DIYAPASON-L Digest #807 - Friday, May 9, 2003
 
Re: Whitening Ivories and Stop Tabs
  by "James Henry" <jimhen3ry@earthlink.net>
Chest placement
  by "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@socket.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Chest placement
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Chest placement
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
Lyon & Healy Horn Diapason
  by "Steven Durham" <sdurham11@attbi.com>
Re: Lyon & Healy Horn Diapason
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
Austin Couplers
  by <Kzimmer0817@aol.com>
Roosevelt III/35 to be destroyed
  by "Ed Stauff" <ed@mewsic.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Roosevelt III/35 to be destroyed
  by "rnewman" <rnewman@shop.rutgers.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Whitening Ivories and Stop Tabs From: "James Henry" <jimhen3ry@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 7 May 2003 22:19:07 -0700   Richard Wagner describes a whitening technique for piano ivories using hydrogen peroxide and UV light at this site: http://www.acrylikey.co.uk/bleaching_ivory.html    
(back) Subject: Chest placement From: "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@socket.net> Date: Thu, 8 May 2003 06:47:03 -0500   Yesterday when I posed my question......   >I am looking for suggestions about placing my great chest within the >expression chamber This chest is chromatic. The dimensions are such = that >a walk space between the chest end and the wall can only be at one end. >The question is which end? > >Would it be best to have the walk space at the bass end or the treble = end?   I failed to mention that the chest is fully accessible, both front and rear. In other words, you can walk around it on three sides. The chest is 4' 6" front to back. So which is the best way to place it in the chamber?   The treble pipes can all be reached easily be reaching across the chest from front or rear. The bass flue pipes at 8' are mitered to about 7'and there are some that require supports from the wall.   My original plan was to have the bass end with only a few inches wall clearance, but now I feel there should be a walk space at that end.   Any comments?   Bob Taylor      
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Chest placement From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Thu, 08 May 2003 07:22:29 -0500   At 06:47 AM 5/8/03 -0500, you wrote: >My original plan was to have the bass end with only a few inches wall >clearance, but now I feel there should be a walk space at that end. > >Any comments? > >Bob Taylor > Stick with your original plan...all the previous comments are valid, so = why discount them. If you are like most of us who have home (hobby) organs, = you will be giving chamber tours for anyone who happens to get within earshot of the organ....it will look more impressive looking from the treble end toward the bass end...it is not very exciting looking at the bass pipes from behind the chest.   jch    
(back) Subject: Re: Chest placement From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Thu, 8 May 2003 09:05:58 -0400   Regarding Bob Taylor's query about which end of the chest to place next to a wall, I'd concur that the bass end is the best choice. The only Aeolian chamber I've been in was done that way. In fact, the chests were accessible from only one end and one side, the other side being against = the partition wall that divided the two sections into two independing swell boxes. Against the walls were basses and larger ranks (Diapason on one chest and 8' strings on the other). More accessible were reeds and = smaller ranks.   Just make sure that no bass pipes are speaking into the end wall and that it is possible to remove *any* pipe, though in some cases you might have = to remove a few neighbors first.   Larry        
(back) Subject: Lyon & Healy Horn Diapason From: "Steven Durham" <sdurham11@attbi.com> Date: Thu, 8 May 2003 06:56:55 -0700   List:   I have a Horn Diapason made by Lyon & Healy on my home organ and I have = some questions about it that I hope someone may be able to answer. It is a 4' set and notes 1-5 are zinc with the remainder being spotted metal. They have scroll tuners from tenor C to about 2'C. From there on out they have slide tuners. There is nicking in the 4' octave but no nicking from 2' C = on up. The pipes are playing on 2.75" WP and overall they sound pretty good. However, some of them have a very pronounced type of chiff or percussive sound they make when first played.   My question is this: Do any of you think these pipes may have been = altered at some point to be "Baroque" pipes? I was wondering if the absence of nicking from 2' C on up was normal for Lyon & Healy. Also, is it worth having these pipes revoiced as I want them to sound more like Aeolian Skinner Diapasons instead of Bosch? Does anyone have an idea of what an organ builder would charge to revoice a rank?   I'd appreciate any information you can provide.   Cordially,   Steven Durham sdurham11@attbi.com Portland, OR      
(back) Subject: Re: Lyon & Healy Horn Diapason From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Thu, 8 May 2003 10:48:35 -0400   Steven Durham asked about a Lyon & Healy Horn Diapason. According to Junchen's "Encyclopedia", L&H closed their pipe organ business in 1910, well before the era of no-nicks. Many (many!) years ago I had a string from an L&H organ -- it seemed to match other ranks I had that were built by Gottfried, and it isn't difficult to surmise that L&H may well have purchased their metal pipework from suppliers like Gottfried.   At any rate, it almost 100% certainly was nicked originally, in a manner similar to the existing nicking on the tenor octave. The pipes *probably* were scroll tuned orignally, rather than being fitted with tuning slides, = a further suggestion that they've been re-worked at some point. They probably spoke on about 3-1/2" pressure, almost certainly higher than 2-3/4" as at present.   I also had a Geigen Diapason that was built by Gottfried; it was slotted all the way up and had a rather "hard" "horn" sound. Perhaps someone de-slotted the pipes to make them more of a normal Diapason sound.   Contact a local builder (Bond, in Portland, perhaps?) and see what the builder says!   Larry Chace            
(back) Subject: Austin Couplers From: <Kzimmer0817@aol.com> Date: Fri, 09 May 2003 09:32:50 -0400   List,   Before I launch into my questions - in case it might be boring to some - = I'd like to ask for responses to those who are quite familiar with the = coupler mechanisms of Vintage Austin consoles. Mine is 1926. I have = removed the coupler housings from both manuals and pedals.   I have figured out how they work both mechanically and electrically. They = need cleaning. I don't want to take loose the wrong screw and have = several hundreds of pieces go flying into the air landing in a random = pile.   So, I'd like to hear from somebody who's worked on these actions before so = I can ask a few questions.   I'm excited about my project now. The console looks bare without its = wooden panels or its wiring. Just naked frame, keyboards, stops, and = combination action. I'm going to be visiting another member's home organ = this evening to get some ideas.   Thanks, Keith  
(back) Subject: Roosevelt III/35 to be destroyed From: "Ed Stauff" <ed@mewsic.com> Date: Fri, 9 May 2003 12:30:24 -0400   I have taken the liberty of cross-posting a message from PIPORG-L which I think is both relevant and important. Please direct any replies to Sebastian, not to me.   -- Ed   Date: Wed, 7 May 2003 15:18:26 EDT From: TubaMagna@aol.com Subject: Roosevelt III/35 to be destroyed   Ladies and Gentlemen:   A critically important III/35 (with four preparations) Roosevelt organ = from 1890 will be destroyed very shortly. The pipework shows little evidence of ever being tuned since its final voicing and tonal finishing, making it one of the most important unaltered historical documents in American = organbuilding history.   Various people have been trying to save this organ for at least a decade, to no avail. This is not one of those "last-minute" things that should have been handled -- from what I understand, the search for a new home has been on for years. The building has been vacant for at least forty years, and has been sold, soon to be hit by the wrecking ball, organ and all.   My own firm has twice attempted to place this instrument, once with a = major university, and once with a private individual, both of whom could not = make the commitment at the last moment. We were so close, that photographic surveys were made, and pipemakers' marks recorded. A tremendous amount of time and money has been spent on building crates for the pipework -- for an organ that now looks like it is going down with the building. If our second possibility has a reversal of fortune at the last moment, he gets it, of course, but it looks grim at this point.   IF YOU KNOW OF ANYBODY WHO IS INTERESTED IN SAVING THIS EXCEPTIONALLY RARE DOCUMENT, have them call me, NOW. I am leaving for Leipzig on the 19th of this month, and I do not know if we even have time to save this instrument at this late date.   This is for serious enquiries from people who actually have been looking for an organ and have access to the funds needed to save it NOW -- this is no longer a long-term or speculative venture. Even if they cannot rebuild the organ now, at least this pipework can be crated and stored. It is an expensive undertaking, and worth the effort. There are fewer Roosevelts in the = world than there are Rembrandts and Vermeers. Think about it. This is your art form. We would rather not partake in an artistic violation of ethics by = splitting the organ up -- it should be saved as a substantial and important historic reference document. Is your college, university, church, museum, or well- off friend in need of a pipe organ and a good deed to their credit?   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City (212) 608-5651 (917) 749-0827 (cellular telephone)   +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ | Edward L. Stauff ed@mewsic.REMOVE_THIS_SPAMGUARD.com | | Itinerant musician, software engineer, dad, bibliophile, cohouser, | | husband, microferroequinologist, woodworker, author (order varies). | | "Specialization is for insects." -- Lazarus Long (R. A. Heinlein) | +---------------------------------------------------------------------+  
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Roosevelt III/35 to be destroyed From: "rnewman" <rnewman@shop.rutgers.edu> Date: Fri, 9 May 2003 13:01:25 -0400     DIYAPASON-Lers,   I commend Sebastian for trying to save this historic organ, but his post may be slightly misleading. Just to save others from the trouble, I'll let you know the outcome of my brief email conversation with him. Since the organ is located only 45 minutes from me in Brooklyn NY, I offered that if it really were to come down to the wire with no other takers on the organ, I would try to gather some volunteers and rent a truck to try and save as much of the organ as possible. Apparently what is actually needed is someone with about $65,000 available to buy the organ and pay to have it removed, crated and delivered. So, in the event anyone on the list has some spare cash laying around, or would like to take an equity loan on their home, I encourage you do so. I am sure you would end up with a very fine organ in the long run. But apparently this organ is NOT just up for grabs for anyone with a truck and some able bodies.   I just want to let others know the situation.   -Randy           On Friday, May 9, 2003, at 12:30 PM, Ed Stauff wrote:   > I have taken the liberty of cross-posting a message from PIPORG-L > which I > think is both relevant and important. Please direct any replies to > Sebastian, not to me. > > -- Ed > > Date: Wed, 7 May 2003 15:18:26 EDT > From: TubaMagna@aol.com > Subject: Roosevelt III/35 to be destroyed > > Ladies and Gentlemen: > > A critically important III/35 (with four preparations) Roosevelt organ > from > 1890 will be destroyed very shortly. The pipework shows little > evidence of > ever being tuned since its final voicing and tonal finishing, making it > one of > the most important unaltered historical documents in American > organbuilding > history. > > Various people have been trying to save this organ for at least a > decade, > to > no avail. This is not one of those "last-minute" things that should > have > been > handled -- from what I understand, the search for a new home has been > on > for > years. The building has been vacant for at least forty years, and has > been > sold, soon to be hit by the wrecking ball, organ and all. > > My own firm has twice attempted to place this instrument, once with a > major > university, and once with a private individual, both of whom could not > make > the commitment at the last moment. We were so close, that photographic > surveys were made, and pipemakers' marks recorded. A tremendous amount > of > time > and money has been spent on building crates for the pipework -- for an > organ > that now looks like it is going down with the building. If our second > possibility has a reversal of fortune at the last moment, he gets it, > of > course, but it looks grim at this point. > > IF YOU KNOW OF ANYBODY WHO IS INTERESTED IN SAVING THIS EXCEPTIONALLY > RARE > DOCUMENT, have them call me, NOW. I am leaving for Leipzig on the 19th > of > this > month, and I do not know if we even have time to save this instrument > at > this > late date. > > This is for serious enquiries from people who actually have been > looking > for > an organ and have access to the funds needed to save it NOW -- this is > no > longer a long-term or speculative venture. Even if they cannot rebuild > the > organ now, at least this pipework can be crated and stored. It is an > expensive > undertaking, and worth the effort. There are fewer Roosevelts in the > world > than there are Rembrandts and Vermeers. Think about it. This is your > art > form. > We would rather not partake in an artistic violation of ethics by > splitting > the organ up -- it should be saved as a substantial and important > historic > reference document. Is your college, university, church, museum, or > well- > off > friend in need of a pipe organ and a good deed to their credit? > > Sebastian M. Gluck > New York City > (212) 608-5651 > (917) 749-0827 (cellular telephone) > > +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ > | Edward L. Stauff ed@mewsic.REMOVE_THIS_SPAMGUARD.com | > | Itinerant musician, software engineer, dad, bibliophile, cohouser, | > | husband, microferroequinologist, woodworker, author (order varies). | > | "Specialization is for insects." -- Lazarus Long (R. A. Heinlein) | > +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >