PipeChat Digest #44 - Sunday, August 24, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: Re: Carmelite Priory, London. From: "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@interalpha.co.uk> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 11:21:10 +0100       ---------- > From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> > To: piporg-l@cnsibm.albany.edu > Cc: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Carmelite Priory, London. > Date: 22 August 1997 21:33   > > 3: The recording is by the Choir of the Carmelite Priory, conducted by > George Malcom, but the organ accompaniment is played by Colin Mawby, of > whom I know nothing.   Could possibly be one and the same as the Colin Mawby now based in Dublin, Ireland. He was last seen conducting the RTE Philharmonic Choir and the RTE Chamber Choir (the latter is now known by a different name). Radio Telifis Eireann (RTE) is the national television station in Ireland. They employ the formally named RTE Chamber Choir and its conductor - Colin Mawby. Perhaps the music dept. of the television station could help. Sorry I don't have an e mail address for them but they are -   Radio Telifis Eireann Donnybrook Dublin Ireland.   Hope this is some help.     Emma Scott-Copeland >   > > Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> > Organic DeeJay Emeritus, - mostly! > CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz > Radio Queen's University > Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 > CANADA > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: How to select a pipe organ builder From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 09:29:18 -0400   The opening program for the Gainesville FL AGO is a clergy/organist dinner with a panel discussion of "getting a pipe organ for your church". We have Bertram Kinzey, an acoustical consultant, speaking about acoustics; John Tyrrell, former President of AEolian-Skinner, to discuss placement; and I will be discussion the selection of an organ builder. I would like to draw on the collective resources and experiences of this eclectic group for information such as criteria, experiences and humorous anecdotes (or antidotes). Contributions may be sent privately (if you are afraid of flames!) to <dean-ago-gville@webtv.net> or ayred publickly here. In any case, thanks for your help.   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: lightning and solid state technology From: DaveW10140@aol.com Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 09:33:49 -0400 (EDT)   I would hope that anyone with expensive solid-state equipment would take the time to check out what is available in superior surge suppressors. Forget the kind you can buy at most retailers for $20. The components deteriorate with each surge and they eventually become useless.   Isobar sells for $45-60 and come with an insurance policy to cover connected equipment. It may be tough to collect however. A company named Transtector sells high end suppressors for $125-200. They claim their units do not deteriorate with time. They have a limited time insurance for connected equipment that is renewable for a charge. The suppressor however will be replaced free for life if it fails. We had one on an organ in a church that took a lightening hit, was destroyed and replaced free of charge. It protected the organ from damage.   Dave Wordell AOB ORGAN CONSULTANTS INC.  
(back) Subject: Re: PRESERVE, PRESERVE From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 10:02:02 -0400 (EDT)   Bruce: <Randy Laughing :-)>  
(back) Subject: Re: Organist/Organbuilder Ethics From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 10:09:05 -0400 (EDT)   Bob.....probably there would be more appreciation of the 1935 instrument today with the swing in styles......in my opinion, adding compatible ranks to complete a chorus or add mutations is better than throwing out original stops, etc.....too bad for the instrument in question.......RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: Electric action chest magnets. From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 10:10:40 -0400 (EDT)   ELECTRO-MECHANICAL ????  
(back) Subject: Re: ACCHOS From: "George W. Jenista" <hiplain@flash.net> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 09:52:17 -0700   PipeChat wrote: > Subject: Re: ACCHOS > Date: Fri, 22 Aug 1997 > VERY much interested in the ACCH projects! >   Count me in! George Jenista 6134 Glenview Drive, #130 North Richland Hills, Texas 76180 817-428-3655 e-mail: hiplain@flash.net e-mail: hi-plains@juno.com  
(back) Subject: The correct name for Electric action chest magnets. From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@dave-world.net> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 11:27:13 -0700   On Friday, 22 Aug 1997 23:00:12 EDT, Roy Gutfinski <Roy.Gutfinski@ptbbs.dhs.state.me.us> writes:   > I understand that Wicks Organ Company has a proprietary interest in and > registered trademark on the name Direct Electric Action. What is the > proper term to use for the action on a non-Wicks organ that has > electrically operated chest magnets controlled by electrical connection > to the manuals and stop controls without any pneumatics between the > keys and chest magnets?   The generally accepted name for such an action is "Electro-Mechanical". However, you might be slightly confused: It doesn't have anything to do with the fact that the relaying mechanism is all-electric, so much as that the valve assembly itself is purely electro-mechanical. In other words: it's possible to be running such a valve with an electro-pneumatic relay system, and yet the action would still be termed "Electro-Mechanical".   It's good to be back on the list after a brief trip to Texas to take my middle son and his girlf-friend to college there!   Faithfully,   / ^ ^ \ { (O) (O) } --------oOOOo--------U-------oOOOo------------   "Arp in the Corn Patch" Rich Schneider SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders SNAILMAIL:41-43 Johnston Street P.O. Box 137 Kenney, Il 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX EMAIL: mailto:arpncorn@dave-world.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Electric action chest magnets. From: Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 12:39:05   At 11:00 PM 8/22/97 EDT, you wrote: >I understand that Wicks Organ Company has a proprietary interest in and >registered trademark on the name Direct Electric Action. What is the >proper term to use for the action on a non-Wicks organ that has >electrically operated chest magnets controlled by electrical connection >to the manuals and stop controls without any pneumatics between the keys >and chest magnets? >   Try "direct electric" small letters - everybody else does :-))))  
(back) Subject: Re: The correct name for Electric action chest magnets. From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 11:27:26 -0700   I thought Wicks *invented* the direct-electric pipe valve sometime in the mid 1900's? Somewhere I have a copy of their original U.S. Patent .. which is, itself, very interesting. So, they'd obviously have a proprietary interest.   Apparently Wicks retain the trademark on the phrase 'Direct-Electric', but I'd imagine any patents on the electromagnet valves themselves have long since expired. ??   So, how and when did Reisner and Peterson come to produce very similar pipe valves? I'd imagine Reisner originally licensed the design from Wicks?? Or, did they simply wait until the patent(s) expired?   Thanks Folks .. I remain in search of entirely useless Organ Trivia :)   P.S. While I'm here .. Thanks to all who answered my questions re: Protecting circuitry from electrical surges. Wow! I've learned a LOT and am immensely grateful to you!! Your information will probably save a few electronic relays too!   Ron Yost Paso Robles, CA  
(back) Subject: Re: The correct name for Electric action chest magnets. From: "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@interalpha.co.uk> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 20:15:44 +0100       ---------- > From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: The correct name for Electric action chest magnets. > Date: 23 August 1997 19:27 > > I thought Wicks *invented* the direct-electric pipe valve sometime in the > mid 1900's? Somewhere I have a copy of their original U.S. Patent .. which > is, itself, very interesting. So, they'd obviously have a proprietary > interest.   Dear all (from a new subscriber in England) Perhaps the following may be useful:   As luck would have it, I was sat on the loo today (!!) with my trusty copy of "The Contemporary American Organ" (WH Barnes 1959) and discovered a bit about Wick's and direct electric action. (does anyone else read on the loo out there? - or Is it a pastime for sad 30 something English Organists!) and I quote:(with due acknowledgement)   "An organ action known as the direct electric action has been invented by Louis J Wick of the Wicks Pipe Organ Co. of Highland, I ll." " We are able to furnish drawings of this mechanism taken from the patent specifications granted to mr Wick, November 19, 1929." " The first patent was granted in 1922 and the first direct electric actioned organ in 1914." "No other systems have been employed by Wicks since that time."   The article goes on to say that "JS & CH Odell Co of New York have also a direct electric action as well as the Estey Organ Co. of Brattleboro' Vt., and the Reuter Organ Co., which they sometimes employ in the case of small organs."   Further reading of the article gives a complete and consise specification of the details of the action as used by Wicks, with diagrams for the various sizes of magnet employed etc. The mere fact that the book refers to "direct electric action", but directly (!) applying the term to other builders' actions, would perhaps indicate to me that the words may not be patented and we can all sleep easy in our beds, sound in the mind that we are not doing anyone a huge disservice or that we are going to end up, as we say in England, in the slammer! Let's talk about something else!!   From organist@interalpha.co.uk.   > Apparently Wicks retain the trademark on the phrase 'Direct-Electric', but > I'd imagine any patents on the electromagnet valves themselves have long > since expired. ?? > > So, how and when did Reisner and Peterson come to produce very similar pipe > valves? I'd imagine Reisner originally licensed the design from Wicks?? > Or, did they simply wait until the patent(s) expired? > > Thanks Folks .. I remain in search of entirely useless Organ Trivia :) > > P.S. While I'm here .. Thanks to all who answered my questions re: > Protecting circuitry from electrical surges. Wow! I've learned a LOT and > am immensely grateful to you!! Your information will probably save a few > electronic relays too! > > Ron Yost > Paso Robles, CA > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: The correct name for Electric action chest magnets. From: "Jim Saenger" <chamade@Early.COM> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 97 13:34:10 PDT   I thought Gress-Miles used 'electro-mechanical' as their own at one point.   ---------- > On Friday, 22 Aug 1997 23:00:12 EDT, Roy Gutfinski > <Roy.Gutfinski@ptbbs.dhs.state.me.us> writes: > > > I understand that Wicks Organ Company has a proprietary interest in and > > registered trademark on the name Direct Electric Action. What is the > > proper term to use for the action on a non-Wicks organ that has > > electrically operated chest magnets controlled by electrical connection > > to the manuals and stop controls without any pneumatics between the > > keys and chest magnets? > > The generally accepted name for such an action is "Electro-Mechanical". > However, you might be slightly confused: It doesn't have anything to do > with the fact that the relaying mechanism is all-electric, so much as > that the valve assembly itself is purely electro-mechanical. In other > words: it's possible to be running such a valve with an > electro-pneumatic relay system, and yet the action would still be termed > "Electro-Mechanical". > > It's good to be back on the list after a brief trip to Texas to take my > middle son and his girlf-friend to college there! > > Faithfully, > > / ^ ^ \ > { (O) (O) } > --------oOOOo--------U-------oOOOo------------ > > "Arp in the Corn Patch" > Rich Schneider > SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. > Organbuilders > SNAILMAIL:41-43 Johnston Street > P.O. Box 137 > Kenney, Il 61749-0137 > (217) 944-2454 VOX > (217) 944-2527 FAX > EMAIL: mailto:arpncorn@dave-world.net > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Question on Piece Heroique From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 04:46:03   I asked this question on the other list some time ago, but I'm hoping that perhaps I'm addressing a few folks who didn't see it then.   I'm planning on playing Franck's Piece Heroique for Christ the King Sunday, November 23, which is the last Sunday before Advent. Since Occasional Organ 101 has been moved to the church newsletter, I want to say something about the piece, but aside from the usual stuff you read on record jackets, I can't find anything of substance on this piece. I'd like to know if Franck was inspired by some historic event in writing this piece. Why didn't he just call it Rhapsody in B? Any ideas or stories behind this piece?   TIA,   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Question on Piece Heroique From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 17:39:41 -0400   Vernon, When I write about a piece of music used as a voluntary in worship, I play and listen to the piece and see how the music speaks to me in a spiritual sense. One of the beauties of music is that it can many different things and be appropriate for many different occasions. The Piece Heroique is especially appropriate for Christ the King Sunday in that it portrays heroism in the form of persistence (the accompaniment) and majesty in the beauty of the melody. The driving rhythmic force of the piece can be symbolic of moving continually toward a goal. The following section with the dialog shows force against force, as well as the next part where the melody is echoed from voice to voice. The section beginning with the pedal (solo) is slightly contemplative, possibly indicating prayer and answered prayer, which then leads to the final victorious ending in the almost chorale-like statement, a very fitting representation of eternal glory. Again, this is something that will come from within, from your own contemplation of the piece. Another good piece for study in this way is the Three Chorales by Franck (used to represent the Trinity) Chorale I - majesty and love of the Father; Chorale II - persistence (passacaglia) and gentleness of the Son; Chorale III - the fire and comfort of the Holy Spirit. Bach's preludes and fugues are also loaded with symbolic ideas. Its rather fun to do, and my congregation has responded very positively to the write-ups that I have done in the bulletin.   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: The correct name for Electric action chest magnets. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 18:20:56 -0500 (CDT)   At 11:27 AM 8/23/97 -0700, Ron Yost wrote: >I thought Wicks *invented* the direct-electric pipe valve sometime in the >mid 1900's? Somewhere I have a copy of their original U.S. Patent .. which >is, itself, very interesting. So, they'd obviously have a proprietary >interest.   According to W. L. Sumner's book *The Organ*, the first attempt to apply electro-magnets to open the pallet valves of an organ directly goes back to the inventor of the electro-magnet himself, William Sturgeon, who conducted some experiments with his friend William Wilkinson, an organbuilder in Kendal, England in 1826. The English organist Henry J. Gauntlett (who wrote the tune to Mrs. Alexander's hymn "Once in Royal David's City") appears to have been the first to take out a patent on such an action in 1852. Dr. Gauntlett's 1852 patent is described on pp. 706-7 of the second volume of Audsley. The French organbuilders Du Moncel and Stein & Fils experimented with electro-mechanical actions and one was shown at the Paris Exhibition of 1885. Meanwhile the Germans were not to be outdone -- Carl Weigle applied an electro-mechanical action to the organ at Echterdingen, near Stuttgart in 1870, but it was not very successful. Another Englishman John Wesley Goundry patented a fairly successful version in 1863 (described by Audsley ii.708), and W. G. Trice, an Englishman working in Italy in the 1890's also had some success with electro-mechanical actions. The first organbuilder in the United States to use such an action appears to have been M. P. Moller of Hagerstown, Maryland, who in his 1898 catalog wrote: "In our larger organs we use our new improved tubular pneumatic action which gives a very prompt response to the touch of the keys. It is simple in construction, and is not affected by atmospheric changes, we use exclusively tinned tubing. This tubular pneumatic action can be used in Manual and Pedal and is a great advantage in reversible or extended consoles. We also use direct and electric pneumatic action."   It will be seen, therefore, that electro-mechanical actions had some history on both sides of the Atlantic even before the foundation of the Wicks firm in Highland, Illinois in 1906. The earliest Wicks organs did not have direct electric action, and there is an early Wicks instrument in St. Louis that originally had tubular pneumatic action. The firm soon got into building direct electric actions, however, and made a number of improvements in this type of action that were patented, mostly in the 1920's and 1930's. They also registered that splendid old "Wicks Direct Electric" logo which you see stamped on the pipes and consoles of their older instruments.   John    
(back) Subject: Re: How To Sing The Blues From: "Thomas E. Gregory" <tgregory@carroll1.cc.edu> Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 18:55:21 -0600 (CDT)   Greetings:   The following was forwarded to me by a previous pastor in our congregation. I hope that you enjoyit!   T. Gregory                       > > From owner-relhumor-list@LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU Thu Aug 21 19:02:28 EDT 1997 > > Mime-Version: 1.0 > > Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII > > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7BIT > > Priority: normal > > X-Mailer: Pegasus Mail for Windows (v2.54) > > Message-ID: <8CE3BDE4732@ri1.rodgers.rain.com> > > Date: Thu, 21 Aug 1997 15:54:29 PDT > > Reply-To: Religious humor discussion list > > <RELHUMOR-LIST@LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU> > > Sender: Religious humor discussion list > > <RELHUMOR-LIST@LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU> > > From: Mark Huth <mhuth@RODGERS.RAIN.COM> > > Organization: Rodgers Instrument Corp. > > Subject: Re: How To Sing The Blues (fwd) > > To: RELHUMOR-LIST@LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU > > In-Reply-To: <33FCC22F.D94E4678@shockware.com> > > > > > And why not. Methinks you can play de blues on any instrument. Even > > > dem new fangled Cassavants. > > > > > > Dat durn Boid > > > > > > Warning! Organ humor follows! > > > > > > I have a friend in Chicago who builds and maintains pipe organs. A > > few of the instruments he tunes regularly are Austin organs with > > universal wind chests and paddle tremulants (for non-organists, this > > means that there is a plank in the pipe organ chamber which is > > usually about 5" wide and 6-8 feet long which sits horizontally above > > the pipes. When the tremulant (vibrato) is activated, this plank > > spins round and round and creates the undulating sound you hear). > > > > Anyway, my friend Dean happened to be tuning an Austin recently > > while his wife was holding keys down at the console. She got > > a little bored and started looking at combination pistons on a > > different division, thinking it wouldn't affect anything he did. One > > of the pistons, however, activated the "general" tremulant, which > > Dean happened to be straddling at the time. > > > > He experienced pretty severe testicular distress for about five spins > > of the plank, then dropped his tuning knife, grabbed the plank and > > yelled in a voice about two octaves higher than normal, "TURN OFF THE > > TREMULANT!!!! TURN OFF THE TREMULANT!!!!" > > > > I'm sending him an athletic supporter with cup for Christmas. > > > > Mark > > > > > > > > Mark Huth > > Rodgers Instrument Corporation > > mhuth@rodgers.rain.com > > > > Inertia makes the world go round. > > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: How To Sing The Blues From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Sat, 23 Aug 1997 22:14:56 -0400 (EDT)   Tom.......THAT WAS PRICELESS!!!! thank you so much.   RandyT