PipeChat Digest #48 - Wednesday, August 27, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: Re: Piece Heroique From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 14:56:01   Greetings from roasted Austin:   Hal Stover offered several comments regarding applying programs to music, for which I'd like to retaliate, er.. I mean, respond. ;-)   >OK, here's mine: ...4th section: The UAW wins a huge contract settlement from GM. Franck takes his windfall, chucks the job, moves to Vegas, and marries a showgirl.   Very amusing. No, really! And if that's what you want to think of when you hear PH, I say "More power to you!" As I said - no interpretation is wrong. A little silly or a little strange, perhaps, but you'll never hear me say it was wrong.   I stand by what I said - there is no right nor wrong interpretation, especially if the composer has not left notes indicating a program or inspiration that caused him to write that piece.   >Composers are not stupid and they generally tell us if they wish to have a program applied to a work eg Berioz' Symphonie Fantastique.   I don't claim to know all that much about Franck, but I figure that Vincent d'Indy did, since he wrote, "Anyone who happened to meet this man in the street, invariably in a hurry, invariably absent-minded and making grimaces, running rather than walking, dressed in an overcoat a size too large and trousers a size too short for him would never have suspected the transformation that took place when, seated at the piano, he explained or commented upon some fine composition, or, with one hand to his forehead and the other poised above his stops, prepared the organ for one of his great improvisations." From this description, I would be hard pressed to believe that he meticulously prepared notes for his compositions to assure his audience that there was no program associated with them, or that there was. To me, Franck was not your typical composer, for which we can all be thankful - time spent writing program notes is time spent away from the composition desk, and I'm glad he just left us to our imaginations.   >IMHO inventing superfluous stories about pieces, even those with noble plot lines, will delay or even prevent an interpreter's apprehension of the message of a work at its deepest level and ultimately does a disservice to performer, composer, and listener.   I don't know if I'd go that far, but I agree with you that there is program music, and there is non-program music. But I was trying to apply a program to PH for two reasons: (1) I am introducing this piece to a church congregation which is almost totally unschooled in organ music, mostly because previous organists have not felt it was worth their time trying to educate them and help them enjoy the music (hence, my creation of Occasional Organ 101), and (2) I was trying to link this piece with something remotely religious, since religious aspects of a composer and his music make more of an impression on the congregation than just playing a piece and letting them fall asleep or ignore it. I asked for help here, and I'm glad to say I got it. If I were playing this piece in Boston or New York, where there are audiences who appreciate classical organ music, I wouldn't say a word, but this is Austin, where I've been asked (by a bride who was preparing for her wedding) "Tell me - just what's the difference between the piano and the organ?" Say, what??? >Vernon, put down thy crutch and walk!   Don't tell me where to put my crutch! ;-)   >Cheers, Harold   Clink! \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Piece Heroique From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 08:55:12 -0400   Vernon, I play in a University church and am interested in your "Occasional Organ 101". Our service order has recently been changed resulting in the opportunity for an extended prelude of about 10 or 15 minutes, following by chiming of the hour (handbells), and then a 5 minute prelude followed by the service. What do you do in OO-101? This sounds like an interesting academic approach to educating students and the general congregation al well. I think this is interesting discussion material and there are alot of intelligent people on the list who could give valuable input, but if you're "heat sensitive" contact me privately! Thanks.   Organist, University United Methodist Church and Student Center Gainesville, Florida (UF, SFCC)   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Cleaning Wurlitzer Style Key contacts From: jkautz@ebicom.net (Jerrell Kautz) Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 08:44:57 -0500   What is the best way to "clean" existing Wurlitzer key contacts while the keyboards are apart? Any special procedure to try out?    
(back) Subject: Theatre Organ Home Page Address Update From: jkautz@ebicom.net (Jerrell Kautz) Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 09:14:37 -0500   As many of you have probably already noticed, the THEATRE ORGAN HOME PAGE now has its own domain name, http://theatreorgans.com and while the old links and addresses should still work, i.e. http://wcbi.com/organs/, they will eventually be discontinued.   So when you have some free time, update your links and bookmarks and try to remember our easy-to-remember location on the net THEATREORGANS.COM         At 09:40 AM 8/27/97 -0400, Terry Charles wrote: >Sorry folks, thanks to Roger Brown - here are the >CORRECT addresses for the Kirk of Dunedin, its >Sanctuary interior and 4/100 console in its concert >position with the six page specification: > >The link is actually http://www.wcbi.com/organs and the URL to go >direct to the Kirk page is http://theatreorgans.com/florida/kirk/ > >Come to Florida and hear its best kept organ secret! > >TC > >    
(back) Subject: The Carmelite Priory From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 10:44:20 -0400   I must thank all the people who took the time to answer my queries about the Carmelite Priory in London and also regarding Colin Mawby, the organist on the LP that I have of the Carmelite Priory Choir singing the Monteverdi Magnificat.   Although the Carmelite Priory still remains somewhat un-resolved, - due to rather conflicting information, I know enough about the LP to give it a fairly informed introduction during my radio programme next Sunday morning.   I had well over a dozen answers to my questions, both private e-mail and via the two lists, and I would like to thank you all for the combined information.   Just in case you are in the listening area of CFRC-FM the programme is called "Musical Panorama" - a regular Sunday morning programme from 8.00 am to noon, for which I am "filling-in" to allow the usual host, Arthur Zimmerman a short break for the Labour Day weekend.       Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Organic DeeJay Emeritus, - mostly! CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA    
(back) Subject: Re: Cleaning Wurlitzer Style Key contacts From: John Moore <john_moore@ibm.net> Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 10:47:14 -0400       Jerrell Kautz wrote:   > What is the best way to "clean" existing Wurlitzer key contacts while the > keyboards are apart? Any special procedure to try out?   For electrical contacts of any type, I suggest you check out the products manufactured by Caig Labs in San Diego. Check their web page at http://www.caig.com or call them at (619) 451-1799. Their e-mail address is mailto: caig123@aol.com   I have no connection with the company or its distributors, but have been using their products in critical audio and control applications for years and have been WELL satisfied!      
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning Protection Ideas Astron Rectifiers From: Roy.Gutfinski@ptbbs.dhs.state.me.us Date: 27 Aug 1997 12:32:14 EDT   PI>A big Thank you to   PI>>Robert E. Wilhelm, Jr PI>>Maintenance Crew Leader PI>>3/66 Dickinson Kimball PI>>(PS -- Delaware registered electrical engineer as well!)   PI> for your excellent ideas.   PI>Regarding Astron Rectifiers- and probably a lot of other makes as well.   PI>Peterson Electro-Musical Products recommend removing the small wire that PI>grounds the negative output terminal to "Earth ground" on these rectifiers. PI>As Mr Wilhelm stated the ground loop effect can cause serious damage to PI>solid state equipment.   PI>Peterson has written a special note about this and other suggestions as to PI>how to prevent lightning damage to their equipment and other hardware. PI>(Peterson has worked hard in this area and warrents their equipment against PI>indirect surges and lightning strikes for 10 years.) Give them a call or PI>visit their web site for more info.     PI>Individual MOV's are available from your local Radio Shack store in various PI>sizes and voltages and can be easily installed on just about any electronic PI>equipment.   PI>For a couple of bucks it's well worth the effort to install them.   PI>now for an "oldy but goody" from me a while back     PI> Insurance on organs.   PI> Last week we had a major thunderstorm pass though our city and one of my PI> churches was hit by lightning. The blast took out the air conditionin PI> system and all the 3-phase power to the church. including the organ PI> ( the regular 120 /240 volt lines were untouched). The hydro lines com PI> into the church and the poles outside were burned to a crisp. Luckily a PI> number of eyewitnesses called the Fire Dept. and the fires were soon PI> out. However due to a mix up in the reporting of the fire to church PI> officials. No one knew in the church for 3 days what had happened! An PI> A/C serviceman just said that the A/C needed new motors and they wou PI> installed later that week! And a security systems serviceman simply s PI> that the security system was out of order due to voltage surges in t PI> area! 3 Days after the incident we were called in by the organist w PI> said " the organ won't start" Once I found out that the security PI> was off line and the A/C was dead I began to suspect that something big PI> amiss. Only after I went outside around the back of the church to see PI> there was no 3 phase hydro to the church did I find that there were no PI> wires! leading to the church! And just a pile of burnt embers where they PI> entered the church.   PI> "Holy screw-ups! Batman"   PI> - Later we found out that the police and fire dept. had tried to call t PI> church officials but the minister was on vacation and the " caretaker PI> the fire dept's list had died 5 years ago!   PI>Just a reminder to never assume that things are just a minor problem.   PI>   PI> Remember Pipe organs and churches are expensive things to replace (not PI>including your home and families). PI> Make sure you have adequate insurance on the organ, building and cont PI> Pipe organs in Canada are usually valued at $13,000.00+ a stop nowadays PI> Casavant quality instruments. So be forewarned if you don't keep up you PI> insurance you may find yourself without a church, organ , or money to PI> rebuild. And Please let your local fire and police dept's. know who to PI> contact in case of emergencies!!!   PI>P.S. ` The organ has a Peterson Switching System on it and it survived PI>without any damage. The motors on the Air Conditioning system PI>reduced to SLAG.     PI>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PI>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics PI>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org PI>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org PI>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org PI>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   RE: Protection from Lightning and other types of Surges   The MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) typically used in the AC input circuit of various electronic equipment is the size of a nickel and rated for a energy absorption of perhaps 20 to 50 joules of electrical energy or for a peak (instantaneous) current of perhaps 3,000 to 5,000 amperes. Since most of these devices are chosen with a clamping voltage of only 20% to 50% above the working (line) voltage, they are fairly continuously exposed to events (surges) up to their design limit. Thus, they fail after a few years. Failure merely causes them to exhibit an open circuit status at all time, even when exposed to the high voltage transient events they are supposed to control. You do not know when the device has failed unless you remove it from the circuit, apply a high voltage, and check it with instrumentation to see if the resistance increases when exposed to the HV transient. Some of them will actually burn up when they fail as a result of an extreme overload. Most of them, however, just sit there and look like they did when they are new.   In my equipment and line inputs I use MOV's with a much higher rating. They are typically the size of a pack of cigarettes and mount with screws inside a metal box next to my line inputs and next to my service entrance panel. The ones I use on my service entrance panel are rated for 275 volts RMS, an energy of 950 joules, and a peak current rating of 50,000 amperes. They will last orders of magnitude longer than the little coin-sized jobs you will find in TV sets and those multiple-outlet surge suppressor strips.   Roy in Maine  
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning Protection Ideas From: John Moore <john_moore@ibm.net> Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 13:21:33 -0400   Roy Gutfinski wrote:   > The MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) typically used in the AC input circuit of > various electronic equipment is the size of a nickel and rated for a > energy absorption of perhaps 20 to 50 joules of electrical energy or for > a peak (instantaneous) current of perhaps 3,000 to 5,000 amperes. Since > most of these devices are chosen with a clamping voltage of only 20% to > 50% above the working (line) voltage, they are fairly continuously > exposed to events (surges) up to their design limit. Thus, they fail > after a few years. Failure merely causes them to exhibit an open > circuit status at all time, even when exposed to the high voltage > transient events they are supposed to control. You do not know when the > device has failed unless you remove it from the circuit, apply a high > voltage, and check it with instrumentation to see if the resistance > increases when exposed to the HV transient. Some of them will actually > burn up when they fail as a result of an extreme overload. Most of > them, however, just sit there and look like they did when they are new. > > In my equipment and line inputs I use MOV's with a much higher rating. > They are typically the size of a pack of cigarettes and mount with > screws inside a metal box next to my line inputs and next to my service > entrance panel. The ones I use on my service entrance panel are rated > for 275 volts RMS, an energy of 950 joules, and a peak current rating of > 50,000 amperes. They will last orders of magnitude longer than the > little coin-sized jobs you will find in TV sets and those > multiple-outlet surge suppressor strips.   If you're serious about surge protection (and when what you're protecting is valuable, you should be), visit this web site http://www.brickwall.com and look around. Their products aren't really meant for service entrance applications, and if you've been used to spending $20 for a "surge suppressor" (which really isn't) their price will tend to cause "sticker shock!" On the other hand, they have an impressive story to tell about their Underwriters' Laboratory tests, and their technology is different from what we've grown accustomed.    
(back) Subject: Re: Lightning Protection Ideas From: Roy.Gutfinski@ptbbs.dhs.state.me.us Date: 27 Aug 1997 13:41:56 EDT   PI>Roy Gutfinski wrote:   PI>> The MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) typically used in the AC input circuit of PI>> various electronic equipment is the size of a nickel and rated for a PI>> energy absorption of perhaps 20 to 50 joules of electrical energy or for PI>> a peak (instantaneous) current of perhaps 3,000 to 5,000 amperes. Since PI>> most of these devices are chosen with a clamping voltage of only 20% to PI>> 50% above the working (line) voltage, they are fairly continuously PI>> exposed to events (surges) up to their design limit. Thus, they fail PI>> after a few years. Failure merely causes them to exhibit an open PI>> circuit status at all time, even when exposed to the high voltage PI>> transient events they are supposed to control. You do not know when the PI>> device has failed unless you remove it from the circuit, apply a high PI>> voltage, and check it with instrumentation to see if the resistance PI>> increases when exposed to the HV transient. Some of them will actually PI>> burn up when they fail as a result of an extreme overload. Most of PI>> them, however, just sit there and look like they did when they are new. PI>> PI>> In my equipment and line inputs I use MOV's with a much higher rating. PI>> They are typically the size of a pack of cigarettes and mount with PI>> screws inside a metal box next to my line inputs and next to my service PI>> entrance panel. The ones I use on my service entrance panel are rated PI>> for 275 volts RMS, an energy of 950 joules, and a peak current rating of PI>> 50,000 amperes. They will last orders of magnitude longer than the PI>> little coin-sized jobs you will find in TV sets and those PI>> multiple-outlet surge suppressor strips.   PI>If you're serious about surge protection (and when what you're protecting is PI>valuable, you should be), visit this web site http://www.brickwall.com and PI>around. Their products aren't really meant for service entrance application PI>if you've been used to spending $20 for a "surge suppressor" (which really i PI>their price will tend to cause "sticker shock!" On the other hand, they hav PI>impressive story to tell about their Underwriters' Laboratory tests, and the PI>technology is different from what we've grown accustomed.     PI>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PI>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics PI>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org PI>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org PI>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org PI>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   Hello,   Yes, I am familiar with Price Wheeler. They use a massive inductor with capacitors in a system that is in series with the line input rather than parallel as with MOV's. I haven't used one of their devices yet. They do make a "wired in" version for up to a 20 amp load than runs for about $100. I'm going to try one as a sample. Even Price Wheeler admits, if you read their literature, that, while the inductor has a theoretically infinite life, the capacitors will eventually fail and need to be replaced.   Roy in Maine  
(back) Subject: Re: guests provide surprise... From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 14:11:28 -0400 (EDT)   I've seen it Terry, quite a while ago. Good info. hope you don't mind. I didn't do it though :-)   RandyT  
(back) Subject: No Subject From: Mewzishn@aol.com Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 17:39:03 -0400 (EDT)   (I think) Bruce Cornely wrote:   >>At the evening service, at "altar call", the minister said, "while the organ >>plays quietly..."   To which the official organists union response is, "Go ahead, let it! I'll be out back smoking a cigarette. Let me know when you want _me_ to play the organ quietly."   : )   Ken Sybesma  
(back) Subject: Re: No Subject From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 18:18:33   At 17:39 08/27/97 -0400, Ken Sybesma wrote: >(I think) Bruce Cornely wrote: > >>>At the evening service, at "altar call", the minister said, "while the >organ >>>plays quietly..." > >To which the official organists union response is, "Go ahead, let it! I'll be >out back smoking a cigarette. Let me know when you want _me_ to play the >organ quietly."     To which the business administrator of the non-unionized church says, "Go ahead, enjoy your cigarette! We'll just let the MIDI play for the whole service!"   :)   (I'm still subscribed, folks, and in semi-lurk mode.... I'm one of you now.) :)   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Forwarded message: Pump Organ From: "Dr. Peter G. Pocock" <pgpocock@ix.netcom.com> Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 17:06:26 -0700   This message was received by Pipechat admin from our homepage. If anyone can help Donald, please reply privately, as he is not a list member.   Thanks,   Pete!     Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 18:52:57 -0500 From: Donald Mankin <drmankin@arkansas.net> Reply-To: drmankin@arkansas.net X-Mailer: Mozilla 3.01C-KIT (Win95; U) To: admin@pipechat.org Subject: pump organ Sender: <admin@pipechat.org> List-Software: LetterRip 2.0 by Fog City Software, Inc. List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:requests@pipechat.org?subject=unsubscribe%20admin>   I have a Kimball pump organ that I have had for 10 years. I would like to see about getting it cleaned up and fixed up. It is in good shape now but I would like it to work really well. I live close to Memphis Tennessee. I would appreciate any help that you could give me. My address is: drmankin@arkansas.net Thank you, Donald Mankin        
(back) Subject: Tampa Bay Area Bound From: "basset3@warwick.net" <u1005593@warwick.net> Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 21:07:04 -0700   I play as a substitute organist for different churches (that way I get to play and experience a variety of organs, am not tied down, and can take off if if I choose). I will be in the Tampa Bay area Sept. 16-21 and would appreciate the opportunity to visit with any organists, however briefly, and hear their instruments. I studied pipe organ at the Univ. of Houston (early 70's) as an elective and have enjoyed playing for services since. Please respond to my e-mail address rather than tie up pipechat any further: basset3@warwick.net Thanks . . . Robert Clooney  
(back) Subject: Re: Tampa Bay Area Bound From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 21:56:20 -0400   Greetings, I also studied at UH in the early 70's with Dr. Jones. If you are driving to Tampa you will probably pass through gainesville on (I-75). If you would like a rest, I would be more than happy to show you around town. Of course, you will want to see the 3/16 Wicks that I get to play each week; there are some "slightly" more interesting organs such as the 3-42 Visser- Rowland at Holy Trinity, 2/24 Kinzey- Angerstein at First Lutheran, 1/9 A David Moore at First Presbyterian (chapel), 3/30+ Casavant at First Baptist, and the 5/?? Skinner/AEolian - Skinner/Moller at the University; and if we play our cards right (and you are interested ) maybe we can get into the carillon on campus. Please let me know if you have time to stop. I am always glad to give "the tour". bruce   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Tampa Bay Area Bound From: "Hugh F Drogemuller" <hdrogemuller@wwdc.com> Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 21:55:10 -0400   Robert. How about sharing your impressions of the organs that you visit , when you return. Thanks.   ---------- > From: basset3@warwick.net <u1005593@warwick.net> > To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Tampa Bay Area Bound > Date: August 28, 1997 12:07 AM > > I play as a substitute organist for different churches (that way I get > to play and experience a variety of organs, am not tied down, and can > take off if if I choose). I will be in the Tampa Bay area Sept. 16-21 > and would appreciate the opportunity to visit with any organists, however   > briefly, and hear their instruments. I studied pipe organ at the Univ. > of Houston (early 70's) as an elective and have enjoyed playing for > services since. Please respond to my e-mail address rather than tie up > pipechat any further: basset3@warwick.net > Thanks . . . Robert Clooney > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: Re: Tampa Bay Area Bound From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 22:13:33 -0400   Yikes! Wrong button. The Tampa bay reply was supposed to have been private, but, what the heck, you're all invited.   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: organs playing quietly From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 22:19:18 -0400   The responses to this remind me of the story of EP Biggs when a younger organist (I believe I was told, and this is legend/myth), he was asked by a minister to play softly while the minister crossed the chancel; Biggs allegedly replied , "why don't you just mumble something?"   Don't know how true this is, but I've always gotten a laugh from it (even though I loooooove playing "back-up" during prayers, etc. It makes me feel so..... DeMillish!   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for a piece. . . From: CDKrug@aol.com Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 22:23:36 -0400 (EDT)   Gee, I guess the piece must be "Crown Imperial" by Walton, published by OUP.   Thanx to all.     Charles  
(back) Subject: Anyone interested in a FAQ list? From: CDKrug@aol.com Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 22:34:51 -0400 (EDT)   Have we ever considered adding a FAQ list?   If there is collective interest, I would consider contributing.   I'm thinking along the lines of many of us contributing material, not just one or two.   Any interest?     Charles  
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for another piece. . . From: CDKrug@aol.com Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 22:39:37 -0400 (EDT)   Okay, you guys knew the last one. Now for a harder(I think) one.   My mom had an old recording of "Carol of the Bells"   (Hark, how the bells sweet silver bells etc etc etc)   The routine was roughly as follows:   chorus I: Solo reed plays melody over a sustain chord background, (a gemshorn-y sort of stop on the recording)   chorus II: Sort of a 16th note variation of the melody   chorus III: Toccatta on the melody, too complex for me to remember   chorus IV: Melody transposed to major mode, pedals & LH are accenting 1st beat.   Anyone familier w/ this recording/arrangement.  
(back) Subject: Q re recording of Nalle's "All the Things You Are" From: patmai@juno.com (Patricia R. Maimone) Date: Wed, 27 Aug 1997 23:03:22 -0400   Hello, PIPECHATTERS (including lurking Shirley :-),   While I listen to Dvorak's "New World Symphony" being broadcast on PBS it seems like a good time to inquire if our experts know of any available recordings of Billy Nalle's trio sonata arrangement of "All the Things You Are, " either by Nalle himself or someone else who performs it very well.. I remember reading about the great success that work had when it was premiered..   Shirley, I hope that things will become less stressful for you soon. Thank you for your yeoman (gender neutral, I trust ;-) or please supply an appropriate alternate descriptive adjective... it is late here in the East!) efforts in starting and maintaining this list with Peter!   Pat M.