PipeChat Digest #52 - Friday, August 29, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ Society From: RMalone796@aol.com Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 08:03:56 -0400 (EDT)   Yes I would like to become a member of the ACCHOS. I am Richard E. Malone 12 Sycamore Avenue, Bradford. BD72QE England.   E-Mail RMALONE796@AOL.COM   D.O.B. December 2 1940. Regards Richard  
(back) Subject: Still more Piece Heroique From: Harold Stover <Stovorg@worldnet.att.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 12:34:34 +0000   . . . being a continuation of the ongoing discussion between Vernon Moeller and yours truly about performer-supplied programs for ostensibly abstract works:   As I said yesterday, I heartily endorse Vernon's effort to educate his listeners about organ music in an era of a general decline in cultural literacy, even while deploring his efforts to apply his own plot lines to works with no indication of any intent to do the same from the composer. In the case of Piece Heroique, I don't contend that it is purely abstact music, not with that adjective in the title. I suggest that a better approach to educating a congregation about the piece is not to consider some made-up story about Jesus, but rather to consider the real story of the man Cesar Franck, and to then encourage the listeners, be they NYC sophisticates or Austin TX novitiates, to draw their own conclusions. Despite a rather uneventful outward life, Franck's music suggests an inner life of great activity and not a little turbulence. (BTW this includes, according to some writers, the possiblility of an adulterous affair with his protege Augusta Holmes, not that you'd find that in Vincent d'Indy's hagiographic portrait of "Pater Seraphicus". Franck's wife found the f minor quintet so queasily erotic that she refused to listen to it, having a pretty good idea by the 1880s that the sentiments expressed therein were not being directed to her - tell 'em THAT in Austin, Vernon!) I think that it is perfectly legitimate to find out as much as we can about a composer's personality and life story, and to apply that to our interpretation of his/her works. The classic examples of life effecting art might be Beethoven's deafness, Tchaikovsky's mental torture over his homosexuality, Shostakovich's oppression by a tyrannical government, Vierne's blindess and ill health, or the devout Catholicism of composers as disparate as Bruckner and Messiaen. In Franck's case, his long struggle to achieve compositional mastery and public recognition serves as a better jumping-off point for an understanding of PH than any spurious plot lines. And that is NOT to say that we should then construct a plot for PH based on Franck's own life, only that we'll be able to play it better (or listen to it more intently) if we know something about the flesh-and-blood person who, one day long ago, put those black dots down on that white paper. IMHO it is also disingenuous to assign religious motives to composers just because their music may awaken spiritual feelings in us. The best example of this is Ralph Vaughan Williams, a composer whose music I have deeply loved all of my life, who seldom fails to express metaphysical realities to me, and whose sacred music I use over and over again with my choir. RVW, despite his track record as a "spiritual" composer wavered constantly during his long life between outright atheism and what his wife described as a "cheerful agnosticism", and who drew poetic, not religious, inspiration from the King James Bible, Bunyan's "Pilgirm's Progress", the poetry of George Herbert, and the other great religious texts that he set so memorably. To pretend that he was an orthodox believer or that his music is about something that it is not misses a certain subtlety in the whole scope of his work and does not render it any less powerful. Our dumbed-down era may be a poor time to try to talk about this kind of stuff to a congregation, but IMHO we also owe music which has inspired us a little honesty. Cheers, Harold PS to Vernon: Your parishioner who asked about the difference between an organ and a piano just deserves a simple, straight answer about both instruments and music. Her lack of prior knowledge is no excuse to mislead her about a composer's intentions. Our listeners all come to us with varying degrees of sophistication but none should be the victims of our condescension. I say give people the benefit of the doubt about their capacity to grow and learn.    
(back) Subject: Re: Death Ray, Falling Plaster, etc. From: George.Greene@rossnutrition.com Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 10:10:59 -0400   The stories about Bruce's "Death Ray" stop and Richard's falling plaster brought some chuckles but they also sort of hit me between the eyes (or between the ears.) Early this year, my church obtained a Saville 7228 from Northwest United Methodist Church in Columbus. There is nothing wrong with the Saville (everything works), but Northwest had decided to purchase a new Allen with all the bells and whistles and I was happy to take the Saville off their hands. Art Spahr of Spahr Organ Service in Cincinnati did a very nice job of setting up the Saville in our sanctuary, which is fairly small (seating capacity about 200 if everybody is REALLY friendly.)   On the first couple of Sundays with the "new" organ, I was like a child at Christmas, and I must have totally overwhelmed the congregation. (Hey, I HAD to show them that the Saville could sound different from the old Conn, didn't I?) Anyway, my wife saw one person actually put his fingers in his ears during the offertory; the sound tech said that he could feel the back wall of the sanctuary shaking, and the minister and choir confirmed that the 16' and 32' principal stops made them think that we were having an earthquake (due to the vibration in the platform.) We recently moved some of the twenty-five speakers to a location directly behind the console where I could hear the "aural assault" that I have been inflicting on the congregation for the past eight months, and I have cut the volume back CONSIDERABLY.   Our church board recently decided to start a visitation program for families living in the immediate neighborhood of the church. One board member said that they could break the ice by saying, "We're sure that you have heard our new organ by now, even though you have not visited the church!" And I tell everyone that I have inventoried the cracks in the windows to make sure that I do not get blamed for any that existed prior to the Saville.   As for the Saville, I am amazed at what they were able to do with 1970's-era technology (I never realized that an electronic organ, even modern ones with digital sampling, etc., could sound that good), and I catch myself looking for the pipe chambers occasionally. Back in Saville's heyday, a friend of mine was organist at a church that purchased one and I couldn't figure out why they bought what I then thought was an "off-brand" organ; now I understand!   Anyway, I'm having loads of fun with the Saville (the wife says that she's an "organ widow" these days) and most of the folks at church seem to enjoy it now that I've "toned down" a bit. In the next couple of years they plan to build a much larger sanctuary, so I'll be able to open up a little more and my beloved Saville should sound even better.   2222222 2 George Greene, Senior Chemist 2222222 Analytical Research and Development 2 Abbott Laboratories, Ross Products Division 2222222 D104115-RP4-2 GGGGGGGG 625 Cleveland Avenue G Columbus, Ohio 43215 o G GGGG Voice 614-624-3362, FAX 614-624-7270 _`\ <._ G G George.Greene@RossNutrition.Com (_)/ (_) GGGGGGGG   ....and Organist, Sunbury Church of the Nazarene, Sunbury, OH.    
(back) Subject: A Reminder about IRC #PipeChat. From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 10:12:07 -0400   To all Pipechat-l members.   We shall be "on-air" live again this evening, (God willing and the Wind blows Fair), on Anothernet IRC from 9.00 pm EDT until we all get too sleepy to continue.   We are very much alive and kicking, - and our thanks go to Shirley and Pete, who have done all the hard work of getting the #pipechat channel all set up, - Dan and I hope to be able to keep the chat going on Mondays and Fridays.   9.00 pm on Anothernet Mondays and Fridays.   To do this, we need you all to come on line with us, otherwise the channel will just fade into oblivion - and we don't want that to happen!   Chat with you all tonight,   Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Organic DeeJay Emeritus, - mostly! CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA    
(back) Subject: Re: A Reminder about IRC #PipeChat. From: kow987@dice.nwscc.sea06.navy.mil (Kenneth O. Woods) Date: Fri, 29 Aug 97 9:22:58 EST   And could you remind us about a few of the particulars of using IRC. I seem to recall some instructions Shirley put out a while back. TIA -- Kenneth O. Woods kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil  
(back) Subject: IRC Chats From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 10:48:37 -0400   Regarding the post this morning about further information on # PipeChat IRC chat.   I came across this in my Pipechat mailbox! Fortunately I had not deleted it. It is from Shirley, our guide and mentor at that time. She answers the questions much more knowledgably than I could!   Bob Conway   >From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> >Subject: IRC Chats > >Hiya, folks!!!! > > As you know, we get together for an informal time of real-time text >chatting every Monday and Friday at 9:00 PM EDT (-0400 GMT). I have come >across some additional information about the network where we chat that >might be of interest to you. > > Servers: > together.vt.us.another.net > together-2.vt.us.another.net > neato.ca.us.another.net > sunrise.ca.us.another.net > dragon.ne.us.another.net > !hacker.another.net > >Ports are 6667 and 7000. Therefore it would appear there are 12 ways to >get onto AnotherNet. I was also told to "not be afraid to try 6668 and >6669" as well. > > Hope this helps all of you in getting online. > > Once connected, type /join #pipechat, and voila! > > > --Shirley    
(back) Subject: IRC Chats From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 10:55:54 -0400   To all interested Pipechat-l members.   If this has gone out twice, I apologise, but I thought that you all might like to see what Shirley told us to do when she was our Guide and Mentor!   Bob Conway. > >Date: Fri, 16 May 1997 14:09:00 -0400 (EDT) >X-Sender: pnst@popmail.voicenet.com >To: pipechat@pipechat.org >From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> >Subject: IRC Chats > >Hiya, folks!!!! > > As you know, we get together for an informal time of real-time text >chatting every Monday and Friday at 9:00 PM EDT (-0400 GMT). I have come >across some additional information about the network where we chat that >might be of interest to you. > > Servers: > together.vt.us.another.net > together-2.vt.us.another.net > neato.ca.us.another.net > sunrise.ca.us.another.net > dragon.ne.us.another.net > !hacker.another.net > >Ports are 6667 and 7000. Therefore it would appear there are 12 ways to >get onto AnotherNet. I was also told to "not be afraid to try 6668 and >6669" as well. > > Hope this helps all of you in getting online. > > Once connected, type /join #pipechat, and voila! > > --Shirley>    
(back) Subject: Re: Still more Piece Heroique From: Ronnymn@aol.com Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 11:10:46 -0400 (EDT)   Harold, you've got attitude. A good attitude!  
(back) Subject: Re: Disguised Music From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 09:14:04   For those of us not in the Anglican Church and living on this side of the big pond, would somebody please explain the reason for incredulity at an organist playing "War March of the Priests" (from Athalia?) by Mendelssohn? Is there some hidden meaning behind it, known only to our British friends? Would it be like me playing "Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life" as a postlude over here, knowing full well the connation brought to it by the Mel Brooks' comedy "Young Frankenstein" and the numerous snickers it would elicit?   Don't get me wrong - I'm not objecting to anything here. It's just that from what I've been reading on the list, there must be some hidden hilarity in this piece. Granted, I see the humor (worthy of a wry smile, IMHO, but certainly not guffaws) when an organist plays a piece with such a title in the presence of "men of God," but is there something more to it that I don't readily see? BTW, I play it at least twice each year as a postlude, mostly because I like it and folks recognize it.   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Piece Heroique From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 10:52:00   Continuing the thread on interpretation and Franck's Piece Heroique:   >IMHO the fact that the composer has not left notes is by itself an >indication that none are to be applied by others (and BTW I write this as a >composer as well as an organist)   Well, I still think it makes it a little more fun for those who are very inexperienced with classical music in general, and organ music in particular. I think once you get such people 'hooked', that you can then try to expand their horizons a bit by suggesting to them that just as visual art such as paintings and sculptures exist for their own sake, so too does music, and that not all music is programmatic. BTW, I've dabbled in music composition, too, and have assured those who have heard my music and encouraged me to send it to a publisher that I will include a line or two with each piece saying what inspired its creation. One piece in particular never fails to remind me of the long, lonely roads I travelled in western Ireland a number of years ago and, indeed, my memories of that time were in the back of my mind when I was working on that piece.   >Ah, but Vernon, he DID tell us when he wanted us to associate a piece with a >program (see "Psyche" and "Le Chasseur Maudit", to name two.)   Did he actually prepare program notes, or did he limit such extra work to an appropriate title? I'm not familiar with "Psyche," but I've heard the other work numerous times and enjoy it tremendously. Giving a work a suggestive title leaves the audience to be creative about what, if anything, is going on 'behind' the music. Remember Debussy's piano preludes in 2 books - I believe they were numbered by the composer, but the suggested titles were assigned by Durand, and placed, interestingly enough, at the conclusion of each piece, i.e., "Delphic Dances," and "Footsteps in the Snow." Of course, the pieces are known by those suggested titles now, and can anybody listen to "The Girl with the Flaxen Hair" without picturing, at least once, a girl with long, golden hair being blown by a breeze? I think it's too deeply ingrained into our musical psyches.   This all reminds me of a cartoon I saw in MAD magazine a number of years ago, when I was a kid, which depicted two schoolkids seated at home in front of the TV, watching Bernstein as he explained that it was a test of one's musical maturity if they could listen to Rossini's "Overture to William Tell" all the way through without once thinking of 'a fiery horse with the speed of light' and his masked rider. The next 2 or 3 frames show the boy and the girl's faces, with their eyes tightly squeezed shut, and their brows knitted, the perfect picture of concentration, while the music blared forth from the TV. Their concentration was interrupted in the last frame, though, when Dad, unshaven and in a T-shirt, shorts and sandals, carrying a beer, enters the room loudly calling out, "HI-YO SILVER, AWAAAAAAYYY!"   I've played a 4-hand piano version of this Rossini overture, and I've mentioned musical maturity to audiences that have heard it, but so far, I've never met anybody who admitted to being musically mature. The excitement of the piece is just too much for our imaginations, so I say why bother with the artistry and compositional structure of some pieces when concentration of those aspects of it conflict with the enjoyment of the music?   Sorry, to wander a bit. Steady there, Silver. Whoa, big fella.   >>(1) I am introducing this piece to a church congregation which is almost >>totally unschooled in organ music, mostly because previous organists have not >>felt it was worth their time trying to educate them and help them enjoy the >>music....   >That is a fine thing to do, and I heartily endorse it, but how is it >"educating" them if you lead them to think that a piece is something that it >isn't?   Rest assured that I will not foist my interpretation off upon them as the only valid one. In fact, I plan to end my brief article with the question, "What do *you* hear?"   Since bringing up this topic, however, several bits of information (new to me) have surfaced, including the mentioning of the then-recently ended Franco-Prussian War, and the inaugural concerts on a large pipe organ (4 manuals and 66 stops in a concert hall seating 5,000) at the opening of the Trocadero in the Exhibition of 1878. I must admit, therefore, that these two events probably played a much greater role in inspiring Franck to write PH, and I truthfully doubt that Franck's religious beliefs played much of a role at all (sigh!).   And, of course, I will bring up these last two facts when I discuss the piece. I don't want to mislead the congregation, just give them a little something to think about while they listen to it, in hopes of sustaining their interest.   At least my question on the origins of PH has been answered. Thank you one and all.   And thanks to you, Harold, for the Davies book idea. I'll check it out soon.   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: IRC Chats (Corrections) From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 12:00:21   At 10:48 08/29/97 -0400, Bob Conway wrote:   >I came across this in my Pipechat mailbox! Fortunately I had not deleted >it. It is from Shirley, our guide and mentor at that time.   She can still be guide and mentor, if you want, just not in an administrative capacity and not representing the ownership/administration of this list.   Some changes and corrections here:     >> Servers: >> together.vt.us.another.net >> together-2.vt.us.another.net >> neato.ca.us.another.net >> sunrise.ca.us.another.net >> dragon.ne.us.another.net >> !hacker.another.net   Only together.vt.us.another.net and neato.ca.us.another.net are in use now. Also, add irc.another.net. That will randomly choose an open server for you.   >> >>Ports are 6667 and 7000. Therefore it would appear there are 12 ways to >>get onto AnotherNet. I was also told to "not be afraid to try 6668 and >>6669" as well.     Wrong these days. Ports 6667 and 7000 are the only ones in use. I *usually* have no troubles with port 7000 on either server. I've heard recently about people having troubles getting on with Port 6667.     >> >> Hope this helps all of you in getting online. >> >> Once connected, type /join #pipechat, and voila!   Any further questions, mailto:pnst@voicenet.com (me). --Shirley      
(back) Subject: Re: A Reminder about IRC #PipeChat. From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 11:53:26   Bob Conway wrote to all about the IRC chats on Mondays and Fridays at 9:00 PM Eastern time (-0400 GMT), and closed with this:   >To do this, we need you all to come on line with us, otherwise the channel >will just fade into oblivion - and we don't want that to happen!   To which I add: If you have troubles, please send mailto:pnst@voicenet.com (me), and I'll take you through the process of getting on. I've been on IRC since I started online about 2 1/2 years ago, so I sort of know what I'm doing. :)   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: IRC Chats (Correction #2) From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 12:01:26   At 10:55 08/29/97 -0400, you wrote: >To all interested Pipechat-l members. > >If this has gone out twice, I apologise, but I thought that you all might >like to see what Shirley told us to do when she was our Guide and Mentor! > >Bob Conway.     It did, Bob. :)   Folks, please see my other response to this for important changes, especially to the server list.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Disguised tunes From: "D. Glenn Day/Keith H. Douglas" <kginc-bham@worldnet.att.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 11:33:33 -0500   Greetings to you Tom and List!   I have used two old favorites as chorale preludes in the past. The theme to "As the World Turns" and "We're In the Money". If you embellish the melody over a accompaniment, with little bridges breaking it up, the effect is quite nice. These work well for the Sundays that are slow and do not warrant much of preparation.   Would like to hear from others who are "guilty" of a sense of humor on this matter.   D. Glenn Day    
(back) Subject: ANNOUNCEMENT: New Co-Owner! From: PipeChat-Admin <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 13:22:55 -0700   Hi everyone.   I am pleased to announce that after some discussion David Scribner has accepted my invitation to be the new Co-Owner of PipeChat. As many of you know, David set up PipeChat on his server about a month or so ago, and it has been working very well for us. It is appropriate therefore that I invited him to be Co-Owner of the list.   David will handle all of the technical problems of the list, that is bounced mail or Server problems etc., while I will continue to handle the day-to-day questions that you may have. If you have any questions or problems at all, please forward them to mailto:admin@pipechat.org and one of us will get back to you as soon as possible.   Some of the plans that we have coming up are the possibilitiy of:   1. Expanded homepages for Organ FAQ's 2. Our own IRC server -- if our system will handle it. We will keep you informed as plans progress.   Please welcome David to our ranks, and thanks for being a part of PipeChat.   Pete!    
(back) Subject: Re: Disguised Music From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 16:17:56 -0500 (CDT)   At 09:14 AM 8/29/97, Vernon wrote: >For those of us not in the Anglican Church and living on this side of the >big pond, would somebody please explain the reason for incredulity at an >organist playing "War March of the Priests" (from Athalia?) by Mendelssohn? > Is there some hidden meaning behind it, known only to our British friends? Granted, I see the humor (worthy of a wry smile, IMHO, but >certainly not guffaws) when an organist plays a piece with such a title in >the presence of "men of God," but is there something more to it that I >don't readily see?   No, that's all the humor there is, worthy perhaps of a wry smile and having a certain tradition behind it -- like all those generations of curates who when leaving the rector and parish where they had trained to go to be a rector on their own account would preach on Genesis 22:5: "Stay here with the ass," etc.   Cheers,   John.    
(back) Subject: IRC From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 18:46:17   Dear listers:   Earlier today, I encouraged anybody who needed help in reaching #pipechat to write me.   In light of Pete's announcement, however, I would encourage you instead to write to new co-owner David Scribner. David has been online in #pipechat for several weeks now, and it is to him that you should look for guidance.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Disguised Tune Transcriptions ? From: "Bob, Diane & Jeff Kinner" <rkinner@one.net> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 18:44:14 -0400   Dear List, While I've had the good fortune of hearing "disguised tunes" played by   a close friend of mine - many years ago - I'm not myself of sufficient talent to improvise such a tune with adequate camoflage. (I can get away with playing Brahms' "Es ist ein Ros" in July, since it's already well disguised). Would anyone be willing (audacious enough) to transcribe such works for us with an equally diabolical sense of humor, but lacking in improvisational skills? Bob -- Bob Kinner AA8FH rkinner@one.net Home Page: http://w3.one.net/~rkinner/      
(back) Subject: Re: Disguised Tune Transcriptions ? From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 18:59:37   At 18:44 08/29/97 -0400, you wrote:   > Would anyone be willing (audacious enough) to transcribe such works >for us with an equally diabolical sense of humor, but lacking in >improvisational skills? > Bob >-- >Bob Kinner AA8FH rkinner@one.net >Home Page: http://w3.one.net/~rkinner/     Anybody's welcome to my "Mickey Mouse", but I quite honestly don't have the time or the incentive to set pencil to paper, don't have music-writing software, and don't have a MIDI setup into the computer, unless I figure out how to "save" to floppy disk from the organ at church.   Any ideas?   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Organist Position Available From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 1997 19:22:03   Hi, Piporglers and Pipechatters!   This is the official advertisement for the position at the Abington Presbyterian Church in suburban Philadelphia. This ad will appear in the AGO magazine in October, and is listed with Westminster Choir College placement service.   -------------------------   ORGANIST/MUSIC ASSISTANT: Abington Presbyterian Church, Abington PA; 1600 members; nationally renowned comprehensive worship and concert music program led by Director of Music Ministries Michael Kemp; full graded choir program, handbells and 75 piece symphony orchestra; substantial concert series called "Music at Abington"; 58 rank Moller organ (1969) completely refurbished in 1996 with advanced solid state technology. Organist works under the supervision of the Director of Music Ministries; plays all regular Sunday and occasional special services; accompanies adult, youth, and two children's choirs; conducts sectional and soloist rehearsals as necessary; directs youth handbell choir; presents one recital per season, and/or a major organ solo work with full orchestra, e.g. the Jongen Symphony Concertante. Average 20 hours per week, salary in the low $20s which includes Social Security and health plan, one month paid vacation (summer) plus two additional weeks for teaching or concertizing. Fees for weddings and funerals are additional compensation. Teaching privileges are available.   CONTACT: Organist Search Committee, Abington Presbyterian Church, Department OL, 1082 Old York Road, Abington, PA 19001. Phone and Fax numbers available. _____________   For more email details, please write me directly at pnst@voicenet.com .   --Shirley