DIYAPASON-L Digest #778 - Monday, March 24, 2003
 
Messages
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Refinishing dirty wood Bourdons
  by "F. Eugene (Gene) Dunnam" <dunnam@phys.ufl.edu>
RE: [Residence Organs]  Refinishing dirty wood Bourdons
  by "Jonathan Reese" <jreese@digitas.com>
Hooks
  by <Pipewheezr@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Refinishing dirty wood Bourdons
  by <dorian@nac.net>
 

(back) Subject: Messages From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 08:04:01 EST     --part1_7a.3bdc5d5f.2bb05c41_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   List,   Thanks. I now have the two messages saved in my "filing cabinet". Glad there are a few compulsive individuals out there.   BTW, Around the time I got my organ, I read thru every single archive. I copied and pasted each message into a Word document depending upon its = topic - at least thru mid 2002. I was going to announce this in case anybody wanted to look something up.   To test it, I copied one of the messages to an e-mail and sent it to = myself. It really gets messy because all the formatting gets lost. If somebody = knows a way to do that while at least maintaining the line spacing between messages, please let me know. This might be helpful to some newcomers = since the archives aren't searchable.   Sincerely, Keith Zimmerman   --part1_7a.3bdc5d5f.2bb05c41_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">List,<BR> <BR> Thanks.&nbsp; I now have the two messages saved in my "filing = cabinet".&nbsp=3D ; Glad there are a few compulsive individuals out there.<BR> <BR> BTW, Around the time I got my organ, I read thru every single = archive.&nbsp;=3D I copied and pasted each message into a Word document depending upon its = to=3D pic - at least thru mid 2002.&nbsp; I was going to announce this in case = any=3D body wanted to look something up.<BR> <BR> To test it, I copied one of the messages to an e-mail and sent it to = myself.=3D &nbsp; It really gets messy because all the formatting gets lost.&nbsp; If = s=3D omebody knows a way to do that while at least maintaining the line spacing = b=3D etween messages, please let me know.&nbsp; This might be helpful to some = new=3D comers since the archives aren't searchable.<BR> <BR> Sincerely,<BR> Keith Zimmerman </FONT></HTML>   --part1_7a.3bdc5d5f.2bb05c41_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Refinishing dirty wood Bourdons From: "F. Eugene (Gene) Dunnam" <dunnam@phys.ufl.edu> Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 09:49:28 -0500   Hi- I went through a similar experience several years ago. You ain't really run the full gamut 'till you've tried to remove several seasons of dirt-dauber nests from inside a Bourdon that was stored in a Florida barn loft!   If possible I would avoid getting the pipes damp, as with soap. Moisture on (hide) glue joints is asking for trouble, IMHO. Here's what I did: 1. Pull the tuning stoppers 2. Use a stick or broom handle to loosen any chunky crud that's stuck to the inner surfaces & dump this out. 3. Use a stiff brush (I used a rug-cleaning brush) to remove remaining inner surface dirt. Duct-tape the brush to a broom handle if more 'reach' is needed. 4. Use a vacuum cleaner with small brush and/or crevice tool to remove the remainder of the crud. You may have to repeat these last two steps. 5. To get the last bits I blew the interior out with compressed air but I don't feel that this was really necessary.   Now as to the outer surface: I wouldn't sand it. Brush off the loose (oxidized) shellac (don't use a really stiff brush), then employ the old furniture-restorer's trick: Brush down the surface with wood alcohol, often sold as 'shellac thinner' using a moderately stiff paintbrush.. Make sure the alcohol is fresh & hasn't absorbed a lot of moisture. Unless the finish is really messed up badly the alcohol will reconstitute it. Smooth it out & let it dry. Then decide whether or not you want another coat.   I freshened up the leather on my stoppers with a little Neat's-foot oil (obtainable at Western stores or leather/saddle shops).   So this is what worked for me. Whatwever you decide to try, good luck!   Gene     ************************************************* * F. Eugene (Gene) Dunnam * * Gator Slide Farm * * 104 SE 138 Ave. <dunnam@phys.ufl.edu> * * Micanopy, FL 32667 (352) 466-3538 * * <http://www.phys.ufl.edu/~dunnam/Welcome.html>* *************************************************  
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] Refinishing dirty wood Bourdons From: "Jonathan Reese" <jreese@digitas.com> Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 10:48:15 -0500   Before he bought a boat, my dad had some free time on his hands. I had gotten hold of a Melodia rank built in 1859, if you believe the date written on the bottom of CC, and he undertook a project to restore the pipes. The pipes looked awful, covered with decades of grime. I quote his response to my question about what exactly he did with them:   "This will require some thought. The preparation involved sanding down to bare wood, then sanding "through the grades" to, I suppose, #400 to get a nice surface. At this point, any discolorations or stains can be removed, or at least minimized, with bleach or commercially available bleaching agents made especially for wood. I can't remember actually doing that last step. Then I believe I used the old-formula Watco Danish Oil... the stuff that has the severe spontaneous combustion characteristics. I'm not sure it's available any more. I guess boiled linseed oil would also work but the curing time would be longer. (Also, there are guys in Fine Woodworking who make these kinds of "penetrating" finishing oils themselves out of beeswax, turpentine and/or tung oils and/or linseed oil.) The process was so tedious I can't imagine anyone in his right mind ... uh, never mind. Anyway, the process began as a restoration/preservation deal... as you may recall the exposed end-grain at the tops of the pipes had degraded severely and my plan was to soak that end-grain with oil, let the oil cure (solidify), then soak again. All this to "reconstitute" the wood in those areas. This process was repeated until the wood would take up no more oil. Also, there was end-grain around the mouths and the bottoms of the pipes which received the same treatment. The end-grain areas required many many soaking/drying cycles to achieve full saturation. Most of the other surfaces of the pipes required only 4-5 such treatments. After enough cycles to ensure all the wood was saturated, I let the pipes cure in this condition for a long time (months?) then polished them with a few grades of steel wool, I would guess "000" then "0000"-grade. I may have given them a final finish with carnauba wax, but I can't be sure.   Regarding the wood species, I have no idea what it is. If I HAD to guess I'd say some kind of spruce."   These pipes are spectacular looking. Because of their age and newfound beauty, they are head-and-shoulders the showpiece rank of my organ. Oh - and they sound as good as they look...   I'd be curious to hear what some of the pros think about his work.  
(back) Subject: Hooks From: <Pipewheezr@aol.com> Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 10:48:31 EST     --part1_148.db7fd62.2bb082cf_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Someone was looking for these? They are on E-Bay.   E-mail item #2518229986 to a friend 17 Pipe Organ Pipe Hangers Iron       --part1_148.db7fd62.2bb082cf_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT FACE=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D3D2 = FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D =3D3D"Arial" LANG=3D3D"0">Someone was looking for these? They are on = E-Bay.<BR> <BR> <P ALIGN=3D3DCENTER></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = style=3D3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR:=3D #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D4 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" = LANG=3D3D"0"><B>E-mail=3D20=3D item #2518229986 to a friend</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D3D"#000000" = style=3D3D"BACKGRO=3D UND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D3D3 FAMILY=3D3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D3D"Arial" = LANG=3D3D"0">=3D </B> <BR> <B>17 Pipe Organ Pipe Hangers Iron</B> <BR> <BR> <P ALIGN=3D3DLEFT><BR> </P></P></FONT></HTML> --part1_148.db7fd62.2bb082cf_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Refinishing dirty wood Bourdons From: <dorian@nac.net> Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 12:41:35 -0500 (EST)   Hello, List We were faced with a similar task a little over a year ago when we had to refinish a 16' Bourdon that suffered some water damage as result of a roof leak above the organ chamber. Nothing unusual according to Murphy's law.   With a group of church volunteers in the church's side yard on a beautiful October day, we first removed all of the stoppers from the pipes.   Second, removed the abrasive dirt and plaster dust by wiping down the pipes with Murphy's oil soap. We also used a wire brush to remove the remnants of the stopper leather and felt, plaster, grit, etc. on the inside of the pipe as far as we could reach.   Third, we filled all of the cracks around the tops of the pipes with multiple applications of Titebond II, and let them dry.   Fourth, we applied two coats of Old Village Paste Varnish (also known as Heritage Village). This brand is used for restoration of many historical buildings, including Colonial Williamsburg. www.old-village.com   Since the bottoms of some of the pipes were cracked and beginning to dry rot, we manufactured new plates of 3/4" voidless birch plywood to the outer dimensions of the pipes. We found the center of the hole for the pipe foot and bored that diamater in the new plywood plate also. We left the old bottoms in place and fastened the new plates to the bottoms with Titebond and screws. It is essential that you keep the glue within 1/4" of the seam between the old bottoms and pipe body, otherwise you will prevent the sides of the pipe from being able to expand and contract as result of climatic conditions, and splitting of the pipe body can result.   Also, take the time to paint the languid with Titebond for preservation purposes. Remove the front plate of the pipe as well, and paint the underside of the languid, and the top of the bottom plate as well. In our experiences, it was necessary to do this to prevent dryrotting of the languid as the water found its way past the stopper and down the inside walls of the pipe and sat on the languid.   Hope this gives you some insight as to make some progress on your project. Of course, you can adjust the above steps to conform to what is necessary in your particular situation.   Jan S. Van Der Stad