PipeChat Digest #14 - Tuesday, July 29, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: What's in a name? From: photom@ix.netcom.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 18:04:32 -0700   What's in a name?   I've had that questions asked when I started out in a organ shop. I'd ask "what's the differance between a Gedeckt and a Bourdon?" Well, now I know about many differant names for pipe organ stops, but there are some that I still don't know. Maybe someone can help me with a few:   16' Infrabass 8' Bourdon en Bois Corona II-IV (maybe a cornet, BUT there is a II Sesquealtera in the same division) 4' Flauto Tedesco (I thaught it was a Flauto Traverso, but it this Fl. is made of 50% tin) III-IV Loquatio (My guess is a Spanish Mixture, maybe Italian?) A division called "Chazozerot"   The organ that has these stops is in this months TAO. Now really think, WHAT'S IN A NAME?? :)     -William C  
(back) Subject: Re: Question on 4 Weddgs & a Funeral From: Ronnymn@aol.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 18:31:08 -0400 (EDT)   You struck a memory chord with me as I too watched it again and asked myself the name of the organ piece played at I believe the first wedding as they approached the priest or whatever with all the misspeaks.  
(back) Subject: Re: Home pipe organs (long) From: "Wm. G. Chapman" <wchapmn@ibm.net> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 15:55:43 -0400   bruce cornely wrote: > > ... My suspicion is that because of the mixed parentage, and stops having to do > double-, yea, even triple- or worse-duty; that the sound would become > unsatisfactory and unrewarding. Two stops, finely voiced ... are far more satisfactory that 7+ ranks sitting on a chest and > extended ...   Or, perhaps this alternative is possible: If more organists would treat each unit stop as as a well finished stop instead of hitting every available tab in sight they would find a wider variety and greater satisfaction--in thinking creatively.   I admit that I watch in despair as organists sit at unit organs with a mindset that says, "if one stop key is good two is better" and by the time the final stanza arrives if it is on the console it is pushed down. That is not what anyone musical had in mind. The person doing this is just not listening!   The listening organist remembers it is a six stop organ then plays six stops with flexibility in selecting the pitch--and the luxury of sometimes duplicating the stop at more than one pitch. The alternative, left to a builder, is to fix the pitch and allow you to only play in a more limited manner. The first situation hopes for an organist who thinks critically and creatively about the music and the second hopes to keep the organ (builder) sounding good by limiting the displays of bad taste.   This is much like the argument over when and how to include sub and super couplers. If I leave them out then I make it harder for an organist to make the instrument sound bad. I also limit the discriminating organist who might wish to use an "octave transpositioner" for special effects or fill in that missing stop. I have found over the years that I am not the arbiter of good taste in churches. Consequently, I do not try to limit the organ as such. Instead, I sit and cringe when an otherwise "good" idea is abused. I am not yet convinced that the best approach is to design and build what is "safest."   Wm. G. Chapman West Coast Pipe Organ Co.      
(back) Subject: Re: T.O.'s on Video From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 19:46:09 -0400 (EDT)   Also in the first Manniquen (sp?) movie-- it was filmed at Wanamakers and has a scene with the actor at the huge console.......RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: Home pipe organs (long) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 20:03:46 -0400   Bill (may I call you Bill?), you made some very important, controversial, and sad points. First, for me (and this is, of course, all opinion), is the fact that a unified stop cannot be voiced properly. If it is correct as a 4' stop is will not do as well as an 8' stop, or 2, or whatever; and we won't even get into unit mutations. The problem is that each stop cannot be a well finished stop (that is altogether important, controversial & sad). Regarding your second point (the organist who pushes tabe because "more is better") is one reason, a good reason, not to unify. It sounds cruel and judgmental, but if the organist (?) did not have all of these pseudo-options, perhaps there might be some forced learning taking place. I have even seen "respected" organists who are familiar with the organ I play (3/16-38s) come in and add stops that are not even there, or add a stop that is borrowed to a manual that it is already coupled to! (this is sad) Let the builder restrict pitches (yes, yes). I learned a great deal about registration on a small organ on a 60's Schlicker of 6 stops with very stingy unification and no manual coupler. Not only did I have to select carefully (resulting in a good learning expeience), but the organ sounded much better because THE BUILDER had prevented misuse by restricting unification. (important & controversial) Re sub and super couplers (we have already had extensive experience with Unison Off!!!), the only time I use a sub or super coupler is when I need 16' pitch in the chorus and don't have it in the stops, or brightness using a super coupler because I have no mixtures; generally this involves coupling the 2-2/3, 2, and/or 1-3/5 from the choir to the great and octave higher. I think it is just plain lazy to use the 16 or 4 couplers for solo use. Not only is it a very valuable skill to have, being able to physically play an octave higher or lower, but it impresses the people who enjoy watching the organist at work! (important and ? controversial) Lastly, I think it is the builder's responsibility to build an organ that has integrity in its design and equipment. A six stop organ does not need a trompette en chamade or a celeste, or 32 levels of memory. An organ does not need reeds so loud that they interfere with the sermon in the church down the street. The builders owe it not only to the purchaser, and organists, but to the craft of organ building, to design, build, finish, and SELL with integrity. Committees need to be educated, too. And with patience and kindness, it is possible. If more builders built small organs with integrity of design, there would be more churches with them for committees to see and organists to play so that they would know that it can and does work. (important because it impacts us all;controversial because everyone cannot agree; and sad because it results in so many small, unsatisfactory pipe organs that get replaced with large, unsatisfactory substitutes.   Now we can all sit back, crack open a beer, and enjoy this nice can o' worms what I've opened.   cheers, all!   end   o o Bruce Cornely o o o o ______________ o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Dust blown out of new Pipe Organ! From: dougcampbell@juno.com (Douglas A. Campbell) Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 20:17:39 EDT     On Sun, 27 Jul 97 18:44:28 CDT Craig Elders <MIS0003C@tcuavm.is.tcu.edu> writes: > >Good Sunday Evening to ya'll! > >A month or so ago I wrote about the new church pipe organ project I >had worked on for some 4 years now. I wrote about working many >many days and hours each week voicing for some 9 months now on the >new instrument. On Sunday, July 6, I got to blow the dust out of >the organ for the church.   <snip>   Craig,   How about some more info on the organ: SPecs? Who is the builder? Where did the pipes come from, etc.?     Douglas A. Campbell formerly in Skaneateles, NY now in Jackson, WY  
(back) Subject: Re: Home pipe organs long/short From: nstarfil@mediaone.net (Stanley Lowkis) Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 21:30:52 -0400   bruce cornely wrote:   > Bill (may I call you Bill?), you made some very important, > controversial, and sad points. ...................... > > Now we can all sit back, crack open a beer, and enjoy this nice can o' > > worms what I've opened. >   The debate goes on! I'm reminded of some written debates that appeared in 'High Fidelity' back in the 60's between E.Power Biggs and Virgil Fox. Sniping at each other! With great respect and appreciation I have to say that organists tend to be an opinionated lot! As I'm writing this I've been listening to three versions of Ives' 'Variations on America' Biggs playing a nice tracker in Vermont; Richard Ellsasser at Hammond Castle near me on Cape Ann; and Virgil at the Wichita Wurlitzer. It's *all* good. That piece is very different with Biggs enjoying a genteel musical joke and Virgil unleashing the heavy artillery. It's a question of using the full spectrum of the instrument with taste. Forgive me a gross oversimplification by making an analogy to the use of powered sub-woofers in a sound system. They can provide a subtle framework that improves the illusion of an organ, bass drum, explosion etc being in the room - or they can be that car stereo we have all heard that plays BOOM BA BOOM BOOM . (I think the same CD is owned by each of these people)   It's how you use it folks! Stan   P.S. I spell-checked this and some of the suggestions offered were funny!    
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name? From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 21:57:20 -0400 (EDT)   Amen William, I just got my issue of TAO today...of course we are all familiar with "Bourdon en bois" bois being wood, but I found some of the stop names downright silly. I am not talking about the Jewish terminology-- it's appropriate in that situation, I guess. The description given by the builder leads one to believe it's a fairly traditional American Classic style instrument-- but some of those stop names are just too unique for me! To each his own, but I've been around long enough that fancy stop names do not a fabulous sound make. RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: Question on 4 Weddgs & a Funeral From: Stan Guy <Texstan@ix.netcom.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 20:55:43 -0500   The piece at the wedding where the priest was such a dork was a transcription of "Entrance of the Queen of Sheba" from the oratorio Solomon by Handel. I thought it was GREAT!   Stan Guy Ronnymn@aol.com wrote:   > You struck a memory chord with me as I too watched it again and asked > myself > the name of the organ piece played at I believe the first wedding as > they > approached the priest or whatever with all the misspeaks. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org          
(back) Subject: Re: Organs in the Movies/Question on 4 Weddgs & a Funeral From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 22:03:02 -0400 (EDT)   Also remember in the movie Manniquen (spelling?) filmed at Wanamakers with a scene at the famous six manual console...RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: Locked Consoles/ For Shame! From: MFulk70776@aol.com Date: Tue, 29 Jul 1997 00:25:11 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-07-28 16:15:52 EDT, you write:   << So, I don't know if she reads this list, but the organist of that church should know not to waste her time coming to my church to play, since I've have asked that all substitute wedding organists call me first before they play. My list of persons not allowed to play has only one name on it - hers. Thanks for letting me vent. \/\/\ >> Gosh, this seems like unimaginable selfishness! Do the pastor and governing board of the church know of this. A wedding is a once-in-a-lifetime thing, and this kind of "dog-in-the-manger" behavior seems to fly in the face of what churches stand for. Poor bride.  
(back) Subject: ORGAN DESIGN/ UNIFICATION(was home organs) From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 22:23:30 -0400 (EDT)   Bruce and all: Sure to be lots of opinions to this topic. I agree that for church or university use one should stay away from unification to the hilt. Howerver, as you seem to agree with, limited use of unification can greatly add to the organ's usefullness. One of the organs that I play each week was built in 1990 by Randall Dyer of Tennessee. This is a 22 rk. instrument where almost all of the stops are independent in the middle three octaves where most of the music occurs, but several stops share top and bottom octaves (as with the lower 7 or so notes of the great and pedal 8' principals.) The swell mixture is only independent for 37 notes with the top & bottom octaves repeating. My main point is that you can gap pitches successfully as in our swell string (Gemshorn) which is an excellent string/principal hybrid in the 8' range, and is a bright and fully successful 2' Principal as well. I only wish the builder had duplexed the solo reed ( a sort of Clarinet named Krummhorn) or the string/celeste to the great so you would have the option of playing the only solo reed aginst the strings....ho hum....For the home organ, however, I leave that totally up to the one playing it. I'd be happy with a Wicks 2rank "Positive" model. I play one regularly at our local University, and am happy with the 8' + 4' independent combination for hours (it does need some voicing for best results) Never use the unit 2' or 1`-1/3'....Randy T  
(back) Subject: Re: Locked Consoles/ For Shame! From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 29 Jul 1997 00:58:22 -0400   The father of the bride should have done what a lady (a grande lady) in a former parish of mine used to do.... beat 'em over the head with her checkbook. She was great.. Whenever something did not go as she had been inspired to know it sould (!), she would drop a check in the offering plate for about $50 - $100,000, always neglecting the sign the check. When the rector, senior warder, or treasurer would call to thank her for the contribution, they would have to add, "but you forgot to sign the check." She would reply in her (I'm sure) cheeriest voice, "Yessir, and I'll tell you WHY!" I don't often approve of throwing weight around, but the father of that bride should have had that organist's, uh, head mounted and nailed to the console.   end   o o Bruce Cornely o o o o ______________ o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Question on 4 Weddgs & a Funeral From: sheridan.mascall@visionet.com.au (Sheridan Mascall) Date: Tue, 29 Jul 1997 16:07:08 +1000   Stan Guy wrote: > > The piece at the wedding where the priest was such a dork was a > transcription of "Entrance of the Queen of Sheba" from the oratorio > Solomon by Handel. I thought it was GREAT! > > Stan Guy   That was no dork, that was Rowan Atkinson! - better known here as Mr. Bean, but also the man behind the fiendishly sarcastic Blackadder.   Cheers, ~Sheridan~  
(back) Subject: Re: Home pipe organs (long) From: Jlokken@aol.com Date: Tue, 29 Jul 1997 02:25:21 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-07-29 01:42:01 EDT, Wm. Chapman writes (in response to Bruce Cornely):   << Or, perhaps this alternative is possible: If more organists would treat each unit stop as as a well finished stop instead of hitting every available tab in sight they would find a wider variety and greater satisfaction--in thinking creatively. >>   This discussion strikes close to home here, as St. Francis Lutheran in San Francisco has a 6-rank unit Schlicker exactly like the practice organ Bruce praised for its restraint, and we're presently planning the addition of a few more ranks, still unified, but we hope with the kind of musical result these posters have described.   Over the past year we've had a series of recitals by various local organists, and it has been fascinating for me to see what John Fenstermaker and Chris Putnam of Grace Cathedral, for example, or Jonathan Dimmock, could do with the 6 ranks of neo-baroque sparkle. Far from doing a glissando on the stop tabs, as less discerning organists have been known to do, they have listened carefully and chosen registrations of astonishing variety that have been consistently musical and appropriate. The clear flutes, bright principals, and buzzy reed have been exploited in a remarkable variety of music.   Making the most of the resources at hand is more than craft. It is art. I am grateful to those who cultivate this skill and share it with all of us.   Jim Lokken