DIYAPASON-L Digest #841 - Wednesday, July 2, 2003
 
Wurlitzer #2051 Larsen/Crawford recordings
  by "Tim Rickman" <tim@uniflex.com>
Re: Wurlitzer #2051 Larsen/Crawford recordings
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
[Residence Organs]  Re: Wurlitzer #2051 Larsen/Crawford recordings
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
 

(back) Subject: Wurlitzer #2051 Larsen/Crawford recordings From: "Tim Rickman" <tim@uniflex.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2003 04:57:24 -0700   --CPLiqxeBMiidXqUGTnXeRPGUlbA Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit     Subject: Wurlitzer #2051 From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2003 08:42:55 -0400   Tim Rickman mentioned that the 3/12 Wurlitzer I visited recently.... <snip> One of the most interesting events during the visit was the playing of the organ by Lyn Larsen, who, though not physically present, was there in the form of some performances that had been recorded via the Uniflex's = built-in performance record/playback feature. As I understand it, and I might be confused, some of these pieces were original Jesse Crawford compositions, perhaps even originally played on this very instrument when it was installed at the Wurlitzer factory. Tim may have had to do some re-arranging of the registrations, since the current specification is = quite expanded compared to the original. At any rate, the performances were = very fine, indeed! (Tim, can you tell us more about these recordings?) <snip> Larry Chace   Hi, Larry and List. Larry Chace Asked about the Lyn Larsen / Crawford Performance on this interesting home installation. I'm pleased you asked about this, but as usual my reply will probably be a bit lengthy, because there are a lot of interesting things about this particular organ and it's installation.   As we know, many organ enthusiasts and residential pipe organ owners, for what ever reason often own, but can't play these instruments. As is the case = with this particular installation, the owner of the instrument does not, himself = play, but wanted to have the organ "play itself" and if possible obtain and play = some of the more famous original paper organ rolls that were originally = recorded on this instrument when it was installed in the Wurlitzer factory.   There is quite a history on this unique Wurlitzer organ console, and its present owner is very fortunate to have this console in his possession, as it is a "one of a kind", both in case work, and especially the special engravings easily seen on the ivory key tops by the informed or casual viewer. These engravings were put on the key tops so the organist would know where to play and NOT play when some of the special key ranges of the three keyboards were altered when making recordings.   Small circular engravings on the key faces (similar to the chamber = indicator circle, rings, and dotted rings Wurlitzer used above the stop keys) showed the organist the key ranges of each keyboard when division and percussion stops were selected, BUT when the Solo manual was used in the recording process, certain keys would be borrowed from the Accompaniment and Great manuals, reducing the key ranges of those keyboards while the borrowed = keys would create a temporary "transposed" Solo keyboard of 37 notes. So, like most other roll player organs of the day, the player was basically a 2 manual organ console that borrowed the lower and upper octaves of the = Great and Accompaniment keyboard to make up a 37 note Solo keyboard when needed for things like Chimes, Chrysoglott Arpeggios, Reed accents and of course, SOLO Tibia combinations. It was quite exciting to see this console up = close and personal, as I have been working on this Wurlitzer roll player format off and on for many years in an attempt to make these rolls available in a variety of system formats so they can be enjoyed by those who have modern day performance players wired to their organs.   Since the organ rolls that were produced on this instrument had to be manageable, the roll was set to a rather wide fixed width of 16-7/8" wide and contained only 165 in-line holes spaced at 4 holes per cm. The organ specification was 3-manuals, Pedal board, two expression pedals = controlling 12 swell shutters and 80 Stops controlling 13 to 15 ranks plus three tuned percussions (Glock, Xylo, Chrysoglott) and the standard Wurlitzer "toy counter".   One can easily see that by counting keys, stops, and controls, the result adds up to a lot more than the 165 holes available on the roll, so some note ranges had to cut down and some cleaver switching arrangements had to be employed, but we won't go there today ;-)   The Chamber pipework associated with this installation is almost all Wurlitzer, but is not the original pipe work that was installed with this console when it was used for roll recording organ at the factory. The console was separated from the original Factory organ and sent to Los Angeles to be installed in a Wurlitzer Retail store, in a showroom (I believe) above the Ambassador Theatre where it was merged with it's = existing pipe work and re-assigned its present opus number 2051. Sorry, I don't = have any date history when all of this relocation occurred, or why the console was divorced from the original recording organ.   The performance Larry heard during his visit was an original (licensed) recording made for the UniFlex System by Lyn Larsen and is the first in a series of professional artists series of discs to be made available to our = residential organ system owners, and hopefully someday they can also be translated = into other system formats. Hopefully Lyn, when he can find the time can do = more of these, as they have been received extremely well by our customers, and are a pleasure to listen to again and again.   The tune selections and the registrations were selected by Lyn = specifically for the Theatre Organ that would be found today, in most residential installations. The modern day analogy of Lyn's recording relates directly to origin of this particular organ. It too was used to make self playing "residential" organ rolls for home installations in "those" days, = featuring well known professional artists at the console, such as Jesse Crawford, = most notably. There are several Crawford selections on Lyn's disc that mimic = the Crawford style of playing to a point where you can't really tell if it is Lyn or a hand played Wurlitzer Crawford ROLL playing, but the recording is Lyn's work entirely.   Since Larry has had mentioned he was not sure if the playback was Lyn OR a hand played Wurlitzer Crawford made on that console, one of our ongoing projects, and now for the owner of this instrument, since this organ has resurfaced, is to re-record ALL of paper rolls made from hand played performances on this organ console while it was at the Wurlitzer Factory. The plan is to translate the roll information and export this performance data into different "file" formats that can hopefully be set up and configured to play on many of the different organ performance playback systems, including the record/playback system Larry Chace has designed for the Z-Tronics system.   Translating this information is relatively easy for the UniFlex system as the system can be programmed to manage and load multiple organ profiles or "personalities". This means that it has the ability to allow the organ specification as the organ stands where installed, but it also has the ability to allow the importation of "other organ specifications" that may larger or smaller than the customers organ PLAY that organ. By = re-defining or re-addressing the pipe chamber magnet outputs with the system = definition editor to the "other organ" wiring specifications, recordings made on one = or a dozen different organs can easily play on the customers organ installation.   The Larsen recording that Larry heard was originally recorded on a much larger console with a completely different specification than the organ it was played on. Lyn was careful in his selection of stops and kept the registration limited to the ranks that would be found in the typical residence organ installation. What Larry heard playing was a completely different console specification that was "personalized" to play this particular installation's PIPE Chamber Output boards. All I did was take the original recording organ specification (definition file) and simply re-address the pipe chamber outputs from the original organ definition TO the pipe chamber addresses of the CURRENT installation. This is something that takes about an hour to three hours to do, depending on the size of = the organ. Once this is done additional recordings made on the "other" organ can be played on other organs that have had the chamber output addresses translated. If the playback organ is missing some of the ranks used on the original recording organ, we simply substitute what ever rank comes = closest in sound and power level to the rank(s) used on the original recording = organ and program the rank output addresses as best we can.   The Wurlitzer ROLL translation project we are working on is very similar. The rolls may be played on either the original Wurlitzer Roll Player mechanism, or as we are planning, optically scanned and converted to a usable raw midi note-on, note-off format. From there, a software = simulated player "relay" will take the raw roll data and process it, converting it into a format similar to what you would expect from an organ console, division note data, stop data and expression data. At this point, the = rolls are now in a usable format that can be further translated into performance data that could be used for many of the different relay record/play = systems and then released.   The major obstacle in all of this for "general consumption" is how the = Stops are controlled, and how those stops would be interpreted on the organ playing back the files on all the different systems that exist out there, since MOST hardware based playback systems are uniquely wired, and not standardized from organ to organ. Some compatibility issues for different systems may be handled with keyboard and stop re-mapping, depending on the method used for turning stops on and off, but there are still some = problems yet to figure out.   Allen Organs and I believe the Peterson Performance player systems use a "Master Stop List" where Stops, couplers and keys are assigned permanent handlers and locations, so no matter how the playback device is wired, the stops SHOULD match up and be able to be controlled. This approach is much easier to work with, so those who own Allen Organs my see these rolls available before some of the pipe organ systems do, IF we can ever get = this translation program started! There just aren't enough hours in the day!   While some obstacles have yet to be overcome in the translation organ = rolls into the different performance player formats, our mission of re-recording and making these rare rolls available to those who simply cannot have or afford expensive roll libraries and original players is the ultimate goal = of this project. Hopefully we will be able to accomplish this in the near future.   Sorry to have gone on so long.   Tim     --CPLiqxeBMiidXqUGTnXeRPGUlbA Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <html><body bgcolor=3D"white"> <br> Subject: Wurlitzer #2051<br> From: "Larry Chace" &lt;<a = href=3D"mailto:RLC1@etnainstruments.com">RLC1@etnainstruments.com</a>&gt;<b= r> Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2003 08:42:55 -0400<br> <br> Tim Rickman mentioned that the 3/12 Wurlitzer I visited recently....<br> &lt;snip&gt;<br> One of the most interesting events during the visit was the playing of = the<br> organ by Lyn Larsen, who, though not physically present, was there in = the<br> form of some performances that had been recorded via the Uniflex's = built-in<br> performance record/playback feature. As I understand it, and I might = be<br> confused, some of these pieces were original Jesse Crawford = compositions,<br> perhaps even originally played on this very instrument when it was<br> installed at the Wurlitzer factory. Tim may have had to do some<br> re-arranging of the registrations, since the current specification is = quite<br> expanded compared to the original. At any rate, the performances were = very<br> fine, indeed! (Tim, can you tell us more about these recordings?)<br> &lt;snip&gt;<br> Larry Chace<br> <br> Hi, Larry and List.<br> Larry Chace Asked about the Lyn Larsen / Crawford Performance on<br> this interesting home installation. I'm pleased you asked about this, but<br> as usual<br> my reply will probably be a bit lengthy, because there are a lot of<br> interesting things<br> about this particular organ and it's installation.<br> <br> As we know, many organ enthusiasts and residential pipe organ owners, = for<br> what<br> ever reason often own, but can't play these instruments. As is the case = with<br> this<br> particular installation, the owner of the instrument does not, himself = play,<br> but<br> wanted to have the organ "play itself" and if possible obtain and play = some<br> of the more famous original paper organ rolls that were originally = recorded<br> on this instrument when it was installed in the Wurlitzer factory.<br> <br> There is quite a history on this unique Wurlitzer organ console, and = its<br> present owner is very fortunate to have this console in his possession, = as<br> it is a "one of a kind", both in case work, and especially the special<br> engravings easily seen on the ivory key tops by the informed or casual<br> viewer. These engravings were put on the key tops so the organist = would<br> know where to play and NOT play when some of the special key ranges of = the<br> three keyboards were altered when making recordings.<br> <br> Small circular engravings on the key faces (similar to the chamber = indicator<br> circle, rings, and dotted rings Wurlitzer used above the stop keys) = showed<br> the organist the key ranges of each keyboard when division and = percussion<br> stops were selected, BUT when the Solo manual was used in the = recording<br> process, certain keys would be borrowed from the Accompaniment and = Great<br> manuals, reducing the key ranges of those keyboards while the borrowed = keys<br> would create a temporary "transposed" Solo keyboard of 37 notes. So, = like<br> most other roll player organs of the day, the player was basically a 2<br> manual organ console that borrowed the lower and upper octaves of the = Great<br> and Accompaniment keyboard to make up a 37 note Solo keyboard when = needed<br> for things like Chimes, Chrysoglott Arpeggios, Reed accents and of = course,<br> SOLO Tibia combinations. It was quite exciting to see this console up = close<br> and personal, as I have been working on this Wurlitzer roll player = format<br> off and on for many years in an attempt to make these rolls available in = a<br> variety of system formats so they can be enjoyed by those who have = modern<br> day performance players wired to their organs.<br> <br> Since the organ rolls that were produced on this instrument had to be<br> manageable, the roll was set to a rather wide fixed width of 16-7/8" = wide<br> and contained only 165 in-line holes spaced at 4 holes per cm. The = organ<br> specification was 3-manuals, Pedal board, two expression pedals = controlling<br> 12 swell shutters and 80 Stops controlling 13 to 15 ranks plus three = tuned<br> percussions (Glock, Xylo, Chrysoglott) and the standard Wurlitzer "toy<br> counter".<br> <br> One can easily see that by counting keys, stops, and controls, the = result<br> adds up to a lot more than the 165 holes available on the roll, so some = note<br> ranges had to cut down and some cleaver switching arrangements had to = be<br> employed, but we won't go there today ;-)<br> <br> The Chamber pipework associated with this installation is almost all<br> Wurlitzer, but is not the original pipe work that was installed with = this<br> console when it was used for roll recording organ at the factory. The<br> console was separated from the original Factory organ and sent to Los<br> Angeles to be installed in a Wurlitzer Retail store, in a showroom (I<br> believe) above the Ambassador Theatre where it was merged with it's = existing<br> pipe work and re-assigned its present opus number 2051. Sorry, I don't = have<br> any date history when all of this relocation occurred, or why the = console<br> was divorced from the original recording organ.<br> <br> The performance Larry heard during his visit was an original = (licensed)<br> recording<br> made for the UniFlex System by Lyn Larsen and is the first in a series of<br> professional artists series of discs to be made available to our = residential<br> organ system owners, and hopefully someday they can also be translated = into<br> other system formats. Hopefully Lyn, when he can find the time can do = more<br> of these, as they have been received extremely well by our customers, = and<br> are a pleasure to listen to again and again.<br> <br> The tune selections and the registrations were selected by Lyn = specifically<br> for the Theatre Organ that would be found today, in most residential<br> installations. The modern day analogy of Lyn's recording relates = directly<br> to origin of this particular organ. It too was used to make self = playing<br> "residential" organ rolls for home installations in "those" days, = featuring<br> well known professional artists at the console, such as Jesse Crawford, = most<br> notably. There are several Crawford selections on Lyn's disc that mimic = the<br> Crawford style of playing to a point where you can't really tell if it = is<br> Lyn or a hand played Wurlitzer Crawford ROLL playing, but the recording = is<br> Lyn's work entirely.<br> <br> Since Larry has had mentioned he was not sure if the playback was Lyn OR = a<br> hand played Wurlitzer Crawford made on that console, one of our = ongoing<br> projects, and now for the owner of this instrument, since this organ = has<br> resurfaced, is to re-record ALL of paper rolls made from hand played<br> performances on this organ console while it was at the Wurlitzer = Factory.<br> The plan is to translate the roll information and export this = performance<br> data into different "file" formats that can hopefully be set up and<br> configured to play on many of the different organ performance playback<br> systems, including the record/playback system Larry Chace has designed = for<br> the Z-Tronics system.<br> <br> Translating this information is relatively easy for the UniFlex system = as<br> the system can be programmed to manage and load multiple organ profiles = or<br> "personalities". This means that it has the ability to allow the = organ<br> specification as the organ stands where installed, but it also has the<br> ability to allow the importation of "other organ specifications" that = may<br> larger or smaller than the customers organ PLAY that organ. By = re-defining<br> or re-addressing the pipe chamber magnet outputs with the system = definition<br> editor to the "other organ" wiring specifications, recordings made on one = or<br> a dozen different organs can easily play on the customers organ<br> installation.<br> <br> The Larsen recording that Larry heard was originally recorded on a = much<br> larger console with a completely different specification than the organ = it<br> was played on. Lyn was careful in his selection of stops and kept the<br> registration limited to the ranks that would be found in the typical<br> residence organ installation. What Larry heard playing was a = completely<br> different console specification that was "personalized" to play this<br> particular installation's PIPE Chamber Output boards. All I did was = take<br> the original recording organ specification (definition file) and = simply<br> re-address the pipe chamber outputs from the original organ definition = TO<br> the pipe chamber addresses of the CURRENT installation. This is = something<br> that takes about an hour to three hours to do, depending on the size of = the<br> organ. Once this is done additional recordings made on the "other" = organ<br> can be played on other organs that have had the chamber output = addresses<br> translated. If the playback organ is missing some of the ranks used on = the<br> original recording organ, we simply substitute what ever rank comes = closest<br> in sound and power level to the rank(s) used on the original recording = organ<br> and program the rank output addresses as best we can.<br> <br> The Wurlitzer ROLL translation project we are working on is very = similar.<br> The rolls may be played on either the original Wurlitzer Roll Player<br> mechanism, or as we are planning, optically scanned and converted to a<br> usable raw midi note-on, note-off format. From there, a software = simulated<br> player "relay" will take the raw roll data and process it, converting = it<br> into a format similar to what you would expect from an organ console,<br> division note data, stop data and expression data. At this point, the = rolls<br> are now in a usable format that can be further translated into = performance<br> data that could be used for many of the different relay record/play = systems<br> and then released.<br> <br> The major obstacle in all of this for "general consumption" is how the = Stops<br> are controlled, and how those stops would be interpreted on the organ<br> playing back the files on all the different systems that exist out = there,<br> since MOST hardware based playback systems are uniquely wired, and not<br> standardized from organ to organ. Some compatibility issues for = different<br> systems may be handled with keyboard and stop re-mapping, depending on = the<br> method used for turning stops on and off, but there are still some = problems<br> yet to figure out.<br> <br> Allen Organs and I believe the Peterson Performance player systems use = a<br> "Master Stop List" where Stops, couplers and keys are assigned = permanent<br> handlers and locations, so no matter how the playback device is wired, = the<br> stops SHOULD match up and be able to be controlled. This approach is = much<br> easier to work with, so those who own Allen Organs my see these rolls<br> available before some of the pipe organ systems do, IF we can ever get = this<br> translation program started! There just aren't enough hours in the = day!<br> <br> While some obstacles have yet to be overcome in the translation organ = rolls<br> into the different performance player formats, our mission of = re-recording<br> and making these rare rolls available to those who simply cannot have = or<br> afford expensive roll libraries and original players is the ultimate goal = of<br> this project. Hopefully we will be able to accomplish this in the = near<br> future.<br> <br> Sorry to have gone on so long.<br> <br> Tim<br> <br> <br> <p><table width=3D"100%" bgcolor=3D"#eeeeee"><tr><td width=3D"100%"><a = href=3D"http://msgtag.com/?source=3Dffooter"><img = src=3D"http://img.msgtag.com/bkg/gsrCgf/gj/rdAbz/BafcDwnFf/oAaucy.gif" = border=3D"0"></a> has notified the sender that this message has been = received.</td></tr></table><p></body></html>   --CPLiqxeBMiidXqUGTnXeRPGUlbA--    
(back) Subject: Re: Wurlitzer #2051 Larsen/Crawford recordings From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2003 10:52:32 -0400   Many (!) thanks to Tim Rickman for posting the details about performance recordings, Wurlitzer #2051's history, and so on. I did see those = engraved markings on the keyboards and wondered what they could mean. While the console has been fitted with many more stoptabs than originally, the original chamber markings (little dots on the stoprails over each tab) are still there, so you can see how *empty* the stoprails were orignally. The new stoptabs appeared to be using existing pneumatic operators rather than being done with new electro-mechanical SAMs.   Dealing with the stops, shades, and similar non-keyboard things is clearly a problem in the context of organ performance recordings, and it has been = a problem since the first player organs, about 100 years ago. Tim's project is a most ambitious one; best wishes for complete success, and many thanks for the plan to make the "electronic rolls" available to folks with = various types of organ control systems.   (Tim, anytime you feel like explaining any and all details of the various roll encoding formats, I'm sure there are many folks who would be glad to listen!)   Larry        
(back) Subject: [Residence Organs] Re: Wurlitzer #2051 Larsen/Crawford recordings From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2003 12:28:46 -0500   At 10:52 AM -0400 7/2/03, Larry Chace wrote: > >(Tim, anytime you feel like explaining any and all details of the various >roll encoding formats, I'm sure there are many folks who would be glad to >listen!)   I think I can second this - I'm sure that numerous folks on this list would be interested.   David