DIYAPASON-L Digest #931 - Monday, December 15, 2003
 
RE: [Residence Organs]  tuning question
  by "STEVE PITTS" <steve.pitts@adtran.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  tuning question
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
RE: [Residence Organs]  tuning question
  by "STEVE PITTS" <steve.pitts@adtran.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  tuning question
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] tuning question From: "STEVE PITTS" <steve.pitts@adtran.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 14:27:31 -0600       List:   My 3M/17 rank home organ has a 1 1/3 quint stop on the great division. This is the last remaining rank that I need to tune with my Korg CA-30 tuner (which I heard about from the list). I am under the impression that the Quint stop is a mutation and that mutations are tuned in a different manner than say a 2 ft principal. I have noticed that the lowest pitched pipe in this rank is stamped "C 1 1/3 quint" which makes me think I just tune this rank as though it is 1 ft principal. Could someone out there shed some light on this?   P.S. even though I have a hard time picturing professional organ builders using a $20 device to tune organs, my organ has benefited tremendously from the Korg CA-30. best $20 I have spent   Steve Pitts Ardmore Tennessee        
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] tuning question From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 16:10:01 -0500   Steve Pitts <steve.pitts@adtran.com> asked about tuning his 1-1/3' Quint.   The low pipe, marked "C" because it plays from the C key, sounds G, a perfect fifth above a 2' stop. This is one case where the handy little Korg tuner won't be of much help! Well, maybe...   You could tune the Quint using the Korg, remembering that the C key will sound a G, and so on. When you are done, the Quint will be slightly flat of its proper pitch, because the Korg will give you a G that is well-tempered relative to C.   Now turn off the Korg tuner, turn on the 2' Fifteenth and 1-1/3' Quint and play G. You'll hear a slight beat, one or two or three per second. Tune the Quint pipe ever so slightly sharp, until the beat is gone. Now move = on to the next note (probably C# or D) and continue throughout the bottom octave. If you can hear these slow beats and can tune them away, then continue. If not, after you've finished at least the bottom octave, turn off the Fifteenth and proceed to tune in octaves on the Quint alone. = Check from time to time with the Fifteenth to make sure that the fifth is a perfect (beatless) fifth and not a termpered (slowly beating) fifth.   You might follow a similar approach when tuning a mixture; first, get one of the unison ranks in tune and then proceed to tune the fifths beatless.   Happy tuning!   Larry Chace        
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] tuning question From: "STEVE PITTS" <steve.pitts@adtran.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 15:33:42 -0600       -----Original Message----- From: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org [mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Larry Chace Sent: Monday, December 15, 2003 3:10 PM To: Residence Organ List Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] tuning question     Steve Pitts <steve.pitts@adtran.com> asked about tuning his 1-1/3' Quint.   The low pipe, marked "C" because it plays from the C key, sounds G, a perfect fifth above a 2' stop. This is one case where the handy little Korg tuner won't be of much help! Well, maybe...   You could tune the Quint using the Korg, remembering that the C key will sound a G, and so on. When you are done, the Quint will be slightly flat of its proper pitch, because the Korg will give you a G that is well-tempered relative to C.   Now turn off the Korg tuner, turn on the 2' Fifteenth and 1-1/3' Quint and play G. You'll hear a slight beat, one or two or three per second. Tune the Quint pipe ever so slightly sharp, until the beat is gone. Now move = on to the next note (probably C# or D) and continue throughout the bottom octave. If you can hear these slow beats and can tune them away, then continue. If not, after you've finished at least the bottom octave, turn off the Fifteenth and proceed to tune in octaves on the Quint alone. = Check from time to time with the Fifteenth to make sure that the fifth is a perfect (beatless) fifth and not a termpered (slowly beating) fifth.   You might follow a similar approach when tuning a mixture; first, get one of the unison ranks in tune and then proceed to tune the fifths beatless.   Happy tuning!   Larry Chace       DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own Residence Pipe Organs. HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] tuning question From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 19:35:23 EST   Steve, you need to tune by ear rather than use the Korg. Otherwise, you'll =   have the same result as if the 1-1/3 was a unified rank. Tune a pure fifth =   against a 2' stop until the beat is gone.   Tom Old Hickory, TN