DIYAPASON-L Digest #902 - Monday, October 13, 2003
 
Wurlitzer Swell Shade Linkage
  by "James Henry" <jimhen3ry@earthlink.net>
Wurlitzer Auto Horn
  by "James Henry" <jimhen3ry@earthlink.net>
Re: Wide console
  by <Jess4203@aol.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  My organ project
  by "Tony Newnham" <organist@tsnp.fsnet.co.uk>
RE: [Residence Organs]  Re: Wide console
  by "Kilgen" <kilgen@wi.rr.com>
Re: [Residence Organs]  Wurlitzer Swell Shade Linkage
  by <HALTGG@aol.com>
RE: Widening doors
  by "Kilgen" <kilgen@wi.rr.com>
small console
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Organ parts for sale and for free
  by "Kilgen" <kilgen@wi.rr.com>
Chest magnet question
  by "Fredrick Brabson \(home\)" <fbrabson@bellsouth.net>
RE: [Residence Organs]  Chest magnet question
  by "atos" <atos@stirlingprop.com>
 

(back) Subject: Wurlitzer Swell Shade Linkage From: "James Henry" <jimhen3ry@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 21:51:09 -0700   Would anyone know if the holes in the wooden brackets that receive the pin that is in the wooden bar that links some pairs of shades to operate together is bushed with bushing cloth on Wurlitzer swell shades?      
(back) Subject: Wurlitzer Auto Horn From: "James Henry" <jimhen3ry@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 21:56:23 -0700   Does anyone know if the original auto horns on Wurlitzer toy counters was = an "aoogah" type horn? We are talking about a Style 240 shipped in 1927 if that makes a difference. This horn makes a loud buzzer type sound and is barely recognizable as an auto horn from the sound although it looks like = an auto horn. I understand that "aoogah" horns, at least as found in cars, = use a motor driven rotor but the horn in question has a solenoid buzzer type construction that is quite consistent with the sound.      
(back) Subject: Re: Wide console From: <Jess4203@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 01:20:04 EDT   Hi "Kilgen" (Gary) and list,   Considering how many old residence organs eventually are sold to = someone else when the original owner either retires, changes hobbies, changes = houses or deceases, it seems to me a bad idea to widen the door opening to get = the console in and then narrow it again, essentially trapping the console = inside. Another owner might chop up the console rather than chop up the door = frame. It would seem to me a relatively neat and simple matter to leave the door = frame at 45" and construct a thirteen inch fixed, but removable, insert to = narrow the door frame enough to take a standard 32" interior door. The insert = could be screwed in or be a short "double door" hinged and locked with the standard =   bolts at the top and bottom.   Just a suggestion . . . also, it's the basses (lowest pipes), not the =   bases (chests?) for the basses that you're referring to, right? Reminds = me of Minnie Guggenheim announcing that she had "Ezio Pinza, bass" [she = pronounced it as in trout and bass] for next week's concert . . . .   Best Wishes, Roy Kersey    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] My organ project From: "Tony Newnham" <organist@tsnp.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 09:33:03 +0100   Hi ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kilgen" <kilgen@wi.rr.com> To: "Residence Organ List" <DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, October 12, 2003 6:35 PM Subject: [Residence Organs] My organ project     | Hello again group; | | Thank you Freddie for sharing your project plans and to all others on = this | group for your input and advice. | | I presently am in the process of installing the 8' tuba bases and 8' | diapason bases. My original plan was to install both sets of bases on a | front and back 24 note chest but when I started just putting things in place | to see how they fit, I realized that things would just barely fit and would | be kind of awkward so I opted to eliminate the 8' diapason bases and use | electronics for those notes. I sure hope when it comes time to engineer the | electronic voices phase of my project, that the resulting tone will be | adequate and not sound overly out of place from the real pipes. | <SNIP> Another possibility - quite common in portable "box organs" is to use stopped pipes plus small scale "helpers" tuned an octave higher for the basses of the Open Diapason rank - or even just a rank of stopped pipes, although in that case the break would be quite noticeable, although the notes would at least play.   If the electronics work out, please let us know what system you use - I've got a similar problem on my project (or will have if I ever get that far!)   Every Blessing   Tony    
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] Re: Wide console From: "Kilgen" <kilgen@wi.rr.com> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 07:48:45 -0500   Hi Roy Kersey and list;   Roy your ideas on making the door easily removable are good and I have = also thought about getting a door with a side window.   I never ever gave a thought about someone trying to get the console back = out of my house. I guess the analogy would be like trying to get a home built airplane out of the cellar it was constructed in. I never had plans of moving out of the house I live in and don't think I will change my = thoughts on that unless our government changes that for me. As a single man who's family consists of a dog and a horse, I have no one to leave my life's accumulation of useless junk to. My house and the organ I build (presuming = I will finish it) has to only serve one purpose and that is to serve me for the remainder of my life. The parts I have are not exactly sought after valuable parts. What happens to it all after I am gone is meaningless to = me. In view of the present trend of building $500K+ cornfield mansions on the once farm land that is in the rural Wisconsin county I live in, I would think that the old farm country type dwelling I live in will more than likely become victim to the wrecking crew once I am gone.   Yes I did mean the lowest 12 pipes or "basses" or bass not base. Does bass mean low tones or a fish? Ah yes, as Desi Arnaz once pointed out, the English language is so confusing. I believe I drove one of my English high school teachers to drink which is a memory that delights me even to this day.   Gary       -----Original Message----- From: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org [mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org]On Behalf = Of Jess4203@aol.com Sent: Monday, October 13, 2003 12:20 AM To: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org Subject: [Residence Organs] Re: Wide console     Hi "Kilgen" (Gary) and list,   Considering how many old residence organs eventually are sold to someone else when the original owner either retires, changes hobbies, changes houses or deceases, it seems to me a bad idea to widen the door opening to get the console in and then narrow it again, essentially = trapping the console inside. Another owner might chop up the console rather than chop up the door frame. It would seem to me a relatively neat and simple matter to leave the door frame at 45" and construct a thirteen inch fixed, but removable, insert to narrow the door frame enough to take a standard = 32" interior door. The insert could be screwed in or be a short "double door" hinged and locked with the standard bolts at the top and bottom.   Just a suggestion . . . also, it's the basses (lowest pipes), not = the bases (chests?) for the basses that you're referring to, right? Reminds = me of Minnie Guggenheim announcing that she had "Ezio Pinza, bass" [she pronounced it as in trout and bass] for next week's concert . . . .   Best Wishes, Roy Kersey    
(back) Subject: Re: [Residence Organs] Wurlitzer Swell Shade Linkage From: <HALTGG@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 10:15:00 -0400   My swell shades (opus1970)has small roller bearings on each pin and the = frame is routed out to accommodate the outer race. There are small wooden = strips that are held in by screws to secure the bearings in the frame. Hal =    
(back) Subject: RE: Widening doors From: "Kilgen" <kilgen@wi.rr.com> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 11:00:38 -0500   Widening doors(My reply to a private email)     Well Like Roy pointed out, it is good to think about future removal before entrapping a large object in your house although removing a door is not = such a major project unless time is very limited.   I don't know who on this list remembers the old Dick Van Dyke show but if you were a fan of that show you will remember this quote: "My rock!?!?".   Gary    
(back) Subject: small console From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 11:31:11 -0500   Want a smaller console? I've got a 2 manual & pedal 1959 Frazee, tilting tab, that is under 32" in depth. It's now surplus to my needs (project changed directions), and I'd love to find it a good home for a bit of money.   Dennis Steckley     -----Original Message-----     My organ project by "Kilgen" <kilgen@wi.rr.com>   Another engineering task coming up is to get my big Moller console moved into my little listening room. The console is 44" wide and will not be able to pass through the door. The door in question is old and warrants replacing. What I plan to do is to buy a new door and in the process of installing it, I will temporarily widen the opening, roll the console inside and then install the new door.   Gary K.          
(back) Subject: Organ parts for sale and for free From: "Kilgen" <kilgen@wi.rr.com> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 17:06:20 -0500   I have some organ parts to sell and some to give away. I will not crate or ship, so these parts will have to be picked up from my residence within a reasonably short period of time. I am located about 45 miles west of downtown Milwaukee Wisconsin.   FOR SALE: Kilgen Petit Ensemble unit chest. Three ranks for flute, string and diapason. The leather looks good so it may be well usable without = having to rebuild however Kilgen chests are very easily rebuilt. The rack boards are not original but are made from plywood. Price: $100.   FOR SALE: Spencer blower 1/2 HP low pressure. Price: $75.   FOR SALE: Simplex blower 1/2 HP low pressure. Has wind outlet facing out horizontal from the bottom. Price: $50   FOR FREE: Gulbransen Walnut horseshoe theatre console. 25 pedals. Would = make a nice small console for a small home pipe organ. The solo manual has 12 switches and the accompaniment manual has 9 switches. The wooden keyboards are pipe organ quality and in excellent condition. The stop rail lights up beautifully and there are six locking pistons that would make a nice blind combination action. I have a variety of Gulbransen stop keys that could = fit several different specification schemes.   FOR FREE: Beautiful 30 note Aeolian pedal board. Could be easily married = to the Gulbransen console with minimal modifications to the console and = bench. I also have the Aeolian pedal switch and swell shoe mechanism.   If anyone is interested in the free items, please contact me quickly = before I have to take the saw and hammer to them.   Gary    
(back) Subject: Chest magnet question From: "Fredrick Brabson \(home\)" <fbrabson@bellsouth.net> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 21:09:27 -0400   Hi List,   Nice to see some activity again!   Would anyone care to comment on the particular applications for which the Reisner C-17 e-p chest magnet might be appropriate (as opposed to their standard magnets or adjustable port magnets). Just curious.   For those needing more details, the OSI catalog offers the following description: "The C-17 chest magnet features a flat base, special .563" diameter large armature paper gasketed on both side, larger ports and latch-type cap. This magnet provides larger exhaust rate and is easily opened for cleaning. Operates best in vertical orientation."   Also, I'd be interested to hear from folks using electric chest actions (Wicks Direct-Electric, Reisner Direct Pallets, Peterson All-Electric, = etc.) with regard to the upper limits of windpressure for such actions, coil resistance (or choice thereof, if you purchased new actions), and the relationship of the two. Am considering this approach for my instrument, bearing in mind that many a theatre organist's fingernails curl backwards = at the very mention of these actions....supposedly something about how the = pipe takes the tremulant. But I'm not planning on using over 6" of wind.... = Any thoughts?   Freddie      
(back) Subject: RE: [Residence Organs] Chest magnet question From: "atos" <atos@stirlingprop.com> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 21:01:51 -0500   I just finished restoring a Wicks theatre organ that runs 8.5" of wind. = The direct acting magnets seem to be working fine under these conditions. The main 5 rank chest uses direct magnets down to the last octave and Wicks 2 stage direct actions for the lowest notes and the pedal offset. Photos of the open chest can be seen on the website for St.Joseph Church in Ponchatoula, LA. The organ originally came from the Ideal Theatre in the same town and is Wicks Opus 838. You can view the site at either http://atos.stirlingprop.com/stjoseph/index.htm or www.neworleanschurches.com. On the New Orleans Churches site, go to "churches in Tangipahoa Parish" and click on St.Joseph Catholic Church. We have kept a running photo journal on the restoration so the congregation = can see where their money is going.   On the Wicks, the tremulant doesn't seem to be a problem. It is, however, possible to outplay the action on very fast songs. -----Original Message----- From: DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org [mailto:DIYAPASON-L@pipechat.org]On = Behalf Of Fredrick Brabson (home) Sent: Monday, October 13, 2003 8:09 PM To: Diyapason List Subject: [Residence Organs] Chest magnet question     Hi List,   Nice to see some activity again!   Would anyone care to comment on the particular applications for which = the Reisner C-17 e-p chest magnet might be appropriate (as opposed to their standard magnets or adjustable port magnets). Just curious.   For those needing more details, the OSI catalog offers the following description: "The C-17 chest magnet features a flat base, special .563" diameter large armature paper gasketed on both side, larger ports and latch-type cap. This magnet provides larger exhaust rate and is easily opened for cleaning. Operates best in vertical orientation."   Also, I'd be interested to hear from folks using electric chest actions (Wicks Direct-Electric, Reisner Direct Pallets, Peterson All-Electric, = etc.) with regard to the upper limits of windpressure for such actions, coil resistance (or choice thereof, if you purchased new actions), and the relationship of the two. Am considering this approach for my instrument, bearing in mind that many a theatre organist's fingernails curl backwards = at the very mention of these actions....supposedly something about how the = pipe takes the tremulant. But I'm not planning on using over 6" of wind.... = Any thoughts?   Freddie