pin or soldered connection. "In the old days" many replacable items with wires = were so treated with a coil wound from the "extra" wire so to speak. Hope this helps you, good luck with the project. ---Roc    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] coiled wire connections for electomechanical action valves -question From: "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 11:57:48 -0800   As far as I know, it's just vibration protection.     At 02:35 PM 12/4/2003, H Chase wrote: >Does anyone know why the wiring to the Reisner 601 ( or other >similar) valves always seems to have a tightly coiled section of wire as =   >it goes from the wire bundle on the toeboard to the valve >contact? Is this just for fatigue/vibration immunity, or is >there anything being accomplished by the inductance of these coils when >the valve is triggered? I am about to wire up a lot of Reisner =   >601's and I need to know how important this is, thanks! > >Harry Chase   Regards, Bob   http://home.jps.net/~rrloesch/index.htm      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] coiled wire connections for electomechanical action valves -question From: "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 23:48:12 -0500   The wire is coiled for two very important reasons One is to allow you to = remove the valve without unsoldering it and the other is the fact that = the coils vibrate and move a bit as they operate.(you will notice that = most electromagnets are dipped in varnish to prevent the coils from = vibrating and wearing against themselves- that's why old worn out = transformers tend to hum) If you use a straight solid wire to link the = leads to the coil you will find they will snap off in time. I have an = organ built in the 1960's that contains 1600 Reisner valves. The = organbuilder used short leads and a solid feed wire to the coils and = just soldered the wires on without wrapping them. Needless to say I = spend a horrible amount of time soldering them back on all the time - = while in the most uncomfortable of spots. Hot solder on your face is = not fun :-))   Some folks also ask if wires should be soldered or not. I know that in = modern telephone work the wires are not soldered any more due to = corrosion problems.=20 Solder joints exposed to excessive moisture and heat/cold as you find in = outdoor phone lines do not work well as the two metals do not expand = and contract equally and the moisture combined with electricity causes = the metals to corrode. This leads to problems on phone lines outdoors. = Indoors however I've found that time and exposure to air causes more = problems to wire wrapped connections than soldered ones do.   So if you are building an outdoor organ go with wire wrap;. Indoors go = with soldered connections :-))   Nelson Denton R.A. Denton & Son Pipe Organ Builders.       --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.547 / Virus Database: 340 - Release Date: 02-Dec-03