DIYAPASON-L Digest #816 - Tuesday, May 27, 2003
 
Rubber Cloth, Schwimmer, Cork
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Rubber Cloth, Schwimmer, Cork
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Summer Organ Fixing (gaskets)
  by "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@socket.net>
Re: Summer Organ Fixing
  by "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com>
 

(back) Subject: Rubber Cloth, Schwimmer, Cork From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Mon, 26 May 2003 23:35:06 -0500   Kzimmer0817@aol.com wrote: > Regarding the Schwimmer, I'm certain you will hear from some > of the experts. They have been discussed on this site - > maybe on pipechat - and I get the feeling that they are a > lot of trouble. I don't know if anybody uses "concussion > bellows" (also called "winkers") any more. See page 2-7 of > the OSI catalog. This is a small reservoir installed on a > windline near a chest to collapse when quick big demands are > made on the wind.   There is nothing intrinsically wrong with well-constructed Schwimmers, per-se. However, there are some builders (particularly the "boutique" types) who feel vehemently that organ wind must "give" in response to heavy demands made upon the wind from large registrations. This is more an opinion in terms of musical taste than whether or not the mechanism itself is inherently defective in terms of its design. It's doing exactly what it is supposed to do if it is functioning properly: provide STABLE wind!   Faithfully, -- Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE (217) 944-2527 FAX arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Rubber Cloth, Schwimmer, Cork From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Mon, 26 May 2003 23:38:18 -0500   I agree fully Rich! Swhwimmers are kind of a pain in the __ ___ __. = Gary ----- Original Message ----- From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> To: "Residence Organ List" <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, May 26, 2003 11:35 PM Subject: [Residence Organs] Rubber Cloth, Schwimmer, Cork     > Kzimmer0817@aol.com wrote: > > > Regarding the Schwimmer, I'm certain you will hear from some > > of the experts. They have been discussed on this site - > > maybe on pipechat - and I get the feeling that they are a > > lot of trouble. I don't know if anybody uses "concussion > > bellows" (also called "winkers") any more. See page 2-7 of > > the OSI catalog. This is a small reservoir installed on a > > windline near a chest to collapse when quick big demands are > > made on the wind. > > There is nothing intrinsically wrong with well-constructed > Schwimmers, per-se. However, there are some builders > (particularly the "boutique" types) who feel vehemently that > organ wind must "give" in response to heavy demands made upon > the wind from large registrations. This is more an opinion in > terms of musical taste than whether or not the mechanism > itself is inherently defective in terms of its design. It's > doing exactly what it is supposed to do if it is functioning > properly: provide STABLE wind! > > Faithfully, > > -- > Richard Schneider, PRES/CEO > Schneider Pipe Organs, Inc. > 41-43 Johnston St./P.O. Box 137 > Kenney, IL 61749-0137 > (217) 944-2454 VOX > (877) 944-2454 TOLL-FREE > (217) 944-2527 FAX > arpschneider@starband.net Home Office EMAIL > arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com SHOP EMAIL > http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com URL ADDRESS > > > DIYAPASON-L: a Discussion list for owners and builders of their own > Residence Pipe Organs. > HOMEPAGE : http://www.diyapason.pipechat.org > List: mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:owner-DIYAPASON@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Summer Organ Fixing (gaskets) From: "Robert W. Taylor" <rtaylor@socket.net> Date: Tue, 27 May 2003 07:55:30 -0500   After reading the post from Paul Soulek about the use of felt to seal a chest, and also his remarks that his chest has insufficient wind, I concluded that a little discussion on gaskets is in order.   In general, felt is poor as a gasket. It appears to seal because it is such a good diffuser one cannot feel or hear the air passing through it. When felt is used, the leakage is "everywhere" in tiny amounts, and that adds up to a huge total loss.   Whatever proper gasket material is used; cork, rubber, or leather, all screw holes through the gasket should be punched. If this is not done, = the material displaced by the screw forms a small ridge surrounding the screw hole. This high spot then becomes self defeating. The very presence of the gasket makes the mating surfaces less likely to form a good seal.   Use a small tube punch, slightly larger than the screw diameter, to punch out a hole for the screw. This is best done before the gasket is installed, as the punch can damage the wood around the screw hole. An alternate method is to chuck a tube punch in an electric hand drill, and "drill out" the punching with the gasket installed. Do not try to drill the gasket with a twist drill. It will make a very messy hole.   If the screw hole is new, pre-drill the hole for the screw, install the screw tight, and then disassemble and remove the loose "saw dust" around the screw hole. Finally, assemble with a properly punched gasket and = enjoy air tight mating surfaces. If the gasket is good, the screws don't have = to be very tight.   Bob Taylor      
(back) Subject: Re: Summer Organ Fixing From: "Larry Chace" <RLC1@etnainstruments.com> Date: Tue, 27 May 2003 11:32:11 -0400   Paul Soulek asked about gasket material and about wind pressure = instability.   There have been some replies, and so I'll probably repeat some things...   Felt leaks, no matter what, and so it isn't really a good gasket material. Cork doesn't leak, but it also doesn't compress very much, and so it can't do much in the way of sealing between uneven surfaces. Various types of foam material are available, and they do accomodate uneveness, but they also tend to "relax" after a while or become gummy or simply "evaporate". Thick soft leather is the best, but it is also probably the most expensive and most difficult to find; organ supply firms carry it, but you usually have to buy complete "skins". On balance, cork is probably the best bet for the home builder.   Using compression springs on the attachment screws is also a good idea -- they will provide a good closure force and will let the wooden parts = expand and contract. Organ Suppy sells them. Without them, you run the risk of either too loose screws or too tight, which can then compress the wood fibers and become too loose!   Assuming that there is already a pressure regulator, then what Paul probably needs is a "concussion bellows", a device that changes its volume to compensate for instantaneious pressure changes, thereby minimizing = those changes. It is a bellows without any regulator valve; it simply "floats" in a middle position during normal pressure and can either expand to = absorb a sudden increase in pressure or collapse to offset a sudden drop in pressure. It should have springs, rather than weights, since springs = react "now", and it shouldn't have to move *too* much, since springs change = their force according to their position.   Aeolian-Skinner had a nify design, a small wedge bellows (perhaps 4 or 5 = or 6 inches on each side) that sat inside a chest and had an opening to the outside (connecting with the *inside* of the bellows. An internal leaf ("compass") spring held the bellows half-way open against the chest pressure. If playing a bass note suddenly caused the chest pressure to want to drop, the bellows *expanded*, reducing the effective volume inside the chest and thereby raising the pressure (nullifying the bass note's consumption, we hope).   These devices were also fitted with a valve that could should off the bellow's connection to outside air. That way, the concussion bellows = could be disabled when the Tremulant was in use, since it would tend to fight against the Tremulation effect.   Larry Chace