PipeChat Digest #45 - Monday, August 25, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: Re: How To Sing The Blues From: "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@interalpha.co.uk> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 18:30:28 +0100       ---------- > From: SCoonrod@aol.com > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Re: How To Sing The Blues > Date: 24 August 1997 03:14 > > Tom.......THAT WAS PRICELESS!!!! thank you so much. > > RandyT > A fine tale, I say!   Just for amusement, I have to recount to you all about the time I was on holiday in Cornwall, England, and decided to go to the local country chruch for Evensong. The organist (an elderly lady) - no sexist comments implied or required - went to her instrument, in full view of the congregation.   As a student at the time, I watched intently, and was gratified to see her pull out the only pedal stop and thought "well, we are in for a treat"   All, however, was completly spoilt when she then started to play with one hand, promptly proceeding to hang her handbag over the drawn pedal stop!.........   Oh dear!  
(back) Subject: Lightning Protection Ideas From: "Robert E. Wilhelm, Jr." <wilhelre@sterlingdi.com> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 14:52:56 -0400   I've read with some interest about the effects of lightning striking churches and damaging the electronics equipment within the building including the organ. Lightning causes large surges in two ways. The first is when it strikes a power line somewhere. The dissipation of the energy runs into near by homes and buildings to seek a path to ground and in the process damages everything electrical in sight. The second method of creating damage is when the lightning strike is near a building. The lightning bolt itself generates a extremely high magnetic field around it. This magnetic field passes through the walls of the building, and as it is varying, it generates through EMF voltage on any wiring within the building. These generated voltages can be high enough at times to create damage to sensitive electronics. In fact, a power distribution system struck by lightning will be generating the same magnetic pulses and as such these magnetic pulses become the way for the lightning surge to be induced on other nearby wiring. Enough of the physics involved, a complete message could be written on just this subject.   The point I wanted to make is that protection by the surge device is nice, but often they simply are not enough. First, and unknown to most consumers is that the surge devices inside the units are rated in how much energy they can dissipate. The cheap units usually have lower rated devices inside than the more expensive ones do. Hit the "surge protector" with a spike less than its rating and it does a fairly good job of arresting it. Hit it with a greater than rated surge and the surge protection device inside the unit is history and effectively the unit is no longer working. Unfortunately most manufacturers do not put a surge rating (should be in joules) on their units (higher number is better).   As Maintenance Team Leader of the 3/66 Dickinson Kimball I can tell you what I have done there. It is quite simple. When the instrument is shut down, every connection of the organ to the AC power lines -- both the single phase ones and the three phase ones -- are opened with a relay. This includes the Neutral (white wire) AND the Ground (green wire) connections. We effectively isolate the organ's wiring from the rest of the building. By making this isolation, any surges in the building wiring, created for whatever reason, don't get to the organ unless it happens to be on when they occur. There are no surge suppressors on the instrument with one exception -- the board that starts the organ has to be connected to power all the time so it is very heavily surge protected and it has been designed with opto couplers to isolate it from the rest of the organ wiring.   Surge suppressors are nice, but they only work for a limited amount of time and they have ratings which usually are less than what is needed for the really big strikes. In fact the computer this message is being written on has a large relay on it that when I flip the switch, actually disconnects the three power leads going to it -- just like pulling the plug. If fact, I'm sure we all know of folks that religiously "pull the plugs" on their appliances and TVs where ever a lightning storm is near. This practice is far better than employing surge suppressors.   I know this practice and what we did at Dickinson works. Several years ago the school was directly struck in that the lightning bolt struck the pole outside where the building's underground feeders are attached. Took out everything electronic in the building. Phones, computers, alarm system, etc. It got the electronic lighting system that controls the house and stage lights in the auditorium where the pipe organ is located. If it was electronic in the school, and if it wasn't unplugged, it was toasted. The organ survived without incident. BTW -- the relay system is the most complex Z-Tronics system ever installed on a pipe organ and the combination action is a Trousdale system which is microprocessor based.   As we are in basically a steel building, protection from nearby strikes and the magnetic fields created is not something we really have worried about. The only protection for this is to install the wiring in steel conduits which are well grounded. In fact, being a public building everything is in steel conduit (not aluminum since the school was built in the late 50's). However, for churches that have an echo or similar organ divisions, I strongly recommend that the wiring to those divisions -- both power and all electronic signal lines -- be installed in STEEL conduit. That is the only way these long electrical conductors, if they are ever exposed to the magnetic fields of a near by lightning strike, won't generate sufficient electrical voltage by EMF to create a damaging surge. Many churches have their electronics damaged not due to a strike of the power lines, but rather a near by strike to the ground creating sufficient magnetic fields that the wiring to the steeple becomes a generator and causes the damage. When I'm talking of the steeple, I'm referring to the wiring associated with the carillon systems usually installed there (i.e. the bong-a-tron speakers!). I think a simple investigation of these areas of a church will uncover wiring that has just been "strung" to the steeple, remote organ divisions, etc.   Didn't intend for this to get this long but I hope the information provided is food for thought. The best solutions for protection are steel conduit installations and total isolation from the electrical service when not in use. Both are expensive to do and usually must be done when the system is installed but the added expense is many time less than the replacement and repair costs later down the road. Hope this helps.   Robert E. Wilhelm, Jr Maintenance Crew Leader 3/66 Dickinson Kimball (PS -- Delaware registered electrical engineer as well!)    
(back) Subject: "Direct Electric" or "direct-electric" From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@dave-world.net> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 17:18:29 -0700   On Sat, 23 Aug 1997 12:39:05 Nelson Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca> writes:   > Try "direct electric" small letters - everybody else does :-))))   I sure wouldn't! Maybe you can get away with that in Canada, as it would be probably harder for the Wicks company to prosecute infringement out of the country but at least here in the U.S., it's the phrase that's a registered trademark, not whether or not the first letters of each name are capitalized or not.   In other words: be VERY CAREFUL when using someone's trade name "generically".   Faithfully,   / ^ ^ \ { (O) (O) } --------oOOOo--------U-------oOOOo------------   "Arp in the Corn Patch" Rich Schneider SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders SNAILMAIL:41-43 Johnston Street P.O. Box 137 Kenney, Il 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX EMAIL: mailto:arpncorn@dave-world.net  
(back) Subject: Re: "Direct Electric" or "direct-electric" From: photom@ix.netcom.com Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 19:37:05 -0700   Richard Schneider wrote: > > On Sat, 23 Aug 1997 12:39:05 Nelson Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca> > writes: > > > Try "direct electric" small letters - everybody else does :-)))) > > I sure wouldn't! Maybe you can get away with that in Canada, as it > would be probably harder for the Wicks company to prosecute infringement > out of the country but at least here in the U.S., it's the phrase that's > a registered trademark, not whether or not the first letters of each > name are capitalized or not. > > In other words: be VERY CAREFUL when using someone's trade name > "generically". >     YES, use the phrase correctly. Wicks is very protective of that name. The OSI catalog, and Reisner has basically the same product, but they call it "Direct Vaulve Action" (and the model, C-3, D2, A-5 etc..) I used to use the Wick action name until I learned that it was their specific name, now I just use Direct Action, or Direct Vaulve Action.   -William C.  
(back) Subject: Re: Piece Heroique From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 10:36:22   While I found Bruce Cornely's interpretations very interesting, I wanted to mention that early on, when I first started listening to this piece, and I was thinking about wanting to learn it, I invented the following interpretation:   The piece is divided into 4 sections, described as follows: (1) Christ's march to Calvary; (2) flashback to earlier times, where we see Christ as a teacher, healer and friend; (3) return to Calvary and the Crucifixion; and, (4) the Resurrection.   In addition, I've invented a similar one with Christian motives, concentrating on the acceptance of Christ into one's life.   Interpretations can be fun! And the best part is that none of them is right or wrong!   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Piece Heroique From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 20:50:23 -0400   Vernon, thanks for the new slant. I would be interested in the other one upon which you did not elaborate. As an aside, one of my favorites is the prelude and fugue in b-minor (Bach), which is so dignified and stately in the prelude; this precision and majesty is carried into the fugue as well until the middle where Bach throws in the "circus" motif and seems to say, "Hey, don't take this stuff so seriously>" Thanks again.   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Searching for a piece. . . From: CDKrug@aol.com Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 22:36:04 -0400 (EDT)   Recently, my sister and I were paid extremely well to sing some thoroughly inappropriate show music at a wedding at the Presbyterian Church in nearby Blairstown, NJ.   (a French Classicly influenced pneumatic (I think) instrument w/ a 99 group aftermarket electronic combination action that I didn't get a chance to play so stop asking!)   During the prelude, the organist played a very English sounding march entitled "_________ Imperial." (If memory serves, the subtitle indicated that it was written for some coronation or another of one of those odd looking people with the big ears or some such tabloid fodder.)   ANYWAY--if anyone could suggest author/title/publication info, it would be much appreciated.     Thanx     Charles  
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for a piece. . . From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 21:41:02 -0500   SNIP >During the prelude, the organist played a very English sounding march >entitled > "_________ Imperial." (If memory serves, the subtitle indicated that it >was written for some coronation or another of one of those odd looking people >with the big ears or some such tabloid fodder.) > Most likely "CROWN IMPERIAL" by Walton. Written for GeorgeVI's coronation. There is a very good transcription for the organ but I don't remember who the publisher is.   David   ********************************** David Scribner Black Iris Consulting 4775 Balmoral Drive Pensacola, FL 32504-9174 850-478-9635 - Voice 850-476-0711 - Fax david@blackiris.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for a piece. . . From: Stephen F P Karr <karrlist@scescape.net> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 22:42:06 -0400 (EDT)   > "_________ Imperial."   >ANYWAY--if anyone could suggest author/title/publication info, it would be >much appreciated.   Perhaps "Crown Imperial" by someone named Walton? I've got a recording of it on a Simon Preston CD. No publication info, sorry.   -Stephen    
(back) Subject: Re: Piece Heroique From: "Dr. Peter G. Pocock" <pgpocock@ix.netcom.com> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 21:07:29 -0700   Hi Vernon,   Can you correct the date on your omputer it is showing as 7/28 when it comes through on messages and will certainly give people problems if they sort their email by date. Heaven forbid :):):) It may not be read by them :(:(   Take care,   Pete!    
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for a piece. . . From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 00:09:27 -0400   My copy of Crown Imperial is published by (who else) Oxford University Press.   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for a piece. . . From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 23:10:23 -0500 (CDT)   At 10:36 PM 8/24/97 -0400, Charles wrote:   >During the prelude, the organist played a very English sounding march >entitled > "_________ Imperial." (If memory serves, the subtitle indicated that it >was written for some coronation or another of one of those odd looking people >with the big ears or some such tabloid fodder.)   Could this be Sir William Walton's *Crown Imperial*, written for the coronation of King George VI in 1937? If so, it is published by Oxford University Press.   John    
(back) Subject: Connecting mike inputs to the pre-amp output of a CONN 624 From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@dave-world.net> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 1997 23:20:46 -0700   Dear Listers,   Please forgive the cross-posting, but I thought this might get me more prompt results than if I were to write to the three lists individually.   I am affiliated with a church that has a CONN Model 624 electronic that they would like to be able to connect into their Mixer board. The question becomes: how to do it?   Obviously, connecting to the speakers sends way too much signal into the inputs, so getting into the Pre-Amp section is the way to go.   Anyone have a schematic to show just where this is in the line-up of things in this particular beast?   I took a look for awhile, and didn't see anything resembling what I would have expected, such as an RCA jack into some kind of amp section.   Any help would be gratefully appreciated, but I would request private responses, so as to not distress the rest of the listers!   Thanks for the use of the bandwidth with this question.   Faithfully, / ^ ^ \ { (O) (O) } --------oOOOo--------U-------oOOOo------------   "Arp in the Corn Patch" Rich Schneider SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders SNAILMAIL:41-43 Johnston Street P.O. Box 137 Kenney, Il 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX EMAIL: mailto:arpncorn@dave-world.net   Who understands and works on trackers, EP, EM and about everything else organic (even HAMMONDS!), but NOT CONNS!  
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for a piece. . . From: PHarri5833@aol.com Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 03:19:37 -0400 (EDT)   Charles (=CDKrug@aol.com) asked about "a very English sounding march entitled "_________ Imperial."   Sounds like it could have been William Walton's march "Crown Imperial". Originally orchestral and written for the coronation of George VI. Oxford University Press have a handy arrangement for organ solo.   I afraid even we Brits are now tending to forget which royal marriage was to who!   Peter Harrison Emmanuel Church, Holcombe, GB