PipeChat Digest #42 - Friday, August 22, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: Re: Unison Off stops (with humor) From: David Neal <david@neal.u-net.com> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 1997 20:14:07 +0100   At 18:18 19/08/97, Shirley wrote: > >I saw an organ stop recently at 8/9'. How >about leaving the unison on, and pull the 8/9' for the sermon? Nobody'd >sleep through *that* sermon! :) >   </lurk> Come on Shirley, you'll have to tell us more. What is 8/9' as an interval .... if I've worked it out correctly it must be a 23rd? ... and what sort of organ, division, etc.?   I suppose someone somewhere is going to have to specify a 7-1/9' to go with a 64' pedal stop - almost beyond imagination in real wood or metal, but probably only about 3 mouse clicks for a Rodgers/Allen/'whatever' engineer ;-)   Thanks for an inspiring list.   <lurk>   David N.   =============================================================== David J Neal, Wrexham, Wales, UK home: david@neal.u-net.com work: dneal@yale.ac.uk ===============================================================  
(back) Subject: Organist/Organbuilder Ethics From: "Bob, Diane & Jeff Kinner" <rkinner@one.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 1997 19:13:42 -0400   Dear List Members, I had the unfortunate opportunity to inspect an organ today which had been idle for a few years in need of repairs. I had played, and been very familiar with, this instrument for about 10 years in the 1970's, and the church is considering restoring it. I had the dismay - and, I must say, disgust - to see what had been done to it, apparently at the behest of "someone" in the church. This was a beautiful 3/28 organ installed in 1935 of the finest workmanship, and was characterized by "Father Willis" (ie large scale) diapasons. "Someone" replaced the 8' Open Diapason and the 4' Octave Diapason on the Great with the pipe shop generics of much lower quality, and - hold on to your seats - had the 8' Opens sawed in half and capped to form an 8' stopped diapson - and - had the 4' octave capped to form some sort of a loud 8' stopped diapson on the Choir - removing a Clarabella to make room for it! Some of the pipes on the Great Mixture III had obviously been fooled with as they no longer fit the rack holes. In fact - oh, an 8' Harmonic Flute had been removed to make room for the hacked/capped diapason - *none* of the new ranks fit the racks, all being of smaller scale than the originals - too much trouble for the organbuilder to take, I guess; the chest looked like a bed of giant magnolias after a hard rain. My question: Who (organist, organbuilder, whoever) would do such a thing? The Great Diapasons are the organ builder's trademark, his signature, his fingerprint. Add what you will to an organ, but don't tamper with the diapason chorus. This is probably not the first organ-butchering story you've heard, but this one is too close to home for me. Bob -- Bob Kinner AA8FH rkinner@one.net Home Page: http://w3.one.net/~rkinner/      
(back) Subject: Re: ACCHOS From: Giwro@aol.com Date: Thu, 21 Aug 1997 20:29:19 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-08-21 20:18:17 EDT, you write:   << If you or anyone you know are interested in becoming a member of the Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ Society, please send me: - your name, address, and telephone number - your E-Mail address - your birthday >>   Jonathan Orwig 1000 Pine Ave. #111 Redlands, CA 92373 909-798-7980 10/29  
(back) Subject: Re: Unison Off stops (with humor) From: "Jim Saenger" <chamade@Early.COM> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 97 18:43:37 PDT   one of my favorite pitches is 8/11.     ---------- > At 18:18 19/08/97, Shirley wrote: > > > >I saw an organ stop recently at 8/9'. How > >about leaving the unison on, and pull the 8/9' for the sermon? Nobody'd > >sleep through *that* sermon! :) > > > > </lurk> > Come on Shirley, you'll have to tell us more. What is 8/9' as an interval > ... if I've worked it out correctly it must be a 23rd? ... and what sort of > organ, division, etc.? > > I suppose someone somewhere is going to have to specify a 7-1/9' to go with > a 64' pedal stop - almost beyond imagination in real wood or metal, but > probably only about 3 mouse clicks for a Rodgers/Allen/'whatever' engineer ;-) > > Thanks for an inspiring list. > > <lurk> > > David N. > > =============================================================== > David J Neal, Wrexham, Wales, UK > home: david@neal.u-net.com work: dneal@yale.ac.uk > =============================================================== > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: ACCHOS From: "Jim Saenger" <chamade@Early.COM> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 97 18:55:24 PDT   I am interested in a capital project to restore the Convention Hall Organ. Let us all know why you would like to know our birthdays.   Jim Saenger   ---------- > > Dear Friends of the "King of Instruments": > > As you well know, there is an organization called "The Friends of the > Wanamaker Organ", devoted to the maintenance and welfare of the Grand Court > Organ in the former Wanamaker Department Store in Philadelphia, PA. The organ > > there is one of the largest in the world, and is a national historic landmark, > > well-known for its beautiful sonorities and active history in the pipe organ > world. > Approximately 70 miles southeast of Philadelphia is the other of the > world's > largest organs, located in the Atlantic City Convention Hall, on the > boardwalk, in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Contained therein is the 1929 7-447 > Midmer-Losh pipe organ, which boasts, among other things, the world's most > powerful stops, which resonate at 100" of wind pressure, and the world's > tallest pipes, belonging to the Pedal Organ's 64' Diaphone Profunda! The > Covention Hall also contains, in its Ballroom, a fine theater organ: a > four-manual Kimball pipe organ. > Unfortunately, time and lack of adequate care has caused these > magnificent > instruments to fade from their original splendor and glory. The mammoth > Midmer-Losh organ has suffered from the lack of an adequate maintenance crew > and attention from Atlantic City officials and is in need of care. This great > > organ, once fully operational, is currently only partially playable, but has > the potential to once again take its rightful place among the higher ranks of > renown in the pipe organ world. > Thus, this letter announces the formation of the Atlantic City > Convention > Hall Organ Society (ACCHOS). Founded by Mr. Stephen D. Smith, the aims of the > > Society will include: > > - Creating a greater awareness of, and interest in, the Atlantic City > Convention Hall organs, > - Promoting the instruments through newsletters, magazine articles, > recordings, etc. > - Providing information, re. each organ's present condition > - Raising money towards the cost of repairs and maintenance > - Updating members about current work being undertaken on the > nstruments > - Arranging an annual ACCHOS meeting at the Convention Hall > - Organ recitals at the Convention Hall > > The Society is currently in the process of being recognized by the Federal > Government as a non-profit organization, and effort is being made towards the > establishment of a Constitution. You may join, at no intitial cost. There is > > no cost for membership until we are established as a non-profit organization, > at which time you may discontinue your membership, if so desired. > If you or anyone you know are interested in becoming a member of the > Atlantic > City Convention Hall Organ Society, please send me: > > - your name, address, and telephone number > - your E-Mail address > - your birthday > > Please also list any way in which you can help furthur the ACCHOS and its > noble cause. > There are already 50 members of the ACCHOS, and the numbers are growing. > > Those who become members are assigned numbers which are allotted to the > organ's stop number (for example, stop #9 is the infamous Grand Ophicleide, > which resonates on 100" of wind pressure). Our monthly newsletter, "The > Ophicleide", will inform you as to developments and progress. > Thank you for your attention and interest in the ACCHOS. Once this > great > organ is restored, it will once again proclaim to the world the reason why the > > organ remains the "King of Instruments"! > > > Sincerely, > > Peter F. Lenox > President > Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ Society > 100 East Wynnewood Road > Wynnewood, PA 19096 > (610) 667-3394 > E-Mail: PLenox@msn.com > > (please include my name on all correspondence sent to this address) > (when calling, please ask for Peter Lenox) > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Home Sound System - Speaker Recommendations? From: cathedral@linknet.net Date: Wed, 20 Aug 1997 09:33:09 -0500   It's well past time for me to take the plunge and upgrade my home system. I'm particularly anxious that the speakers be able to handle the low end well. A couple of years ago, I heard a powered sub-woofer by Velodyne, and I was very impressed.   Has anyone been out shopping recently who would care to share their findings/recommendations?   Thanks, Travers Koerner      
(back) Subject: Lightning strikes! From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 00:50:25   Hi, folks--   Well, it finally happened.   As you may remember, the Abington organ has gone high-tech: the Moller console's guts were replaced by a computer.   Lightning hit the church.   And again, the computer network in the church's offices went out. Separate from that however, is the organ, which was also affected this time.   Strange things started happening.   Flutes pitched at 8' were also playing at 4'.... the Harmonic 32' was playing in inverted 4ths instead of 5ths (D-G instead of G-D, e.g.).... and then there was the Antiphonal organ.   The Antiphonal operates off a blower of its own. We threw the switch to turn it on, and the whole thing ciphered!!!! Geez..... there are maybe 10 ranks back there.... every pipe was making its presence known.   And every computer chip that operates the Antiphonal, blown. It'll be weeks before they get that straightened out.   Ah, ain't technology great?!?   --Shirley PS-- to the organ crew's credit, they got the organ up and playing by Sunday morning. We were missing a couple of unimportant ranks (and the Antiphonal), but it carried the service just fine. We have an organ curator on staff, who is also on call. :)