PipeChat Digest #43 - Saturday, August 23, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: Re: Lightning strikes! From: patmai@juno.com (Patricia R. Maimone) Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 05:33:34 -0400   Dear Shirley + Pipechatters,   >Lightning hit the church. Wow! What a way to awaken this early Friday morning..   At first I thought that you might be referring to the fact that the ELCA (Evangelical Lutheran Church in America) voted to observe Communion with the Reformed, Presbyterian and UCC churches this past Monday, August 18, 1997 ;-) , but such was _not_ the case..   Sorry that the computer network in your (Abingdon's) church's offices went out. _ Very_ sorry to hear about your troubles with the organ.. The _Cadet_ Chapel** at West Point (where I pinch-hit and give occasional recitals) has 6 different blowers which have been struck a few times...   >And every computer chip that operates the Antiphonal, blown. It'll be >weeks before they get that straightened out. >>Ah, ain't technology great?!? Some days yes, others... one begins to wonder..   >PS-- to the organ crew's credit, they got the organ up and playing by >Sunday morning. We were missing a couple of unimportant ranks (and the >Antiphonal), but it carried the service just fine. Let's hear it for the organ crew! _Yea_ team!   > We have an organ curator on staff, who is also on call. :) That is a marvelous plus. Thus, there seems to be _some_ wisdom in Abingdon's powers that be, even though they have a need for draperies to cover up what they want to keep working!   ** There is now a web site for the Cadet Chapel organ..   Thanks to Scott Dettra, son of Cadet Chapel Organist-Choirmaster Lee Dettra, you may visit online at   http://GENIUS.rider.edu/~dettra It is also accessible through the PIPORG-L website.   Pat Maimone _Post_ Chapel, West Point, where the two full-time Cadet Chapel curators will tune the 3 manual, 57-rank hybrid (pedal division, especially) this morning. Senior Choir has had 2 rehearsals already, Handbells start next week, and the elementary school children's choirs will resume right after Labor Day, since they started school yesterday!    
(back) Subject: lightning and solid state technology From: "Thomas E. Gregory" <tgregory@carroll1.cc.edu> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 06:20:08 -0600 (CDT)   Greetings:   Shirley wrote a short note regarding lightning and the computer failure on her instrument. This is the one great fear that I have with the new solid state computer technology.   Our old Skinner still plays with the old pheumatic relay system. It has not failed in over 70 years.   Will the new systems being installed today have that record of success?   T. Gregory  
(back) Subject: Re: lightning and solid state technology From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 08:50:13 -0400   Congratulations to Tom Gregory on still having your original Skinner relay. Being pro- mechanical action, I like to be able to see what is working. I have worked on Skinner and Moller actions and find it infinitely easier to trouble shoot on Saturday afternoon or Sunday morning than staring into a box of wired and little cards/boards that all look alike. When you relays start to need releathering, my advice is to learn how to do it yourself (it really is easy), start with the bad ones and then go through the whole relay a little bit at a time. It will give you something to do when things are slow (!) and also save a bunch of money (service people are going to hate me for this). As you get into it you will see why it is so expensive to have it done--it is very labor intensive, but you will be amazed at how little it costs in materials. The same goes for the primaries and chest leather. Electropneumatic action, especially Skinner and Moller and probably others, is very simple and logical. Actually, I also find it quite therapeutic to sit in a quiet place and do this kind of manual labor. I would be interested in knowing more about your Skinner. Preserve, preserve.   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: ACCHOS From: "Terry Charles" <tcorgans@imsweb.net> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 09:43:42 -0400   VERY much interested in the ACCH projects!   Terry Charles Curator of the Organ The Kirk of Dunedin 2686 Bayshore Boulevard Dunedin, Floirda 34698 ph: (813) 733-9305 em: <tcorgans@imsweb.net>   THANKS!   ps : are you placing this quest on piporg-l as well?  
(back) Subject: Re: Speakers From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 08:46:07   While I haven't auditioned speakers recently, when I last did (a good 10 years or so ago) I did so by taking recordings of various organ music. I found Frazier speakers to do the best job. I use some large bookshelf models for my stereo system, and when I crank up Ride of the Valkyries, the neighbors start calling, and they're a good 50' away, through several walls!   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning strikes! From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 11:31:52   At 05:33 08/22/97 -0400, you wrote:   > > We have an organ curator on staff, who is also on call. :) > That is a marvelous plus. Thus, there seems to be _some_ >wisdom >in Abingdon's powers that be, even though they have a need for draperies > to cover up what they want to keep working!   Heh. I guess I used the wrong word in that post. They're not "draperies" in the sense of material, just in how they're hung. They *are* (or at least, used to be) porous, before the dust filled up the holes in the fabric. Sound gets out just fine. But when the committee replaces these drapes, I want to be sure they don't go in the wrong direction!   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning strikes! From: Bob Luderer <bobsled@nji.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 14:10:39 -0700   > >Lightning hit the church.   > > >And every computer chip that operates the Antiphonal, blown. It'll be > >weeks before they get that straightened out. > >>Ah, ain't technology great?!? > Some days yes, others... one begins to wonder.. > > >PS-- to the organ crew's credit, they got the organ up and playing by > >Sunday morning. We were missing a couple of unimportant ranks (and the > >Antiphonal), but it carried the service just fine. > Let's hear it for the organ crew! _Yea_ team! > > > We have an organ curator on staff, who is also on call. :)     Yes, but it would appear that much needed backup power and fusing is sadly missing!!    
(back) Subject: Re: Speakers From: cathedral@linknet.net Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 13:17:43 -0500   Thanks for the advice!      
(back) Subject: Re: Home Sound System - Speaker Recommendations? From: "Mark Huth" <mhuth@rodgers.rain.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 10:53:27 PDT     Travers Koerner wrote:   > It's well past time for me to take the plunge and upgrade my home system. > I'm particularly anxious that the speakers be able to handle the low end > well. A couple of years ago, I heard a powered sub-woofer by Velodyne, and > I was very impressed. > > Has anyone been out shopping recently who would care to share their > findings/recommendations?   I don't know if you saw my comments posted recently to the "other" pipe organ list, but I'll post them here as well. I recently took the plunge and upgraded my stereo equipment and did a lot of comparison shopping.   To my ears, there are many respectable speaker companies out there with good products. Many times, the decision to buy a particular brand comes down to budget and taste. I ended up purchasing a pair of Alon II speakers, mainly because I found the imaging and realism to be almost unbelievable. This particular speaker is able to spread the stereo field out, both right to left and front to back, so that you actually can't tell if the speakers are actually making sound - - - it seems to emanate from a wide area surrounding the speakers.   I was also please that the speakers were flat down to 39Hz and did a respectable job below that to 20Hz. However, thunderous bottom end wasn't my first criteria when selecting these speakers, rather, I was looking for clean, crisp response in the stereo cabinets and plan to add a single subwoofer to the system sometime soon for everything else below 39Hz.   One note about subwoofer systems. I believe it's imperative to have stereo cabinets which produce a fair amount of bottom end if you want to go with a single subwoofer design. If you're looking at smaller stereo cabinets (like the popular satellite speaker design), then you should look at two subwoofers, one for left and one for right. Otherwise, the subwoofer will be expected to reproduce frequencies which are high enough to be placed in the stereo field and the imaging will be lost.   My particular choice was to buy larger stereo cabinets which had exceptional imaging and good bottom end so that the subwoofer I get in the future will only have to do the lowest monaural sounds.   I do believe that there are many great speaker companies out there and your ears will be the best judge as to which ones are for you. I tend to believe that speakers should be the most significant investment in a sound system, followed closely by an amplifier which is powerful enough to deliver more clean power than you'll usually need (I ended up with a Carver amp with 5 channels of 125W each).   Take your favorite CDs to the store and start comparing speakers - - - I'm sure you'll find some you simply can't live without. Good luck, and keep us informed as to what you end up with.   Mark       Mark Huth Rodgers Instrument Corporation mhuth@rodgers.rain.com   Actual quote from grade school essay on classical music: 'Music sung by two people at the same time is called a duel.'    
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning strikes! From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 12:15:07 -0700   While we're on the subject .. what do you experts recommend to protect the electronics of either EP electronic-relay-controlled pipe organs or all-electronic organs from power surges? I expect not much can be done to protect from a *direct* lightning strike. How about next-best protection from massive surges? Is anything fast/sensitive enough to prevent complete destruction of IC's and other very sensitive devices?   Personally, I'd hope for some form of actual fuse or circuit breaker that would cut the power completely in the event of a large surge event .. and which would require manual resetting. That way, if no one were in the building to 'monitor' the surges, at least the circuitry would be safeguarded from further harm, once the 'guardian' was tripped.   I'm wondering because I'm building a portable MIDI'd Carousel pipe organ which will travel thru the midwest and east, and I'd sure like to know what to build-in in the way of surge protection. I haven't had much need for such protection out here .. so far!   Thanks folks! :)   Ron Yost Paso Robles, California  
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning strikes! From: Roger Pariseau <grinder@west.net> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 12:31:33 -0700   At 12:15 PM 8/22/97 -0700, you wrote:   >While we're on the subject .. what do you experts recommend to protect the >electronics of either EP electronic-relay-controlled pipe organs or >all-electronic organs from power surges? I expect not much can be done to >protect from a *direct* lightning strike. How about next-best protection >from massive surges? Is anything fast/sensitive enough to prevent complete >destruction of IC's and other very sensitive devices? > >Personally, I'd hope for some form of actual fuse or circuit breaker that >would cut the power completely in the event of a large surge event .. and >which would require manual resetting. That way, if no one were in the >building to 'monitor' the surges, at least the circuitry would be >safeguarded from further harm, once the 'guardian' was tripped.   A _good_ surge protector from a good company is your best best. Tripplite Isobar devices offer up to $25,000 reimbursement for equipment protected by some of their Isobars (ones costing $90 and up). Among other things like line filtering), they clamp the "hot" and "neutral" lines to ground when a surge occurs. Depending upon the severity and duration of the surge, this typically trips the circuit breaker or blows a fuse.   --   Roger Pariseau - grinder@west.net --------------------------------- "Not only do we learn from the mistakes of others, but we also learn that it is wiser to enthrone and follow principles than it is to enthrone and follow people." -- Marilyn Vos Savant  
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning strikes! From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 14:40:33 -0500   >While we're on the subject .. what do you experts recommend to protect the >electronics of either EP electronic-relay-controlled pipe organs or >all-electronic organs from power surges? I expect not much can be done to >protect from a *direct* lightning strike. How about next-best protection >from massive surges? Is anything fast/sensitive enough to prevent complete >destruction of IC's and other very sensitive devices? > >Personally, I'd hope for some form of actual fuse or circuit breaker that >would cut the power completely in the event of a large surge event .. and >which would require manual resetting. That way, if no one were in the >building to 'monitor' the surges, at least the circuitry would be >safeguarded from further harm, once the 'guardian' was tripped. > >I'm wondering because I'm building a portable MIDI'd Carousel pipe organ >which will travel thru the midwest and east, and I'd sure like to know what >to build-in in the way of surge protection. I haven't had much need for >such protection out here .. so far!   They should be put on "surge suppressors" the same as computer equipment. It pays to buy the best units available and in many cases the manufacturers will provide and guarantee and "insurance" up to a certain dollar amount. There are also "whole house" surge protectors available that are installed by the Power Company on the Meter Box. I would imagine that they have something available for buildings like Churches which of course have a greater power input than the normal house. These would not only protect the organ but also any other computer equipment installed in the building along with anything else that might be damaged by a power surge. Check with your Power Company. It is well worth spending a small monthly fee with the Power Company for the peace of mind that they provide.   David   ********************************** David Scribner Black Iris Consulting 4775 Balmoral Drive Pensacola, FL 32504-9174 850-478-9635 - Voice 850-476-0711 - Fax david@blackiris.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning strikes! From: "Richard B. Ahlvin" <rahlvin@magnolia.net> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 14:41:53 -0500   Ron Yost wrote: > > While we're on the subject .. what do you experts recommend to protect the > electronics of either EP electronic-relay-controlled pipe organs or > all-electronic organs from power surges? I expect not much can be done to > protect from a *direct* lightning strike. How about next-best protection > from massive surges? Is anything fast/sensitive enough to prevent complete > destruction of IC's and other very sensitive devices? > > Personally, I'd hope for some form of actual fuse or circuit breaker that > would cut the power completely in the event of a large surge event .. and > which would require manual resetting. That way, if no one were in the > building to 'monitor' the surges, at least the circuitry would be > safeguarded from further harm, once the 'guardian' was tripped. <snip> A fuse may give some protection, but a circuit breaker is usually far too slow to offer surge protection. They are purposly designed to pass many times their rated current for short times. (They are thermally activated.) Fuses are a little better but it takes time for the fuse element to melt. The common surge protectors contain a device called a Metal Oxide Varister (MOV) which is connected directly across the AC line. They are an open circuit unless the voltage exceeds a certain predetermined level. Above that threshold voltage the MOV conduct heavily which effectively places a short circuit across the AC line. Thus the surge is eliminated and the energy dissipated by the MOV. However, an MOV device can only dissipate a certain amount of energy and will destroy itself if that level is exceeded. (Lightning surges often destroy MOVs.)   I always use and highly recommend a regulated transformer such as the Trip-Lite LC-1200 (That particular model is good for 1200 watts.) There are several brands available at any power-level desired. These are ferroresonant (sp?) transformers with surge protection. They will regulate the voltage as well as respond (implicitly) instantly to surges. (except "direct-hits" that blow-up the transformer.) I have one of these on my electronic music stuff and also on my computer. I have never had any power related problems with any of my equipment although we have frequent thunder storms and power outages in my area. -- Richard B. Ahlvin e-mail: rahlvin@magnolia.net  
(back) Subject: Carmelite Priory, London. From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 16:33:00 -0400   I have been asked to produce a four hour radio show on Sunday 31st August, and among the recordings I would like to play is an LP of Monteverdi's Magnificat for six Voices, which I recently picked up at a flea market.   The recording is a L'Oiseau Lyre (SOL 263 of 1963 vintage), and the Magnificat sounds very well, - although the other side which contains the 1640 Mass for Four Voices appears to have been attacked with a carving knife, and is quite unplayable!   To introduce this recording properly, I would like to know the answers to the following questions:   1: Where is the Carmelite Priory in London? I lived there for forty years and cannot place it.   2: Is anything known about the organ there? Builder? Date? Or anything else?   3: The recording is by the Choir of the Carmelite Priory, conducted by George Malcom, but the organ accompaniment is played by Colin Mawby, of whom I know nothing.   Any answers to the above queries would be gratefully received.   Thanks for your help.   Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Organic DeeJay Emeritus, - mostly! CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA    
(back) Subject: Re: Carmelite Priory, London. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 18:20:13 -0500 (CDT)   At 04:33 PM 8/22/97 -0400, Bob Conway wrote:   >1: Where is the Carmelite Priory in London? I lived there for forty years >and cannot place it. > >2: Is anything known about the organ there? Builder? Date? Or anything >else?   I must confess to being rather puzzled about the Carmelite Priory too, but have some suggestions.   There is a Carmelite Monastery in Golders Green, which has a 3-stop 1-manual tracker organ built by Kenneth Tickell & Company in 1989.   There is a Carmelite Church in Kensington. This had a 24-stop 2-manual 1866 Cavaille-Coll, which alas was replaced by a new Walker organ of approximately the same size in 1965.   The only Priory I know of in London is the Priory of St. Dominic, Haverstock Hill, St. Pancras, which has one of the best surviving Father Willis organs around, an unaltered 35-stop 3-manual tracker dating from 1883. I think, however, that this Priory is Dominican rather than Carmelite.   Perhaps it is one of these three, however.   Alternatively, you could just talk about the Carmelites. The Order of our Lady of Mount Carmel was founded in twelfth-century Palestine by St. Berthold. After the crusades many of the monks moved to Europe under the leadership of St. Simon Stock, and an order of Carmelite Sisters was also formed in the fifteenth century. The Sisters were reformed by St. Teresa of Jesus in the sixteenth-century and the reform spread to the Brothers under the leadership of St. John of the Cross. The most famous Sister in more recent times was St. Teresa of Lisieux.   The Carmelites are not of course to be confused with the Caramelites, an order founded by St. Frideswide in the twelfth century and noteworthy for the caramel produced in their famous Treacle Well at Binsey near Oxford :)   Anyway, good luck with the program,   John.      
(back) Subject: Re: Speakers From: "Harry C. Bellangy" <harryb@acy.digex.net> Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 19:38:53 -0400   Hi...   A couple of years when shopping for replacement speakers I took several favorite CD's. Visited mass marketing audio stores and small, more personal operations. I was allowed to 'play' in both environments. I settled on JBL L-7 4 way tower. They have an impressive low end with the addition of another subwoofer ( 12", 8" 5" and titanium tweeter) They are driven by a SONY receiver 250W/channel. The speakers are rated at 450W 6ohm. I later acquired a matching center channel speaker along with matching rear channel speakers. With the controls on the SONY, I can approximate the delay and reverb of ACCH...   Harry Bellangy Vice President, Southern Jersey Theatre Organ Society (3/8 Kimball, Broadway Theatre, Pitman, New Jersey is our restoration project)  
(back) Subject: PRESERVE, PRESERVE From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 20:28:02 -0400 (EDT)   Bruce, maybe there is an "electro-pneumatic fanatic" hiding in there somewhere!!! I'm interested in Skinner info. too. Hello to fellow posters after a few days away!   RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: PRESERVE, PRESERVE From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 20:30:52 -0400   Randy....   ssssssssssssshhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!     Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Church Moller and its acoustics From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 20:31:19 -0400 (EDT)   AMEN Scott and others for your enlightening comments, and a big hurray for the MIGHTY MOLLER! RandyT  
(back) Subject: Electric action chest magnets. From: Roy.Gutfinski@ptbbs.dhs.state.me.us Date: 22 Aug 1997 23:00:12 EDT   I understand that Wicks Organ Company has a proprietary interest in and registered trademark on the name Direct Electric Action. What is the proper term to use for the action on a non-Wicks organ that has electrically operated chest magnets controlled by electrical connection to the manuals and stop controls without any pneumatics between the keys and chest magnets?