PipeChat Digest #17 - Wednesday, July 30, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: Calvary Church concert From: rmb10@mindspring.com (Monty Bennett) Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 07:06:55 -0500   Hello to all on the list-   I don't want to blow my own Chamade, but I want to let the list know about my upcoming concert at Calvary Church in Charlotte, North Carolina. (V/205 Moller)   Monty Bennett, organist Sunday, August 17 * 8:00 PM * no tickets required Calvary Church, Charlotte, NC 5801 Pineville-Matthews Road Charlotte, NC 28226   This concert is part of the Charlotte AGO chapter's Summer Recital Series. I will be playing a wide variety of music including: Trio Sonata III in d-Bach; P&F in E Major-Lubeck; Toccata for Organ-Weaver; Tico-Tico-arr. Bennett; plus lots of other works to show off the amazing things our 205 rank Moller can do!   For more information, call the Calvary Ticket Office: 704/543-1007     Monty Bennett Associate Minister of Music/Organist Calvary Church, Charlotte, NC      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Design/Unification was: Home pipe organs (long) From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 08:22:38 -0400 (EDT)   Wm: Yes, of course, I remember now: "don't take it too literally or push it too far!!!" RandyT  
(back) Subject: My Concerts From: jawidmann@juno.com (John A Widmann) Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 08:33:41 EDT   Well, since Monty announced his concert coming up....I will announce mine, if any of you are in the area...sorry, though...not organ concerts! These three are carillon recitals.   August 1, 7:00 pm, carillon recital at McDonough School Chapel, McDonough, MD (48 bell Petit and Fritsen Carillon, 1978)   August 17, 1:00 pm, carillon recital at Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (at the Graduate School Carillon, kind of back a road...off of the main campus 67 Bells, Gillett & Johnston, Paccard, Petit and Fritsen mixture of bells)   September 27, 2:00 pm, carillon recital at the Netherlands Carillon, Arlington, VA, 50 bells, cooperative effort in the 1950's of van Bergen (Heiligerlee, Netherlands), Eijsbouts, and Petit and Fritsen. Renovated 1995 with one additional bell and new keyboard by Eijsbouts.   ....and of course, I play EVERY Sunday, year 'round, at Noon on the Joseph Dill Baker Carillon in beautiful Frederick, Maryland. (49 bells, Meneely, 1941, Eijsbouts, 1966 and Petit and Fritsen, 1995)   John A Widmann City Carillonneur, City of Frederick, Maryland Director of Music, Saint Paul's Lutheran Church, Myersville, Maryland  
(back) Subject: Re: Tough luck? From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 08:39:39 -0400 (EDT)   Tom,   Hopefully it's not a conspiracy aginst you, and just bad timing. I am 35 years old, and when I was your age I was just dreaming about becoming a church organist. I now hold 2 positions, a big (for our town) one at an Episcopal Church with a good pipe organ, and the smaller Lutheran church that I had before I got the Episcopal one changed their schedule and wouldn't let me go...it's very flattering, but in reality there just aren't many organists around who can handle the liturgical church or a choirmaster-organist situation. It's not that they can't, but they don't want to try, I guess. The money is not the best at the Lutheran Church...   Anyway, I promise you I would encourage you to use your God-given talents to his glory if you were a member of either of my parishes, and you might indeed be better than me....so what. If we behave like Christians (as we should) we would lift up the good and encourage everyone to keep striving to better themselves. Someday, there may not be any young people interested in the organ if this kind of thing keeps up.   Let's all pipe up and let these young people know they are welcome at our consoles anytime they want to practice, and that we will support them by letting them play in our churches when it is appropriate......RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: Tough luck? From: John Sinila <js0059@epfl2.epflbalto.org> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 11:45:09 -0400 (EDT)   They may feel a little intimidated and even threatened because of your apparent talents, and if so, that's really a shame, because the organ world needs as much supportive mentors as any other field of pursuit.   On Tue, 29 Jul 1997, tom rishel wrote:   > Hello, I'm just another organist from southwest PA. I'm 15 years old > and have been playing for about 10 years! I take lessons from a very > respectable teacher in Pittsburgh and I really enjoy playing the organ. > > Here's my story: > About 1 year ago I asked the organist at our small, hometown, Catholic > church if I could start playing in church occasionally because I > love playing the organ and I hope to make a living out of it someday. > She said that she would ask the pastor and call me back. Around a month > later she ran into me and told me that the pastor said it was OK and she > would call me during the course of the week to set up a rehearsal or > something. Well, she never attempted to call me back or anything. In > fact, when she sees me in public she seems to try to avoid me! I figured > that would never happen again. > I then on Holy Thursday went to another couple of interviews at 2 other > local churches and both organists took my phone number and seemed > impressed with my playing. They also told me they would call me back. As > my luck would have it, 4 mos. pass, no phone call! > Just tough luck, or a conspiracy?! You decide. > Tom :-) > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Locked Consoles/ For Shame! From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 09:53:45   Bruce Cornely said: > I don't often approve of throwing weight around, but the father of > that bride should have had that organist's, uh, head mounted and nailed > to the console. > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>   I have to agree. While my argument is not with the organist for dropping the wedding because of conflicting family plans (a vacation out of the city, a parent's funeral, etc), her 'dog in the manger' act was just too much for me. After I sent my earlier message, I thought that perhaps putting her on a list of one (the only person not permitted to play my church's organ) might be interpreted as being childish, but now I'm glad to find that other organists here are sympathetic to my cause. Thanks, folks!   \/\/\ >  
(back) Subject: Re: Tough Luck? (long) From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 10:56:43   UH-OH! SOMEBODY HIT ONE OF MY BUTTONS!!! (Sorry for the length!)   >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> At 09:27 PM 7/29/97 -0500, Tom Rishel wrote: >Hello, I'm just another organist from southwest PA. I'm 15 years old... >{snip!} >...I then on Holy Thursday went to another couple of interviews at 2 other >local churches and both organists took my phone number and seemed >impressed with my playing. They also told me they would call me back. As >my luck would have it, 4 mos. pass, no phone call! >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>   That's a tough break, Tom, and I'm sorry you had it happen to you while you're still young. But maybe there's a silver lining in that cloud. For more info, read on:   First off, congratulations on having the intelligence and ambition to choose church organ-playing as a future vocation or avocation. I've been playing organ for United Methodist, Presbyterian and Christian (Disciples of Christ) churches for over 25 years now, and I find it to be a richly rewarding side-line, plus I've met some truly wonderful people at the churches where I've played.   Now, as to your problem: I'd like to address 4 issues here, and please keep an open mind on my suggestions until after you've read my whole letter. The first is the possibility that the other organists were just being nice to you, but that they didn't think you play as well as you think you do. Does your teacher know you're doing this? Has (s)he helped you prepare an audition repertoire? Do you know your strengths and weaknesses and can you discuss them intelligently? What do you see yourself doing 10 years from now? 20 or more? If you can discuss such issues intelligently with a potential pastor, you will be one giant step closer to securing a position as a church organist. I'm not trying to be mean or scare you off, but you have to approach your situation objectively if you are going to employ a better strategy than you have used thus far.   Secondly, there is also the possibility that your technique and style of playing so far surpass the capabilities of other organists that they are all too jealous of you to risk being replaced by you; in other words, they hear you play and they think, "WOW! What a performance! If the pastor hears this, I'm out on the street!" In order to accurately assess your relative standing in the world of organists in your area, I think you should make every effort to hear your teacher's other students, and then ask your teacher to compare you to them. I think we all tend to view our own playing as little short of divine, so it takes an impartial ear to hear us as we *really* sound, and a diplomatic tongue to tell us the truth without destroying our egos. And that's what you pay your teacher to do.   So, the first two issues here directly concern you and your teacher, so I'd get an opinion from him/her ASAP. After all, you don't want to go out into "battle" with your BVD's unprotected, do you? ;-)   Thirdly, you must sell yourself. I have been fortunate enough to be hired by every church that I auditioned for, with one exception, and that was when I withdrew my name from consideration after I met the pastor and decided that all the tea in China would not pay enough for me to work with that horse's rear! Selling yourself is easier than it sounds. After you audition for a church job, be sure to attend that church at their main service, once or twice after your audition. Make sure you meet the pastor. Organists, while offering sage advice to hiring committees and pastors, rarely hire replacement organists; the committee and/or the pastors do that, so they're the ones you must impress. Their thinking will often overrule the advice of the organist (unfortunately, this will also tell you where you stand in the pecking order of most church staffs). When you attend that church, before you are hired, be sure you greet the organist, the pastor(s) and most importantly, *the choir,* because chances are one of the committee-members will be in the choir. They will observe how confident and friendly you are. Smile a *lot*! Compliment them on their performance, but don't go overboard; compare them to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and you may have seen the last of them. Be yourself, but if you are by nature a quiet, reserved person, this is not the time to be quiet and reserved. If you blend with the wallpaper, they will forget about you. If they ask you for your opinion of another organist in the city, possibly somebody else who auditioned for the job you're interested in, say absolutely nothing derogatory about them. If you know that person is fantastic, just be neutral and say "I've heard that he is a fine organist," and leave it at that. If coffee is served in the Fellowship Hall afterwards, be sure you attend, if only briefly. You want to be seen, and you want to scope out the church. Are there lots of young families? Are most of the heads grey, silver or white? How is the church furnished? These two questions will tell you a lot about where the church's money is coming from, and where it is going. Finally, don't wait to hear from them; call the pastor (not the organist) and ask to know about the status of the organist position. It's altogether possible the current organist changed his/her mind and didn't leave; maybe it was a money thing, and they just threatened to leave unless they got a raise. You don't know for sure and you won't know unless you call. If they hired somebody else, ask if there was some aspect of your performance on which you were downgraded, or weren't graded as highly as you had hoped for; after all, if you don't get the job, you at least want to be able to learn from that situation so that you will be better prepared in the future.   As an aside, while I pretty happily employed during the day (I'm a computer programmer for a State agency), I still occasionally go to job interviews, not because I'm looking for a job, but because I use those interviews as practice for a job that might sound like Heaven when I hear about it. Audition as often as possible; it will help you get over any nerves you may have, and it will be good practice. Plus, you will be seen and you will be heard, and if you're good, your name will be passed along between musicians, and you'll get calls for weddings, funerals, etc.   Finally (aren't you glad?), *be patient.* You're young - you have your whole life ahead of you. If you don't get a job right now, be thankful that you don't have a family to support and organ-playing is your only skill. There are a lot of people in that boat, believe me. If you're still living at home with your parents, be glad that they are able to clothe you, give you 3 squares a day and a warm place to sleep, and all the emotional sustenance you need to prepare yourself for what lies ahead of you in life.   One other little thing - the organists who can't do anything except play organ are not few in number. Don't become one of them. Do you know how to type well? If not, learn. At one time in my life, I held 7 part-time jobs: I played organ for a church, I taught piano lessons, I did word processing for The University (UT Austin), I played harpsichord for a Baroque quintet, I played piano in a Big Band (Glenn Miller-type music), I did accompanying for voice lessons and a large University choir, and I was an apartment manager, too. If all you've ever done was work in music, try something out of it; it will open your eyes to what the 'real world' is like, and you will see music as non-musicians see it so that you can appreciate it even more when you do work in music. Take time, while you're still young, to learn all that you can about a non-musical job in which you could support yourself if you had to; remember, jobs in the entertainment industry are very hard on you; there are a lot of temptations in it that can hurt you in the long run (drugs, promiscuity, etc), and whenever the economy falls on hard times, guess which industry gets kicked in the rear, since people don't have enough money to have fun with? So, get interested in computing, or try wood-work (carpentry), or try sales. Just diversify - be a Renaissance man, somebody who can do a lot of things pretty well.   Sorry I ran on so long, but you hit one of my buttons. Bet you won't do that again, will you? ;-)   Hope this helps. Good Luck and Good Hunting!   \/\/\   * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * "An Irishman has an abiding sense of TRAGEDY which * * sustains him through temporary periods of JOY." * * ----------------------------------------------------* * Vernon Moeller - Organist, Programmer & Irishman * * * * * * * vernonm@ccsi.com * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
(back) Subject: Re: Home pipe organs (long)/ No Flames From: MFulk70776@aol.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 12:17:31 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-07-29 16:41:18 EDT, you write:   << If it were not for differences, we might as well all play Hammonds (Oh God! not more flames, I only used Hammond because of tonal consistency!) >> And you used it well. I love both Hammonds and pipe organs. So, it takes all kinds...........  
(back) Subject: Re: Tough luck? From: MFulk70776@aol.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 12:43:40 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-07-30 01:43:31 EDT, you write:   << Just tough luck, or a conspiracy?! You decide. Tom :-) >> Sounds like a "cheesy" little town.  
(back) Subject: Re: Tough luck? From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 16:28:23 -0400 (EDT)   Tom....Vernon made some good points. Particularly the one about diversification. I thought about this after I had read your post this morning. In thinking about church music as a possible full-time career, think very hard. If there are other fields that you are interested in, by all means persue them, because even the most talented organist-choirmasters usually don't make it past the $40,000.00 mark, and although that may seem like alot, believe me, it isn't, and if you plan to marry and have children you will need as much as you can make!! On the other hand, if you are completely wrapped up in music-- go for it, because that is the only way you will be happy....but as Vernon said, plan on holding more than one job (I currently have 2 church jobs, attend the local university (I changed my major more than once in my pilgrimage), and am starting an almost full-time office job this fall. My goal is full-time music ministry, but until then....   One other point. Churches are rewarding to work in, but they are often very difficult. Think about it....all those members who are not employees and run the place...they can often be difficult since there is no "boss" to keep them in line. This doesn't happen often, but when it does it can be pretty bad.   Good luck..........RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: Locked Consoles/ For Shame! From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 17:33:45 -0400   I may be way out of line, but I'll go out on a limb anyway. Any organist who behaves like this should be censured from AGO and her magazine stopped, and she should be allowed only SPAM from organist chat lines. Although, it is likely that she is not a member. Anyone hot enough to publish her name!!   end   o o Bruce Cornely o o o o ______________ o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Tough Luck? (long) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 17:40:55 -0400   Gee Vernon, where were you when I was a kid? Good advice, well said, etc. The only thing I would add is to find someone to can advise on savings and investments, and start squirreling NOW, even if its only a little.   end   o o Bruce Cornely o o o o ______________ o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ for a small congregation From: nstarfil@mediaone.net (Stanley Lowkis) Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 17:21:14 -0400   <HTML> CDKrug@aol.com wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>So what sort of pipes would you suggest for a small congregation. <BR>&nbsp;   <P>BTW--it has to cost &lt;$1000 and have no maintenence needs ;-)</BLOCKQUOTE> <TT>Charles,</TT><TT>&nbsp;I would respectfully suggest considering using an instrument</TT> <BR><TT>other than the organ. Legend tells us that 'Silent Night'</TT> <BR><TT>was written for the auto-harp. A service with folk instruments</TT> <BR><TT>and congregational singing can be very moving.</TT> <BR><TT>I am attaching the following link with some humor - but there</TT> <BR><TT>are many ways of expressing Praise - whatever the means!</TT><TT></TT>   <P><TT>Good luck,</TT> <BR><TT>Stan</TT><TT></TT>   <P><A NAME="http://www.volcano.net/~jackmearl/"></A><TT><A HREF="http://www.volcano.net/~jackmearl/">http://www.volcano.net/~jackmearl/</A></TT> <BR><TT></TT>&nbsp; <BR><TT></TT>&nbsp; <BR><TT></TT>&nbsp; <BR><TT></TT>&nbsp; <BR><TT></TT>&nbsp; <BR>&nbsp; <BR><TT></TT>&nbsp; <BR><TT></TT>&nbsp; <BR><TT></TT>&nbsp;</HTML>    
(back) Subject: Re: My Concerts From: ManderUSA@aol.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 20:05:25 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-07-30 14:05:49 EDT, you write:   << August 17, 1:00 pm, carillon recital at Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (at the Graduate School Carillon, kind of back a road...off of the main campus 67 Bells, Gillett & Johnston, Paccard, Petit and Fritsen mixture of bells) >>   A few years ago, I entertained the organ committee from Christ Church Cranbrook in Michigan at the Princeton Chapel organ. Their young assistant organist and carilloneur, Philip (whose last name won't come to me) phoned up the Princeton Carilloneur to see if he could visit the instrument, just recently restored. Instead, he got asked to play the 5:15 recital that day, so we all dutifully trouped along. He is a brilliant player, BUT I, who have heard lots of carillons, and no more-or-less what to expect, have never heard such a totally out-of-tune sounding instrument. I know there are all kinds of discussions about those thirds and all of that, but this was far beyond that. I mentioned it to Phillip, who really did not understand what I was talking about. Am I crazy??   Do you ever get invited to play the instrument at the First Presbyterian (Fish) Church in my town, Stamford, CT? George Matthew is the carilloneur.   Cheers, Malcolm  
(back) Subject: Bach and Tempo From: Ronnymn@aol.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 20:23:53 -0400 (EDT)   With this I will need not explain that I am an amateur but here goes. I am much more well read than I am well taught to play the organ. I understand why there is not agreement as to tempo and there probably shouldn"t be even had Bach had been quite explicit. What knaws at me is the "given" of a steady uniform rhythm. I understand the driving affect on the whole. It just seems to me there are so many episodes that cryout to be slowed down to really savor the harmony, melody, whatever. Why would this be in such bad taste. Why do we know this would not have been done. One example to me would be ms 35-45 of the Am prelude (BWV 543). Why not slow down and smell the roses? When i listen to this on a CD, this short little gem is lost in the woosh of the train. I am sure i "see" too many of these, but as an amateur, what I do in the privacy of my own home is my business. Right? Really, I am serious . To me this is a seperate issue than too fast versus too slow e.g Newman or Rubsam (sp?)  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach and Tempo From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 21:24:47 -0400   Ronny, You not only have the right idea about "stopping to smell the roses", but you have the advantage that it is within you and is ready to be used to make music. Sensitivity in very difficult to teach, and it is critical in the musical communication of all periods of music from Buxtuhude (and before) to Locklair (and beyond). This need for breathing is one of the reasons (and I offer this as an observation and not intending to start a piston war) that I prefer mechanical key AND stop action. Both force ME to consider very carefully what I am doing and how I can best do it musically with the restraints imposed upon me by this great instrument, the organ. You are on the right track: stay on it, and polish it so that you can travel smoothly and cleanly. Enjoy the music; to be one with it you must breathe together.   end   o o Bruce Cornely o o o o ______________ o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name? From: pniki@firstavenue.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 22:17:49 -0500   I won't choose to reply to the questions about the instrument in question, although at least some of the terminology has to do with the fact that the instrument is in a synagogue, but I will say that a played a funeral for a friend at the church around the corner from my own last week and was delighted to notice the drawknob for "Sanctus Spiritus 3' " on the great. I kept it out for the funeral. It added a certain ghostly air to the sound ;-)   Peter Nikiforuk     Message routed through FIRSTline's SMTP Gateway.   First Avenue Information Systems Inc. People. Solutions. Service. (519) 746-5630    
(back) Subject: Re: What's in a name? From: pniki@firstavenue.com Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 22:17:49 -0500   I won't choose to reply to the questions about the instrument in question, although at least some of the terminology has to do with the fact that the instrument is in a synagogue, but I will say that a played a funeral for a friend at the church around the corner from my own last week and was delighted to notice the drawknob for "Sanctus Spiritus 3' " on the great. I kept it out for the funeral. It added a certain ghostly air to the sound ;-)   Peter Nikiforuk     Message routed through FIRSTline's SMTP Gateway.   First Avenue Information Systems Inc. People. Solutions. Service. (519) 746-5630    
(back) Subject: Re: My Concerts From: SteveL@nycnet.com (SteveL) Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 19:41:01 -0400   pipechat@pipechat.org,Internet writes: >A few years ago, I entertained the organ committee from Christ Church >Cranbrook in Michigan at the Princeton Chapel organ. Their young >assistant >organist and carilloneur, Philip (whose last name won't come to me) >phoned up >the Princeton Carilloneur to see if he could visit the instrument, just >recently restored. Instead, he got asked to play the 5:15 recital that >day, >so we all dutifully trouped along. He is a brilliant player, BUT I, who >have >heard lots of carillons, and no more-or-less what to expect, have never >heard >such a totally out-of-tune sounding instrument. I know there are all >kinds of >discussions about those thirds and all of that, but this was far beyond >that. >I mentioned it to Phillip, who really did not understand what I was >talking >about. Am I crazy??   Malcolm:   Traditional carillon bells are tuned with a prominent minor third overtone; thus, they can sound out of tune in certain chords. Now and then, due to weather conditions and wear-and-tear, the clappers can become flattened, which would result in a "thud" sound, also not pleasant. However, the carillonneur (note spelling with 2 n's) should be able to adjust the strike threshold given he/she has enough time to do so before performing.   The carillon at 1st Pres in Stamford, CT (the "fish church") has the same type of tuning with a minor third overtone. However, the sound of those bells in a freestanding, open tower, does not benefit from the "mix" when the bells are in a, say, traditional gothic-type tower with bell chamber and louvers.   Steve Lawson - NYC (also a full carillon member of the Guild of Carillonneurs in N.A. but no longer playing one)                                                  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach and Tempo From: "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net> Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 22:53:46 -0400   At 08:23 PM 7/30/97 -0400, you wrote: > What knaws at me is the "given" of a >steady uniform rhythm. t >just seems to me there are so many episodes that cryout to be slowed down to >really savor the harmony, melody, whatever. Why would this be in such bad >taste.   Seems to me that you can play it as you feel it should be... I rather doubt if Bach would care too much, and God certainly won't-- who else matters??? Paul Stapel    
(back) Subject: Re: Site From: sheridan.mascall@visionet.com.au (Sheridan Mascall) Date: Thu, 31 Jul 1997 14:26:35 +1000   Stanley Lowkis wrote: >   > I am attaching the following link with some humor - but there > are many ways of expressing Praise - whatever the means! > > Good luck, > Stan > > http://www.volcano.net/~jackmearl/           AAAAAAAAAAAAARGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!